african american superhero

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we finally got a super hero movie with one of the most diverse casts ever AND EVERYONE IS LETTING IT FLOP.

OH LOOK: A SUPER HERO MOVIE WITH • INDIAN SUPERHERO
• CHINESE SUPERHERO
• LATINA SUPERHERO
• HANDICAPPED SUPERHERO
• AUTISTIC AND AFRICAN AMERICAN SUPERHERO
• QUEER SUPERHERO
•GREAT ACTING
•RELATABLE CHARACTERS
•GREAT SOUNDTRACK
• A+++ CHEMISTRY
• NOSTALGIA
• NO FORCED ROMANCE
• NO NEGATIVE STEREOTYPES FOR PEOPLE WITH AUTISM
• NO QUEER BAITING
• FEMALE LEADS THAT AREN’T USED AS LEVERAGE FOR THE MALE LEADS
• AND THE OPPORTUNITY FOR 5 FUTURE SEQUELS WITH A FEMALE GREEN RANGER


But no, everyone wants to go see another Scarlett Johansson flick (no shade I love her), Alec Baldwin voicing a baby, and beauty and the beast.

If there’s not going to be a sequel, someone fight me. I may be little but I’m feisty.

Praying that South Korea, Tokyo, and China save the day because once again, America has let me down.

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By Creator Tony Isabellaand art by  Clayton Henry‏

I know he not static but he the next big next big. 

I wanna let y’all comic heads to know and aware that  Black Lightning is getting a miniseries which it coming out on the 1st of November.If any of y’all have a some interest in the character then its the best opportunity to pick up and support and spared awareness of the book as it still hot. DC has pulling him lately from giving a show to dlc skin and now his another chance of a comic book its up to us to let it waste in vain. Let shows them we want POC as they own character and don’t to rely on brand recognition of popular white heroes(im looking at you marvel).

https://www.comixology.com/Black-Lightning-Cold-Dead-Hands-2017-1/digital-comic/575876

Plz, give it a buy spared the word as you can.

Year-old Kensington comic book store and coffeehouse getting attention

Since Ariell Johnson opened her comic book store and coffee shop in Kensington in December 2015, she has taken the world by Storm.

In fact, her childhood fascination with Storm, the X-Men superheroine, led her to comic book and sci-fi fantasy geek fandom in the first place, she said.

She has been profiled on ABC News, CNN Money, and MSNBC, not to mention various nerd and geek websites, as the first African American woman to open a comic book store on the East Coast.

And in November, she was depicted on a variant cover of the Invincible Iron Man No. 1 comic book, along with Riri Williams, the 15-year-old African American superhero character known as Ironheart.

Storm “was the first black woman superhero I ever saw,” Johnson, 33, said at her shop, Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse, 2578 Frankford Ave.

“In addition, she was a powerhouse; she was one of the most powerful mutants in the X-Men universe. She controlled the very elements. She wasn’t a sidekick. She was the main event, which was exciting.”

Johnson said all the attention has been good for business.

“I think we’re doing well. We’ve had a very strong first year, and an untraditional first year, with all the hubbub around the shop,” she said.

Diversity in comic books has been met with some backlash from mostly male fans who assert on YouTube videos that characters should not be suddenly changed to black or gay. Some have called it pandering to attract more women and people of color to comics.

Johnson has not hesitated to speak out about the importance of the comic book world becoming more inclusive.

That means having characters who represent everyone - black, white, Latino, Asian, and people of all religions and sexual identities.

She makes sure to carry books written by and for women and people of color.

Johnson said people like them as heroes in fantasy and science fiction can empower young readers.

“When young girls come in here and know that a woman owns the shop, a black woman owns the shop, and they can see titles where girls are the heroes and not just the love interests or the sidekick … when they see women and girls taking the lead in things, that’s really powerful,” she said.

Since word of Johnson’s success got around, celebrity comic book writers have visited Amalgam.

The store was packed a couple of months ago when Ta-Nehisi Coates came for a book signing to accompany the release of a new comic in his Marvel series Black Panther.

She has also welcomed Greg Pak, author of X-Treme X-Men and other titles, and U.S. Rep. John Lewis, the civil rights icon who coauthored a graphic novel, March.

Amalgam is spacious and colorful, with a red couch at the front window and blue and yellow armchairs nearby. In fact, it’s like entering a live comic strip tableau.

Small round tables have comic book logos: symbols for ThunderCat, Captain America, and Spider-Man.

Johnson said she became enamored of superheroes while watching television cartoon shows as a child.

“I’ve always liked shows about super powers,” she said. “I grew up watching ThunderCats, He-Man and She-Ra. But none of those shows had any black characters featured.”

When she was about 11, she saw herself in the character Storm in X-Men cartoons.

“In addition to being black and a woman, she had dark skin. The only thing that didn’t look like me was that she had white hair and blue eyes.”

A Baltimore native, Johnson came to Philadelphia to attend Temple University and earned an accounting degree there in 2005.

It took a decade of working for other people, first in retail and later as an accountant, before she decided to fulfill her dream.

Inside Amalgam the other day, Sam Woods Thomas, the commercial corridor coordinator for New Kensington Community Development Corp., said the coffee shop was the only one in the neighborhood.

Still, he said, things are looking up, with a new apartment development in the next block that people are comparing to the Piazza in Northern Liberties.

But he said it’s small businesses like Johnson’s that are key.

“They bring life back to the block,” Thomas said.

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VIDEO: Ray Fisher Interview - Cyborg - JUSTICE LEAGUE

i want more black characters in comic book movies

black villains

black heroes

black sidekicks

black comic relief

black supporting characters

black characters who are noble

black characters who are evil

black characters who are good because of altruism

black characters who are good because they feel guilty

black characters who are good because they want revenge

black characters who are good because it’s their job

black characters who are arguably not really on the side of good at all

black characters who are evil for sympathetic reasons

black characters who are evil because they fucking love causing destruction

black characters who are evil because they’re greedy

black characters who are evil because it’s their job

black characters who arguably aren’t evil at all

JUST. MORE. BLACK. CHARACTERS. IN. SUPER HERO. OR COMIC BOOK. MOVIES!!!!!

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VIDEO: Victor Stone a.k.a. Cyborg - JUSTICE LEAGUE (Official HD)

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October 17th is the birthday of John Stewart, Green Lantern of Sector 2814.  Happy Birthday, John Stewart!  (Not to be confused with the fake news guy, Jon Stewart)

Created by Dennis O’Neil and Neal Adams, John Stewart first appeared in Green Lantern v.2 #87 in December 1971.  He is DC’s first African-American superhero.  (The Black Racer appeared earlier in 1971, but is not exactly a “hero”).

A former Marine and architect from Detroit, John Stewart was selected by the Guardians of the Universe to be the backup Green Lantern for Hal Jordan when Guy Gardner was seriously injured.  He served as the backup Green Lantern several times before becoming the primary Green Lantern of Sector 2814 in Green Lantern v.2 #182 (November 1984), when Hal Jordan relinquished his ring.  He has remained a member of the Green Lantern Corps, even after Hal Jordan returned.  He has also served as a member of the Justice League.

Here are a few John Stewart comics from the DuGarm Collection at the University of Iowa: Special Collections.

Green Lantern v.2 #188 (May 1985), cover by Joe Staton and Bruce Patterson

Green Lantern: Mosaic v.1 #3 (August 1992), cover by Cully Hamner and Keith Aiken

Green Lantern v.2 #190 (July 1985), cover by Joe Staton and Bruce Patterson

Crisis on Infinite Earths v.1 #1 (April 1985), cover by George Perez

Green Lantern v.2 #165 (June 1983), cover by Gil Kane

Crisis on Infinite Earths v.1 #2 (April 1985), cover by George Perez

Green Lantern v.2 #182 (November 1984), cover by Dave Gibbons

Green Lantern Corps v.1 #202 (July 1986), cover by Joe Staton and Bruce Patterson

Green Lantern v.3 #6 (November 1990), cover by Pat Broderick

Who’s Who: The Definitive Directory of the DC Universe v.1 #9 (November 1985), cover by Paris Cullins and Dick Giordano

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See what happened was I was ready to take out my hair,but decided to wait until I got home-Then Storm came upon me. Period.