african american nativity

I find it funny when people will tell kids of mixed ethnicity’s to choose one ethnicity over the other but will tell bi/pansexual that it’s ok to like both/all genders and there’s no reason to choose. 

How about before you tell that precious mixed baby that they need to choose, instead of celebrating themselves to the fullest, maybe you should a) look at yourself and b) realize that whatever ethnicity a person chooses to be is none of your goddamn business then c) log off and think about your double standards.

Focus on yourself and your culture and sexuality and stop intruding on other people celebrating who they are. Ok?

All The Topics to Know for the APUSH Exam (as told by my APUSH teacher)
  • Revolutionary War/Constitution/Articles of Confederation
  • The First Party System: Federalists and Republicans
  • Revolution of 1800
  • Jacksonian Democracy (1824-1840)
    • the Bank War
    • the spoils system
    • Indian Removal Act
  • Antebellum reform movements and the Second Great Awakening
  • Causes of the Civil War and sectional differences
    • political parties (Democrats vs. New Republicans)
    • economics
    • social differences
  • Reconstruction (1863-1877)
    • successes/failures
    • 13th - 15th amendments
      • connections to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s
  • Industrialization and Big Business/The Gilded Age (1860-1910)
    • vertical and horizontal integration
    • trusts
    • steel, oil, and railroads
    • Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, J.P. Morgan
    • growth of cities
    • immigration
    • changes in politics and political machines
  • The Populist Movement and agrarian discontent
  • The Progressive Era (1890-1920)
    • an effort to deal with the adverse effects of industrial capitalism
    • the Progressive Presidents
  • The Indian Plains Wars (through 1890)
  • Spanish-American War (1898)
  • IMPERIALISM: Philippines, Hawaii, Panama, Cuba, etc.
  • World War I
    • causes/effects
    • the home front
  • The Red Scare
  • The 1920s
    • sources of conflict (economic, political, and social)
    • effects on women, African Americans, and immigrants
  • The 1930s, the Great Depression, and the New Deal
    • Hoover vs. FDR
    • economic, social, and political reforms
  • World War II
    • results, the home front
    • effects on women, African Americans, Native Americans (Navajo codetalkers, etc), Japanese Americans, and Mexican Americans
  • The Cold War
    • foreign policy
      • where and when
    • 1950s
      • conformity, suburbs, Baby Boom, domestication of women, challenges to conformity, expanding economy, consumer culture
      • similarities to the 1920s
    • 1960s
      • civil rights movement (who, what, when, where, why, successes and failures)
      • Lyndon B. Johnson and the Great Society (1963-1968)
        • domestic and foreign issues
    • 1970s
      • Richard Nixon (1968-1973)
        • foreign and domestic policies
        • detente and Vietnam
        • the Southern Strategy and Watergate
    • 1980s
      • Ronald Reagan (1981-1989)
        • foreign and domestic policies
        • tax cuts
        • military spending
        • shrinking of the government
        • the new right
      • George H.W. Bush and the end of the Cold War
  • Bill Clinton and Barack Obama
About the cornrows thing...

It really was never about the hair.

Originally posted by mtv

The core of Amandla’s discussion about cultural appropriation had barely settled on America’s consciousness, much less our subconsciousness before this happened…..

and then swiftly this happened.

This “conversation” between 16 year old Stenberg and the now 18 year old Jenner caused a huge uproar. Immediately Amandla not only was accused of being a race baiter and of being the stereotypical “angry black girl” she also became Andy Cohen’s “jackhole of the day” for her counter of Kylie’s cornrows. Many people were astounded that this situation was all about hair. Anyone should be allowed to wear their hair in any fashion they want. Even the styles that have been traditionally worn by black women and girls for decades. The styles that have been worn traditionally by black women and girls for decades, primarily for function, secondarily for fashion. The styles didn’t seem to be on anyones radar or worthy of praise until Miley,or Iggy, Kendall Jenner started wearing them.

 When Amandla Stenberg called out Kylie Jenner’s cultural appropriation many came to her defense. Cries of: shes young (she had allegedly been in a relationship with a now 25 year old man since she was 16), “shes just trying to figure it out” the words of Justin Bieber, and that shes can do whatever she wants flooded the interwebs as the dispute between the girls became the highest trending hashtag.

I agree everyone should be allowed to wear their hair the way they want. A London boy in 2011 shouldn’t have been sent home because his cornrows were believed to be too closely associated with London’s gang culture. White children were also prevented from shaving their heads for fear of its association to skinheads.  

7 year old Tiana Parker should not have had to leave school because of her hair in 2013. She had attended her school for a year before her dreadlocks caused an issue.12 year old Vanessa VanDyke should not have been threatened with expulsion for wearing her hair in the natural form that grew out of her head. 

A Native American boy, 5 years old, was sent home on his first day of kindergarten because his traditional braids did not meet the required dress code for little boys. 

Okay…clearly the issue also lies in the school dress code policies. Policies that seem to make it very difficult for children of color or of other cultures to wear their hair in anyway that is different from their straight haired counterparts.  So no, Amandla’s comment was not a jab at Kylie but instead were the actions of a young woman trying to inform a privileged, young, soon to be adult celebrity with a massive fan base of impresionable individuals, to not be so careless and ignorant to the value that has historically been placed on hair and hairstyles by other cultures. It is possible to appreciate that culture without appropriating it.

  After these events I imagine that amandla would have had one last question:

What would America be like if we, as a society, defended the freedom of children of any and all color to be who they are the same way we defend  young girls/women, like Kylie Jenner, to do what they want? 

UPDATE

Vanessa was featured on the real 11/13/2015 and her Afro still looks amazing.

I’m Jewish and I will always fight against racism in all of its forms.

“…צֶ֥דֶק צֶ֖דֶק תִּרְדֹּ֑ף“  “Justice, Justice you shall pursue…” (Deut. 16:20)

Justice is a central tenant of Jewish tradition.  The above verse from Deuteronomy is recited following every recitation of the books of the Torah each year in order to remind us of the injustices of our world.  Justice goes beyond simply loving our neighbors as commanded in Leviticus 19: 17-18, as it is the injustices that we have faced throughout Jewish history which continue to further our commitment to social change. 

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heshel famously prayed with his feet, when marching with other famous Civil Rights leaders in the mid-twentieth century.  As Jews, we will continue to fight for justice for all people because tolerance will bring about the gift of shalom, of peace.

Mary Edmonia Lewis (c. July 4, 1844 – September 17, 1907) was an American sculptor who worked for most of her career in Rome, Italy. She was the first woman of African-American and Native American heritage to achieve international fame and recognition as a sculptor in the fine arts world. Her work is known for incorporating themes relating to black people and indigenous peoples of the Americas into Neoclassical style sculpture. She began to gain prominence during the American Civil War, and by the end of the 19th century, she was the only black woman who had participated in and been recognized to any degree by the American artistic mainstream. In 2002, the scholar Molefi Kete Asante listed Edmonia Lewis on his list of 100 Greatest African Americans.

Hoodoo =/= Voodoo
  • Hoodoo= various eclectic forms of African American witchcraft that draws from traditional African, Native American and even Christian religious and spiritual practice. Also commonly known as root work  and conjuring.
  • Voodoo=a religion based around the West African Vodun tradition brought by West African slaves involving specific deities and religious ceremonies and worship.  Priests and priestesses would invoke these deities to perform spells and magic for their clients and followers.

Voodoo is a closed religious practice (though I know that there are priests in the US who teach and initiate interested parties.)

Hoodoo is a term for various magical practices from many religious backgrounds and can be studied and practiced by any interested party, though I would be sure to check your sources as with all magical research.

White History Month

A Caucasian co-worker and I(Yup! The same one from the last post. Go figure.) were discussing why there should or shouldn’t be a “White History Month”. Nevermind the fact that EVERY MONTH is White History month. But I decided to humor him and play along…

“There should be White History Month” so we can expose all the evil things white folks have done in history and present that still affect the victims and their descendants till this very day like:

1 Cherokee Trail of Tears
2 Japanese American internment
3 Philippine-American War
4 Jim Crow
5 The genocide of Native Americans
6 Transatlantic slave trade, and the lies that Africans sold other Africans into slavery
7 The Middle Passage
8 The history of White American racism
9 Black Codes
10 Slave patrols
11 Ku Klux Klan
12 The War on Drugs
13 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
14 How white racism grew out of slavery and genocide
15 How whites still benefit from slavery and genocide
16 White anti-racism
17 The Southern strategy
18 The rape of enslaved women
19 Madison Grant
20 The Indian Wars
21 Human zoos
22 How the Jews became white
23 White flight
24 Redlining
25 Proposition 14
26 Homestead Act
27 Tulsa Riots
28 Rosewood massacre
29 Tuskegee Experiment
30 Lynching
31 Hollywood stereotypes
32 Indian Appropriations Acts
33 Immigration Act of 1924
34 Sundown towns
35 Chinese Exclusion Act
36 Emmett Till
37 Vincent Chin
38 Islamophobia
39 Indian boarding schools
40 King Philip’s War
41 Bacon’s Rebellion
42 American slavery compared to Arab, Roman and Latin American slavery
43 History of the gun
44 History of the police
45 History of prisons
46 History of white suburbia
47 Lincoln’s racism and anti-racism
48 George Wallace Governor of Alabama
49 Cointelpro
50 Real estate steering
51 School tracking
52 Mass incarceration of black men
53 Boston school busing riots
54 Man made Ebola and A.I.D.S.
55 Church Bombings and fires in deep south to Blacks
56 Church Shootings
57 How the Irish and Italians became white
58 The Perpetuation of the idea of the “model minority”
59 Housing discrimination
60 Systematic placement of highways and building projects to create ghettos
61. Medical experimentation on poor poc especially Blacks including surgical and gynecological experimentation
62 History of Planned Parenthood
63 Forced Sterilization
64 Cutting children out of pregnant Black mothers as part of lynchings
65 Eurocentric beauty standard falsification
66 Erasure and eradication of all achievements of Ancient Africa and Kemet
67 White washing of history and cultural practices of poc’s
68 Media manipulation and bias
69 Perpetuation of the myth of reverse racism
70 The history of white cannibalism
71 White fragility
72 White on white crime and white on everybody else crime
73 Irish slavery, Jewish slavery, African slavery, Native American slavery
74 White police officers murdering unarmed men, women, and children and not being convicted for it
75 Population control warfares worldwide
76 Chemtrails
77 Oil spills and chemical dumping in oceans worldwide
78 Water fracking
79 Gmo foods worldwide
80 Monsanto
81 World Wars 1 and 2
82 Wars on indigenous peoples throughout the world
83 Stolen inventions and blueprints from African people and other indigenous people worldwide
84 Steal concepts from cultures worldwide and then corrupt it
85 Mass murders and massacres worldwide
86 Eugenics and the history of sterilization of poc and history of fetal abortions worldwide
87. Flint Michigan water poisoning crisis

and too much more….

Yet you all have convinced the world and your delusional selves that melanated human beings “black” people are perceived as dangerous, unruly, racist, uncivilized, thugs, gangsters etc… Yeah ok not according to historical and present day facts.

Needless to say… We don’t have these types of discussions anymore. 😎😉😂

7

I was feeling myself the other day. My hair, my lips, my eyes, my overalls.
FEELING IT

TELL. YOUR. FRIENDS.

Bessie Coleman became the first African American woman to hold a pilot license, which she achieved in 1921. While working out in the cotton fields as a young girl in Texas, she always dreamed that one day she would be able to fly an airplane. As she got older, she realised that this wouldn’t be an easy feat. At the time, African Americans, Native Americans, not women were able to attend flight schools in the United States. However, Bessie saved enough money to travel to France where she eventually earned her pilot license. Shortly after her return to the United States, she became a stunt flier and performed for audiences. In 1922, she was dubbed as “the worlds greatest woman flier,” at an American air show.

Her lifelong dream was to establish a flying shook for young African American aviators who wanted to follow in her footsteps but didn’t have the money to travel to a european flight school. Unfortunately, she would not live long enough to achieve this dream. On 30 April, 1926, Bessie’s Curtiss JN-4 went into an unexpected dive and spin and threw her flying from the plane at 2,000 foot. She died as soon as she hit the ground.

How to make America Great in 16 easy steps

1. I M P E A C H. T R U M P. self explanatory

2. Stop 👏🏾letting 👏🏾billionaires 👏🏾rig 👏🏾elections


Overturn Citizens United, ban campaign contributions and let one voice equal one vote


3. Stop spending 50% of all our tax money on war.

Stop killing civilians in the Middle East, and use the extra trillion dollars to reinvest in the Arab world, America’s urban and rural schools, and make college free.

4. LET REFUGEES AND IMMIGRANTS IN!

Refugees and immigrants are usually skilled, open businesses, create innovation and grow the economy. They are also HUMAN BEINGS fleeing war and death and need us to be there for them.

5. Stop putting (black and Latino) kids in prison for nonviolent drug offenses.

Start weakening gangs by legalizing drugs and offering addiction and job training programs.

*bonus: this also greatly reduces gun violence everywhere, especially in large cities*

6. don't👏🏾let👏🏾cops👏🏾get👏🏾away👏🏾with👏🏾shit👏🏾

Put murderers in jail, whether they have a badge or not. Demilitarize police forces, and train officers deescalation tactics. Make sure officers come from the communities they serve. Rebuild trust through human contact with police.

7. end the mass shooting™ Era.

Castrate the NRA. Create an Australia style gun buyback program. Stop letting 14 year olds buy AKs at guns shows. Mandate “safe gun” tech.

*hidden bonus: kindergarteners, churchgoers and the general public will no longer be murdered en masse on a monthly basis. How wacky is that?!?*

8. stop allowing people to go bankrupt because they got sick or hurt

Create a single payer health care system like those in Norway, New Zealand, Japan, the U.K.,
Kuwait, Sweden, Bahrain, Brunei, Canada, the Netherlands, Austria, The UAE, Finland, Slovenia, Denamark, Luxembourg, France, Australia, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Cyprus, Spain, South Korea, Hong Kong, and Singapore.

9. pay👏🏾women👏🏾the👏🏾same👏🏾amount👏🏾of👏🏾money👏🏾as👏🏾men👏🏾 yea like wtf? It’s 2017. 10. LET WOMEN HAVE CONTROL OVER THEIR OWN BODIES. Again, wtf?!?

11. Don’t let oil and gas companies destroy the Earth for profit.

Implement a carbon tax, and use the money to invest in renewables, and climate change research.

12. Create 25 million jobs, and revive the American Dream.

Spur a National WWII style mobilization to build renewable energy, manufacture electric cars, invest in organic vertical farming, and clean up our polluted oceans, Lakes and rivers.

*secret bonus: this also keeps our kids from having to live in a dystopian hellscape lol*

13. PAY REPARATIONS to African and Native Americans, just like you did to settlers and slaveowners before/after the Civil War.

14. Close Guantanamo bay, and amend the constitution to ban torture

15. Get Involved(cliche but immensely important) protest, call your representatives, and get involved with organizations like moveleft, Indivisible, and Justice Democrats that push for real and radical improvements to our country.

16. Don’t let cynicism and pessimism cloud your judgement.

If you’re reading this right now and thinking; “okay but nahhhhhhh, none of this can happen in America”, your brain is tricking you. Human evolutionary psychology makes it hard for people to envision a future that is radically different from the past or present, but change can happen fast and is often more radical than you expect. Don’t sit on the sidelines and let the future be decided by the likes of Trump, Bannon, and oil companies. speak up. ACT.

and most importantly,

VOTE

Brave Williams from New York is just 17 but is already 7ft 1 and growing

Towering over his teammates at 7ft 1in tall, 17-year-old Brave Williams is hoping his height can help propel him to sporting stardom.

The 400lb senior at Lake Shore High School in Angola, New York, is already a highly-regarded member of his high school basketball and American football teams.

And the youngster is now setting his sights on winning a much-coveted college athletic scholarship.

‘When I was five years old, I was like 5ft 3in.’

'The teachers thought I was actually a second grader, so they put me in the wrong class for about an hour before they realised their mistake.’

'I had to tell them that I was just starting school.’

However, Brave very nearly didn’t make it to even his first birthday - he had to be delivered via caesarian because the umbilical cord was wrapped around his neck.

'The doctors tried to pull me out three times before they were going to take more drastic measures. But as soon as my dad touched my mom’s forehead, I let go, and the doctors got me out,’ Brave told high school sports site MaxPreps.

'My dad instantly named me Brave because I needed a strong name.’

Specialists were concerned that he might be suffering from a form of gigantism known as Sotos syndrome, but tests done at three months and again at three years came back clear - much to the relief of his mother Angela.

She said: 'Every day he grew more and more, so that was when I got worried.

'To finally get the word that you have just got a tall kid was really relieving to say the least.’

Brave is now 7ft 1in tall - the same as Basketball Hall of Fame legend Shaquille O'Neal - but experts predict will be 7ft 5in by the time he stops growing, the same size as his great-great uncle.

Brave said: 'He made a pine tree look like a sapling. So, I think that’s where I got most of my height from.’

Born of African-American and Native American heritage, Brave lives on the Cattaraugus Reservation in the Seneca Nation of Indians.

The tall teen sleeps in a custom-made bed, although his feet still dangle off the end, and wears size 21 shoes.

While Brave’s size makes him killer on the court, it does also attract unwelcome attention in the form of stares and comments.

Mom Angela said: 'It was tough for me when my son turned five because then he had to go to school and I had to share him with the world.

'It was hard because he is sensitive and people stare, they look, they point.

'Now he’ll take the time to talk to everybody, people ask him the same questions over and over again - “How tall are you? Are you a wrestler? Are you this? Are you that?” And he just takes the time to respond, that’s his special gift.’

Brave is now determined to go on and become a pro athlete, but says he wants to go to college and complete his studies first - and would like to major in engineering.

And for 5ft 9in Angela, Brave’s stature is more than just an accident of genetics.

'I thought about my son being tall for a long time, and I think there is a reason why he’s so tall - because it gets him noticed and makes people listen to him,’ she added.

'But the rest is what matters, what really makes him special. I know he’s going to do big things.’

Source

anonymous asked:

hello! i was wondering if you knew any good resources about settler colonialism and antiblackness in the U.S and how these things relate to each other?

  Yup, so here’s a list of a few with a summary of the topic addressed (Links to the articles/books are provided if I have them)

Fanon, Frantz – Black Skin, White Masks - Addresses the effects of (settler) colonialism on Native Africans in Algeria. Also a ur-text for a lot of contemporary Black Studies literature.

Fanon, Frantz – The Wretched of the Earth - Addresses the effects and processes of colonialism and its intersection with anti-Blackness/White Supremacy.

King, Tiffany – “Labor’s Aphasia: Toward Antiblackness as Constitutive to Settler Colonialism”  - Amazing article discussing how the metaphysics of labor are disarticulated by Blackness and how anti-Blackness was a necessary part of settler colonialism.

King, Tiffany – “In the Clearing: Black Female Bodies, Space and Settler Colonial Landscapes” - Probably the best work in this list. King addresses how anti-Blackness shapes settler colonialism and how settler colonialism shapes anti-Blackness. It’s one of the better intersections of Black Studies and Native American Studies, in my opinion.

Sexton, Jared – “The Vel of Slavery: Tracking the Figure of the Unsovereign - Addresses the flaws in Native American Studies attempt to understand settler colonialism and how Blackness makes settler decolonization problematic. 

Wilderson, Frank B., III – Red, White, and Black: Cinema and the Structure of U.S. Antagonisms - Not all about the intersection, but the first three parts do address, to some degree, the intersections between Blackness and Redness.

Tuck, Eve, Allison Guess, and Hannah Sulton – “Not Nowhere: Collaborating on Selfsame Land”  - Interesting work on how Blackness can create a place of meaning. A work on the Black/Land Project.

Jackson, Shona N. - “Humanity Beyond the Regime of Labor: Antiblackness, Indigeneity, and the Legacies of Colonialism in the Caribbean” - Discusses how Black people can participate in anti-Red/Settler colonial systems and the problems of working through a labor discourse.

2

Edmonia Lewis (1844-1907) was a sculptor working mostly in the Neoclassical style, who was the first woman of African-American and Native American heritage to gain international fame in this art. She emerged as a figure in American mainstream art during the Civil War, and was the only black female artist recognized to any degree on the artistic scene.

She studied at Oberlin College, one of the first institutions to admit women and people of different ethnicities. She went on to begin a career in sculpting in Boston, and opened her studio to the public for her first solo exhibition in 1864. She later moved to Rome, Italy, where she created most of the works for which she became internationally known (such as Death of Cleopatra, photo above).