african activists

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Malcolm X with his daughter Qubilah Shabazz in Harlem on February 20, 1965.  

He was assassinated the next day at the Audubon Ballroom in front of his wife and children.

(Photos by Duilio Pallottelli)

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The bourgeoisie is fearful of the militancy of the Negro woman, and for good reason. The capitalists know, far better than many progressives seem to know, that once Negro women begin to take action, the militancy of the whole Negro people, and thus of the anti-imperialist coalition, is greatly enhanced.
(Claudia Jones. 1915-1965)


Claudia Jones, Daughters of Africa: An International Anthology of Words and Writings by Women of African Descent, ed. Margaret Busby (Vintage edition, 199), 262.

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Bayard Rustin - The Gay Civil Rights Leader

Bayard Rustin was the heart and soul of the black civil rights movement in the United States, He was Martin Luther King Jr.s chef organizer, the pioneer of nonviolent resistance, and the man behind the march on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, during which Dr.King delivered his momentous and influential “I Have a Dream” speech. Rustin’s open homosexuality was contentious, and to this day his impact on the American landscape is all too often overlooked.

Lucy Hicks Anderson

Though she was assigned male at birth, when she entered school she began wearing dresses & calling herself Lucy. Physicians advised her mother to raise her as a girl. In a time, most people weren’t discussing gender identity or expression. They certainly didn’t have language like transgender to describe identity or the medical structure to support medical or legal transition. In 1944 she married Reuben Anderson, a soldier stationed at New York. She was charged with perjury because she was assigned male at birth. The belief was that she committed perjury when she signed the application for a marriage license .She was convicted and placed on probation for 10 years, successfully avoiding a prison sentence. During her perjury trial she was quoted for saying, “I defy any doctor in the world to prove that I am not a woman. I have lived, dressed, acted just what I am, a woman.” Lucy Hicks Anderson was a pioneer in the fight for marriage equality. She spent nearly sixty years living as a woman. And she made history by fighting for the legal right to be herself with the man she loved

Unita Blackwell (b. 1933) is the first African-American woman to be elected as mayor in the state of Mississippi. She is a civil rights activist who helped organize voters in the state.

She worked as a project director for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, as well as a community development specialist with the National Council of Negro Women, working on projects for low-income housing. As mayor of Mayersville, she secured funds for infrastructure and accommodation across the city.

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Malcolm X with his wife, Betty Shabazz, and their children during a meeting at the headquarters of his Organization of Afro-American Unity at Hotel Theresa in Harlem on February 20, 1965.

Malcolm is holding his daughter Qubilah. He was assassinated the next day at the Audubon Ballroom in front of his wife and children.

(Photos by Duilio Pallottelli)

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Elaine Brown, Former Leader, Black Panther Party (The Summer of Love: How Hippies Changed the World)

“ I wanted to be white. Like so many black people do, but they’re not prepared to make that confession.”  

Regarding the above quote, I wasn’t sure if she meant just African Americans or if she had travelled all over the world and met many black people, and had projected her views onto them.  I can only speak for myself and say I have never wanted to be white.

Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) was an American educator, stateswoman, philanthropist, humanitarian and civil rights activist. She was a national advisor to President Franklin D. Roosevelt and was acknowledged by both President Calvin Coolidge and President Herbert Hoover for her knowledge on child welfare.

Mary’s parents were former slaves, but she was able to go to college with the help of benefactors.  After she was told that black missionaries were not needed, she started teaching, and set up a private school for African-American students in Daytona Beach (Florida) to promote education of African-Americans. Using donations she developed the school into a college and later into a university.

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February 11th 1990: Mandela released

On this day in 1990, the South African activist and politician Nelson Mandela was released from prison. Mandela had spent twenty-seven years in prison for his role as an anti-apartheid activist at the head of Umkhonto we Sizwe, which translates as Spear of the Nation. The controversial organisation served as the militant armed wing of the African National Congress political party, born out of a frustration among anti-apartheid activists that their non-violence was met with brutality by white authorities against black citizens. Mandela was arrested in 1962 and sentenced to life in prison, during which time he was largely condemned as a terrorist by Western nations. He served most of his twenty-seven years on Robben Island, then Victor Verster Prison near Cape Town, and during his imprisonment his reputation grew as a significant black leader both in South Africa and internationally. Mandela was finally freed after the ban on the ANC was lifted by the apartheid government. Upon his release, Mandela led the ANC in the successful negotiations with President F.W. de Klerk to end apartheid, and was overwhelmingly elected President of South Africa in the first multi-racial elections in 1994, serving until 1999. In 2013, Nelson Mandela died aged 95 and has been mourned around the world as a hero who fought for freedom in South Africa, and as a symbol of resistance for oppressed peoples everywhere.

“Our march to freedom is irreversible. We must not allow fear to stand in our way.”

medium.com
What’s In Store For The Get Down Part 2?
The Get Down is set in the South Bronx in New York and revolves around these teens who change the city through their music, dance and…
By NPOC

SOME HIGHLIGHTS :

For Shaolin, all his efforts in Part 2 are about keeping Zeke close to him and keeping The Get Down Brothers together. That’s his life, that’s his whole world, and he will do anything to keep what’s his. Because without Zeke and The Get Down Brothers, he’s all alone. And Shaolin can’t handle that.

[…]And YES, Dizzee isn’t the only character who is gay. Hopefully we’ll get to show that if we’re allowed to continue!

Everybody loves Regina! We love her too. She and Yolanda are definitely present in Part 2 and we learn more about them, but we will have to wait for Season Two to get some more substantial story lines for both of them.

There are characters who never made it into Season One who I would love to bring into Season Two. There is, for example, a charismatic African-American community activist named Kofi Quantay who could play a big role in Season 2. He’s like a Black Jesus, and he would bring more consciousness & street politics into the show. Also, I love all the supporting characters in Season One. I’d like to tell more about Boo Boo and Rah Rah. And Yolanda and Regina. And of course, if The Get Down Brothers continue to rise, there are a million great stories to incorporate that coincide with the birth of Hip Hop.


CONCLUSION : WATCH THE GET DOWN PART 1 AND 2 SO THAT WE CAN HAVE A SEASON 2 AND THUS : MORE CONFIRMED GAY CHARACTERS, MORE BACKSTORIES AND DEVELOPMENT FOR SECONDARY CHARACTERS, AND NEW INTERESTING CHARACTERS.

Mabel Hampton

Mabel Hampton was a famous African-American lesbian activist. She was a dancer in New York City in the 1920s, where she starred in all-black productions during the Harlem Renaissance. Mabel Hampton was in a romantic relationship with Lillian Foster, for 46 years until Foster’s death. 

On a meager income, she managed to make many financial contributions to many gay and lesbian organizations.  Hampton collected memorabilia, letters, and other records documenting her history, providing a window into the lives of black women and lesbians during the Harlem Renaissance. She left a legacy of invaluable archival materials to the Lesbian Herstory Archives. She also marched in the first National Gay and Lesbian March on Washington. Then in 1984, she spoke before thousands of onlookers at New York City Lesbian and Gay Pride Parade, where, she is quoted as saying, “I, Mabel Hampton, have been a lesbian all my life, for 82 years, and I am proud of myself and my people. I would like all my people to be free in this country and all over the world, my gay people and my black people.”

time.com
Has anyone read this? The history of Black people and Asian Americans being allies has been lost.

One possible answer could be found in the model minority myth. The myth, a decades-old stereotype, casts Asian-Americans as universally successful, and discourages others — even Asian-Americans themselves — from believing in the validity of their struggles. But as protests over Ferguson continue, it’s increasingly important to remember the purpose of the model minority narrative’s construction. The doctored portrayal, which dates to 1966, was intended to shame African-American activists whose demands for equal civil rights threatened a centuries-old white society.

“The model minority discourse has elevated Asian-Americans as a group that’s worked hard, using education to get ahead,” said Daryl Maeda, a professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder. “But the reality is that it’s a discourse that intends to pit us against other people of color. And that’s a divide and conquer strategy we shouldn’t be complicit with.”

An important read. Thanks so much for the submission @lkeke35!