african american females

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Stephanie Johnson, Dawn Cook form Delta’s first all-black, all-women cockpit

  • Here’s some #BlackGirlMagic as Black History Month ends and Women’s History Month begins.
  • Delta pilots first officer Dawn Cook and captain Stephanie Johnson made history in late February. They were the two members of the first all-black, all women cockpit on a mainline Delta flight.
  • According to the Root, Cook and Johnson were flying the Airbus 320 from Detroit to Las Vegas on Feb. 26. Johnson also made history in the past by becoming Delta’s first female African-American captain.
  • Johnson said in her feature interview with Delta Airlines’ blog that she gained her interest in flying with the help and motivation from her high school physics teacher. Read more (3/6/17 10:54 AM)

follow @the-movemnt

Members of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion, the first all-African-American, all-female unit to serve overseas in World War II, take part in a parade ceremony in honor of Joan d'Arc at the marketplace where she was burned at the stake. Rouen, France. May 27, 1945.

(US National Archives)

In 1981, Alexa Canady became the first female African-American neurosurgeon in the US.

Dr. Canady holds two honorary degrees: a doctorate of humane letters from the University of Detroit-Mercy, awarded in 1997, and a doctor of science degree from the University of Southern Connecticut, awarded in 1999.

She received the Children’s Hospital of Michigan’s Teacher of the Year award in 1984, and was inducted into the Michigan Women’s Hall of Frame in 1989. In 1993, she received the American Medical Women’s Association President’s Award and in 1994 the Distinguished Service Award from Wayne State University Medical School.

In 2002, the Detroit News named her Michiganer of the Year.

Now, don’t ever say, you can’t do something because this woman literally has done the impossible!

#AlexaCanady
#BlackHistoryMonth

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Augusta Savage (1892–1962)

A prominent name in the Harlem Renaissance movement, Augusta Savage was not just an artist, but also an important Civil Rights activist.

While Augusta showed a passion for art at a very young age, her religious father disapproved greatly. She never let her family’s opinions deter her, as she continued to refine her talents and accepted encouragement elsewhere. Her talent and hardwork did not go ignored, as she enrolled in tuition-free Cooper Union and even received a scholarship which covered living expenses. However, as clearly gifted as Augusta was, many could not see past her race. After completing her schooling, she applied for an art program in France, and was rejected due to her race. Rather than let her set this back, she used her experience to draw attention to these hateful prejudices.

Augusta was finally able to travel and become even more well-known as she received fellowships and grants which allowed her to travel over Europe, later returning to a poor America as the Great Depression was in full effect. Commissions were lacking during this time, but it did not slow Augusta. She opened a studio in 1932, became the first black artist to join the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors, and was a founding member of the Harlem Artists’ Guild.

By the time of her death, in the 1960’s, Augusta Savage was almost completely forgotten and was far from a famous name at the time. Thankfully, she is remembered today for her Civil Rights achievements through art.

Above: Bust of Gwendolyn Knight, who was a close friend of Augusta, one of her most famous busts: Gamin (1929), and The Harp (1939). The Harp, also known as Lift Every Voice and Sing, was created for the 1939 New York World’s Fair. It was extremely popular, but was destroyed with the other installations at the end of the event.

This Week @ NASA

Astronauts conduct a spacewalk on the International Space Station to prepare it for future activities. Peggy Whitson became the new women’s record holder for number of spacewalks and more!

International Space Station

Work continued aboard the International Space Station. Spacewalkers Shane Kimbrough and Peggy Whitson used the station’s robotic arm to move the Pressurized Mating Adapter-3 on March 24 to move a module to accommodate U.S. commercial spacecraft carrying astronauts on future missions. They continued this work on March 30. Another spacewalk to complete the work is slated for April.

James Webb Space Telescope

Engineers at our Goddard Space Flight Center Center complete vibration and acoustic tesing on the James Webb Space Telescope, which was subjected to earsplitting noice and shaken 50-100 times per second to simulate the rigors of launch.

MAVEN

Data from our MAVEN, our Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, and published in the journal Science, concludes that solar wind and radiation are responsible for stripping Mars of its atmosphere and turning it into the frigid desert world it is today.

Most of the gas ever in the Red Planet’s atmosphere has been lost to space. The MAVEN team focused on the gas argon, estimating that 65% of it has been stripped from the planet. In 2015, the science team determined that atmospheric gas continues to be lost to space.

STEM Education

We participated in a Women’s History Month celebration and the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. The program feature NASA astronauts and engineers. The were also projects to get girls interested in sciene, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, education. There was also a screening of the film ‘Hidden Figures,’ which relates the story of African-American female mathematicians who were instrumental in the agency’s efforts to launch humans to space.

NASA App on Fire TV

We’ve released our latest free NASA app on a whole new platform–Amazon Fire TV! The app is already available for Apple TV, iOS, and Android.Viewers can stream NASA TV, access 16,000+, download video and more!

Download the app: www.nasa.gov/nasaapp

What the full episode of This Week @ NASA:

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

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“My mother used to tell me, ‘You may be the first to do many things, but make sure you’re not the last.’ I feel a responsibility to show young women what’s possible and to mentor them to own their power and fulfill their promise.”

- Kamala Harris is California’s first female, African-American, and Asian-American Attorney General and is aiming to become the first African-American female senator in almost 20 years.

Check out the in-depth Q&A with Kamala below!

Keep reading

Kill Zone - Prologue

Characters: Reader ( Special Agent Y/N Singer), Special Agent Castiel Novak, Dean Winchester, Cindy Stevenson (OC), Ella McKenzie (OC), Agent Samuel Campbell, Agent Crowley MacLeod,    

Pairing: AU Dean x Reader (eventually)

Warnings: Blood, violence, injuries, torture (not overly graphic), murder, character deaths  

Word Count: 2000ish

A/N: This is a serial killer AU of sorts. Not the typical kind, but it has all the death and violence these kinda AU bring with it. It was sorta inspired by Criminal Minds, and that is why my agents are profilers.

This series will have deaths, violence, love, heartwarming moments and everything in between. I am hereby warning you for yet another rollercoaster ride led by me ;)

Thanks to the amazing @percywinchester27 for being my advisor and beta on this one.

Technical Terms: MO: An offender’s method of carrying out an offense

MASTERLIST

Cindy was running as if her life depended on it, because it did. The branches snapped under her bare feet. The sharp rocks dug into her skin like razors each time she fell, but every time she got back up. Blood was soaking through her shirt and jeans from the wounds where his knife had pierced her flesh. Her racing heart was pumping her blood faster through her veins, causing the blood to escape her body even faster, and making her head spin.

I don’t wanna die. I don’t wanna die.

The words repeated themselves over and over again in her mind, like a chant, as she tried to get away from her kidnapper. Her kidnapper, who had set her free. Who had instructed her to run, before slowly walking off in the opposite direction, carrying his rifle over his shoulder.

She had cried and begged for her life, screaming till her throat was sore and hoarse, but he hadn’t turned around. He hadn’t worthied her a second glance, so she had done the only thing her exhausted and befuddled mind had let her. She had ran.

Keep reading

Happy Women Physicians Day!

I owe an incalculable debt to all the amazing women who came before me and paved my path. 

A selection of my personal heroes, in order of their birth year: 

Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to receive a medical degree in America. 

Dr. Dorthy Reed Mendenhall, the woman who discovered Hodgkin’s Disease is not in fact a type of TB by discovering the eponymous Reed-Sternberg cell. 

Dr. Helen B. Taussig, pioneer in the field of pediatric cardiology despite her considerable hearing loss. 

Dr. Gisella Perl, a Jewish gynecologist who was interned at Auschwitz and saved the lives of hundreds of women through great determination and sacrifice.

Dr. Virginia Apgar, an anesthesiologist who developed the Apgar Score we all know and love, improving mother and infant mortality rate in America by pushing obstetricians to do better. 

Dr. Frances Oldham Kelsey, the Canadian pharmacologist and physician who blocked the approval of thalidomide by the FDA and thus prevented a potentially massive wave of birth defects in the US. 

 Dr. Joycelyn Elders, first African American female Surgeon General of the United States, who never shied away from controversial topics like drug legalization or human sexuality if she believed it would improve the overall health of the nation. 

Maya Angelou

Text from Bad Girls Throughout History by Ann Shen

Many consider Maya Angelou (1928–2014) a U.S. national treasure. A writer, activist, filmmaker, actor, and lecturer well into her eighties, Angelou transcended her humble upbringing in deeply racist Arkansas to create a vast body of work that helped to change the landscape of American culture. After a traumatic childhood event that she would later chronicle in her game-changing memoir, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Angelou became extraordinarily gifted in arts and literature and earned a scholarship to a San Francisco high school. As a teen, she became the first African-American female cable car conductor in San Francisco. She became a mom at sixteen and married a Greek aspiring musician, flouting the existing laws forbidding interracial marriage. Angelou studied dance with legendary choreographer Alvin Ailey and became a staple on the calypso music and dance scene as a performer. She also toured Europe with a production of the opera Porgy and Bess. After meeting novelist John Oliver Killens in 1959, she joined the Harlem Writers Guild and published her first written work. She became a civil rights activist and worked alongside Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X. Angelou would go on to write thirty-six books, earning the honor of both being on the banned books list and holding the record for the longest-running nonfiction book on The New York Times’ bestseller list.

In addition to roles in producing, writing, and directing film and television, Angelou became the first African-American woman to pen a screenplay that was actually made into a film, the Pulitzer Prize–nominated Georgia, Georgia. She won three Grammys for her spoken word albums, served on two presidential committees, and became the first female poet to compose and recite a poem for a presidential inauguration (President  Bill Clinton’s in 1993). Showered with accolades at the end of her life, Angelou was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor, by President Barack Obama in 2010. Angelou was fittingly recognized in her lifetime for her work that opened America’s hearts and minds.