african american history'

(Original Caption) 06/30/1964-Omaha, NE: Malcolm X returned to his native Omaha for the first time to say that “in Omaha as in other places the Ku Klux Klan has just changed it’s bed sheets for policeman’s uniforms.” With Malcolm is the Rev. Rudolph McNair, Omaha leader of the Citizen’s Coordinating Committee for Civil Rights.

Hand-colored tintype portrait of three unidentified African American women, c. 1856.

Source: Harvard Library.

Can we talk about American Gods? We really have a dark-skin black woman playing a Biblical Queen and a Love Goddess. We have Black People portraying Egyptian Gods. The lead of the show is black. They have West African Gods being portrayed on mainstream media. Seeing black people’s mythology and history represented on screen by black actors is a big thing. People aren’t even aware of nor regard the several figures in Abrahamic religions being African. .

Black Women Are

Pioneers: Harriet Tubman

Originally posted by nyuniversity

Educated: 

Dr. Hadiya Nicole Green AKA  The Pioneer in the fight against cancer



Michelle Obama

Originally posted by theproblackgirl

Beautiful: Jackie Aina (She’s also artistic, intelligent, funny)

Originally posted by fuckyeahfemaleyoutubers

Uzo Aduba

Originally posted by theproblackgirl

Soulful: Chargaux 

Originally posted by thechronicleofshe

Nina Simone

Originally posted by rollingstone


Phenomenal:  Oprah  

Originally posted by larry-ride-or-die

Beyonce

Originally posted by aninounettear


Hilarious:  Leslie Jones 

Originally posted by teachingfeelslike

Gabourey Sidible

Originally posted by dailyahsgifs


Poetic: Maya Angelou

Lauryn Hill

Originally posted by hip-hop-fanatic

Confident: 

Marsai Martin

Originally posted by wildjay101

Solange Knowles 

Originally posted by amarachixxxiv

Yara Shahidi 

Originally posted by thepowerofblackwomen


Fearless: Assata Shakur & Angela Davis

Originally posted by ch-r-o-m-e

Originally posted by thesecrowns

Unwavering:   Lezley McSpadden, Gwen Carr, Wanda Johnson,  and Sybrina Fulton aka Mothers of The Movement

Fighters:  Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi aka founders of #BlackLivesMatter

Visionaries: Ava Duvernay (Director)

Shonda Rhimes (producer, screenwriter)

Determined: Ilhan Omar (Politician)

Originally posted by refinery29

Olympians:

Gabby Douglas

Originally posted by i-dont-understand-gymnastics

Simone Biles

Originally posted by sports-and-everything-else

Serena and Venus (and someone asking them a dumb question)

Originally posted by youreunattractiveinside

Allyson Fellix

Originally posted by bashfulhound

Ibtihaj Muhammad

Originally posted by womens-sports

Some Bonus Awesomeness:

Amber Riley

Originally posted by chichichichias

Kerry Washington, Taraji P Henson, and Mary J Blige 

Originally posted by alyandmatt

Janelle Monae 

Originally posted by tragedyb0ner

Despite being one of the most disrespected demographics, black women remain to be an integral part of America’s (and also global) history, present, and future. Validate, and humanize them. And take note of all the badassery and awesomeness. 


Originally posted by theblvckcool



Celebrating African-American Social Dance

This is the Bop. The Bop is a type of social dance. Dance is a language, and social dance is an expression that emerges from a community. A social dance isn’t choreographed by any one person. It can’t be traced to any one moment. Each dance has steps that everyone can agree on, but it’s about the individual and their creative identity Because of that, social dances bubble up, they change, and they spread like wildfire. They are as old as our remembered history.

In African-American social dances, we see over 200 years of how African and African-American traditions influenced our history. The present always contains the past. And the past shapes who we are and who we will be.

Now, social dance is about community and connection; if you knew the steps, it meant you belonged to a group. But what if it becomes a worldwide craze? Enter the Twist.

It’s no surprise that the Twist can be traced back to the 19th century, brought to America from the Congo during slavery. But in the late ‘50s, right before the Civil Rights Movement, the Twist is popularized by Chubby Checker and Dick Clark. Suddenly, everybody’s doing the Twist: white teenagers, kids in Latin America, making its way into songs and movies. Through social dance, the boundaries between groups become blurred.

The story continues in the 1980s and '90s. Along with the emergence of hip-hop, African-American social dance took on even more visibility, borrowing from its long past, shaping culture and being shaped by it. Today, these dances continue to evolve, grow and spread.

Why do we dance? To move, to let loose, to express.

Why do we dance together? To heal, to remember, to say: “We speak a common language. We exist and we are free.”

From the TED-Ed Lesson The history of African-American social dance - Camille A. Brown

Camille A. Brown is a choreographer fusing dance and social commentary to explore race, sexuality and femininity.

Title Design by Kozmonot Animation Studio 

This Day in History: Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United Sates. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation.