african customs

In Ghana, people are often buried in ‘fantasy coffins’. The Ga people believe life in the next world continues in the same way it did on earth, so carpenters honor the dead with custom coffins that represent their dreams, personalities, occupations, vices, or obsessions. Source Source 2 Source 3

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Godmother of Rock ‘N Roll - Sister Rosetta Tharpe (1915-1973) and her Gibson Les Paul SG - Up Above My Head (I hear music in the air)

Cat lady? I think not~

LINK:
NIGHTCRAWLER_SIMS(hair) - https://www.thesimsresource.com/artists/Nightcrawler_Sims
TOKSIK(hat + Dress) - https://www.thesimsresource.com/artists/toksik
Ms_Blue(skin) -
https://www.thesimsresource.com/artists/Ms_Blue
SIMPLYPIXELATED(vertillego) - https://www.thesimsresource.com/members/SimplyPixelated
PRALINESIMS(eyeshadow) - https://www.thesimsresource.com/artists/Pralinesims
REMUSSIRION(lipstick) - https://www.thesimsresource.com/members/RemusSirion

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The Braided Rapunzels of Africa

The hairstyle currently making you do a double-take is known as Eembuvi Braids, worn by women of the Mbalantu tribes from the Namibia. It’s a style that requires preparation from a young age, usually around twelve years old, when Mbalantu girls use thick layers of finely ground tree bark and oils– a mixture that is said to be the secret to growing their hair to such lengths.
The girls will live with this thick fat-mixture on their scalp for several years before it’s loosened and the hair becomes visible. It will then be braided and styled into various gravity-defying headresses throughout their life.

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Hey! I tryed to make an actror that i just fall for,Corentin Fila,from a movie ‘’Being 17′’. I tryed to make a similar face, i hope they look alike a bit :)

If you want to download him my origin ID is Veventza

*I just wanted to copy his face,not the clothing style of the actual actor :)

flickr

Imdra. Wild Huntress 2. by Firexia
Via Flickr:
www.etsy.com/ru/listing/450161460/imdra-african-wild-hunt…

vimeo

The United States of Hoodoo

The United States of Hoodoo explores the influence of African spirituality, traditional religions, customs and Culture brought to the Americas by with the people taken during the Trans-Atlantic Slave trade, in American popular culture.
It is written by Darius James and Oliver Hardt and directed by Hardt.

Documentary overview The United States of Hoodoo is a road trip to the sources of black popular culture in America. The film’s main character is African-American writer Darius James who is known for his often bitingly satirical and self-ironic texts on music, film and literature. The film’s story begins when Darius´ world is turned inside out after his father´s death.

Uprooted from his life in Berlin, he unwillingly returns to his childhood home. All that remains from his father is his mask collection and a cardboard box filled with ashes. His father had been a painter and sculptor, his work drawing deeply on manifestations of African-based spirituality.Yet while he lived he fiercely rejected any idea of being inspired by the old gods of Africa.

Back in a house that is now his, but not quite, Darius finds himself confronted with many questions about his own life. In need of answers he sets off on a search, not for his roots but for traces of the spiritual energy that fueled and informed a whole culture.

It is available for digital purchase and download from Amazon.

Easter Highlands Province of Papua New Guninea

A number of different tribes have lived scattered across the highland plateau for 1000 years, in small agrarian clans, isolated by the harsh terrain and divided by language, custom and tradition. The legendary Asaro Mudmen first met with the Western world in the middle of the 20th century. Legend has it that the Mudmen were forced to flee from an enemy into the Asaro River where they waited until dusk to escape. The enemy saw them rise from the banks covered in mud and thought they were spirits. The Asaro still apply mud and masks to keep the illusion alive and terrify other tribes.

The mudmen could not cover their faces with mud because the
people of Papua New Guinea thought that the mud from the Asaro
river was poisonous. So instead of covering their faces with this alleged
poison, they made masks from pebbles that they heated and water
from the waterfall, with unusual designs such as long or very short
ears either going down to the chin or sticking up at the top,
long joined eyebrows attached to the top of the ears, horns and
sideways mouths.

Diverse, but not THAT diverse

I was doing a photoshoot for a client who wanted a library of photos for promoting to their African-American and Hispanic customer. The first comment I got on the first round of photos?

Client: This feels too diverse.