african cattle

Georgia Police Used Taser Like A Cattle Prod To Force Black Man To Walk Until He Died (VIDEO)

Georgia Police Used Taser Like A Cattle Prod To Force Black Man To Walk Until He Died (VIDEO)

Image of a Taser uploaded to Flickr by user jasonesbain


A Georgia man is dead after police used their Tasers multiple times to force him to walk.

Gregory Towns ran from police and was so tired after they caught up to him that he could no longer walk as police officers Marcus Eberhart and Howard Weems demanded. So what did these officers do? They used their Tasers to shock Towns into getting up…

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Africans and The Making of the Americas: Part 3, Herding

Africans and The Making of the Americas: Part 3, Herding

Residents of the vast savanna region of West Africa; notably the Mandinka, Wolof, Fulani, Hausa, and Nupe began raising cattle at least as early as 4000 B.C. Those who came to the essential because Europeans had no experience with the conditions presented by the Americas, where there was abundant land and small labor force.…

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When two parasites are better than one: (Unusual) insights into ways to combat human parasitic diseases

When two parasites are better than one: (Unusual) insights into ways to combat human parasitic diseases

Portrait of one of Kenya’s  Improved Boran breed of cattle (photo credit: ILRI/Stevie Mann).

‘Parasites found in African cattle could offer a new insight into ways of combatting serious parasitic diseases in humans, including malaria.

A team funded by the Wellcome Trust has found that cows can be protected from parasites that cause deadly diseases if they have been infected with a closely…

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An international team of scientists has quantified, for the first time, how co-infection by parasites significantly reduces the severity of the African cattle-killing disease East Coast fever. In east and central Africa, East Coast fever is spread when a tick bites a cow and injects the parasite Theileria parva (T. parva) through its saliva. The resulting disease attacks white blood cells, similar to a fast-moving lymphoma in humans, killing more than a million cattle each year.

Cattle-killer: Two parasites are better than one

An international team of scientists has quantified, for the first time, how co-infection by parasites significantly reduces the severity of the African cattle-killing disease East Coast fever. In east and central Africa, East Coast fever is spread when a tick bites a cow and injects the parasite Theileria parva (T. parva) through its saliva. The resulting disease attacks white blood cells, similar to a fast-moving lymphoma in humans, killing more than a million cattle each year.

from Latest Science News — ScienceDaily http://ffc.im/1N6pYrl

Cattle-killer: Two parasites are better than one
An international team of scientists has quantified, for the first time, how co-infection by parasites significantly reduces the severity of the African cattle-killing disease East Coast fever. In east and central Africa, East Coast fever is spread when a tick bites a cow and injects the parasite Theileria parva (T. parva) through its saliva. The resulting disease attacks white blood cells, similar to a fast-moving lymphoma in humans, killing more than a million cattle each year.





from Latest Science News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/19f8Lyq via Karis World


from Blogger http://ift.tt/1Hq2goa
March 23, 2015 at 09:30AM
Cattle-killer: Two parasites are better than one

An international team of scientists has quantified, for the first time, how co-infection by parasites significantly reduces the severity of the African cattle-killing disease East Coast fever. In east and central Africa, East Coast fever is spread when a tick bites a cow and injects the parasite Theileria parva (T. parva) through its saliva. The resulting disease attacks white blood cells, similar to a fast-moving lymphoma in humans, killing more than a million cattle each year.



from Latest Science News — ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1HsxtdJ Science Daily Top News:
Cattle-killer: Two parasites are better than one

An international team of scientists has quantified, for the first time, how co-infection by parasites significantly reduces the severity of the African cattle-killing disease East Coast fever. In east and central Africa, East Coast fever is spread when a tick bites a cow and injects the parasite Theileria parva (T. parva) through its saliva. The resulting disease attacks white blood cells, similar to a fast-moving lymphoma in humans, killing more than a million cattle each year.http://dlvr.it/94mC6Y