african activists

2

The bourgeoisie is fearful of the militancy of the Negro woman, and for good reason. The capitalists know, far better than many progressives seem to know, that once Negro women begin to take action, the militancy of the whole Negro people, and thus of the anti-imperialist coalition, is greatly enhanced.
(Claudia Jones. 1915-1965)


Claudia Jones, Daughters of Africa: An International Anthology of Words and Writings by Women of African Descent, ed. Margaret Busby (Vintage edition, 199), 262.

Lucy Hicks Anderson

Though she was assigned male at birth, when she entered school she began wearing dresses & calling herself Lucy. Physicians advised her mother to raise her as a girl. In a time, most people weren’t discussing gender identity or expression. They certainly didn’t have language like transgender to describe identity or the medical structure to support medical or legal transition. In 1944 she married Reuben Anderson, a soldier stationed at New York. She was charged with perjury because she was assigned male at birth. The belief was that she committed perjury when she signed the application for a marriage license .She was convicted and placed on probation for 10 years, successfully avoiding a prison sentence. During her perjury trial she was quoted for saying, “I defy any doctor in the world to prove that I am not a woman. I have lived, dressed, acted just what I am, a woman.” Lucy Hicks Anderson was a pioneer in the fight for marriage equality. She spent nearly sixty years living as a woman. And she made history by fighting for the legal right to be herself with the man she loved

Unita Blackwell (b. 1933) is the first African-American woman to be elected as mayor in the state of Mississippi. She is a civil rights activist who helped organize voters in the state.

She worked as a project director for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, as well as a community development specialist with the National Council of Negro Women, working on projects for low-income housing. As mayor of Mayersville, she secured funds for infrastructure and accommodation across the city.

3

February 11th 1990: Mandela released

On this day in 1990, the South African activist and politician Nelson Mandela was released from prison. Mandela had spent twenty-seven years in prison for his role as an anti-apartheid activist at the head of Umkhonto we Sizwe, which translates as Spear of the Nation. The controversial organisation served as the militant armed wing of the African National Congress political party, born out of a frustration among anti-apartheid activists that their non-violence was met with brutality by white authorities against black citizens. Mandela was arrested in 1962 and sentenced to life in prison, during which time he was largely condemned as a terrorist by Western nations. He served most of his twenty-seven years on Robben Island, then Victor Verster Prison near Cape Town, and during his imprisonment his reputation grew as a significant black leader both in South Africa and internationally. Mandela was finally freed after the ban on the ANC was lifted by the apartheid government. Upon his release, Mandela led the ANC in the successful negotiations with President F.W. de Klerk to end apartheid, and was overwhelmingly elected President of South Africa in the first multi-racial elections in 1994, serving until 1999. In 2013, Nelson Mandela died aged 95 and has been mourned around the world as a hero who fought for freedom in South Africa, and as a symbol of resistance for oppressed peoples everywhere.

“Our march to freedom is irreversible. We must not allow fear to stand in our way.”

medium.com
What’s In Store For The Get Down Part 2?
The Get Down is set in the South Bronx in New York and revolves around these teens who change the city through their music, dance and…
By NPOC

SOME HIGHLIGHTS :

For Shaolin, all his efforts in Part 2 are about keeping Zeke close to him and keeping The Get Down Brothers together. That’s his life, that’s his whole world, and he will do anything to keep what’s his. Because without Zeke and The Get Down Brothers, he’s all alone. And Shaolin can’t handle that.

[…]And YES, Dizzee isn’t the only character who is gay. Hopefully we’ll get to show that if we’re allowed to continue!

Everybody loves Regina! We love her too. She and Yolanda are definitely present in Part 2 and we learn more about them, but we will have to wait for Season Two to get some more substantial story lines for both of them.

There are characters who never made it into Season One who I would love to bring into Season Two. There is, for example, a charismatic African-American community activist named Kofi Quantay who could play a big role in Season 2. He’s like a Black Jesus, and he would bring more consciousness & street politics into the show. Also, I love all the supporting characters in Season One. I’d like to tell more about Boo Boo and Rah Rah. And Yolanda and Regina. And of course, if The Get Down Brothers continue to rise, there are a million great stories to incorporate that coincide with the birth of Hip Hop.


CONCLUSION : WATCH THE GET DOWN PART 1 AND 2 SO THAT WE CAN HAVE A SEASON 2 AND THUS : MORE CONFIRMED GAY CHARACTERS, MORE BACKSTORIES AND DEVELOPMENT FOR SECONDARY CHARACTERS, AND NEW INTERESTING CHARACTERS.

10

Bayard Rustin - The Gay Civil Rights Leader

Bayard Rustin was the heart and soul of the black civil rights movement in the United States, He was Martin Luther King Jr.s chef organizer, the pioneer of nonviolent resistance, and the man behind the march on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, during which Dr.King delivered his momentous and influential “I Have a Dream” speech. Rustin’s open homosexuality was contentious, and to this day his impact on the American landscape is all too often overlooked.

Mary Ann Shadd (1823-1893) was the first black female publisher in the United States, and the first female publisher in Canada. She was a devoted abolitionist, and also a journalist, teacher, and lawyer.

Fleeing from the United States under the threat of recapture for former slaves, she settled in Ontario and founded a racially integrated school. She then travelled around Canada and USA promoting full racial integration and education. From 1853, she ran an anti-slavery newspaper called The Provincial Freeman, which made her the first female African-American newspaper editor in North America.

Mabel Hampton

Mabel Hampton was a famous African-American lesbian activist. She was a dancer in New York City in the 1920s, where she starred in all-black productions during the Harlem Renaissance. Mabel Hampton was in a romantic relationship with Lillian Foster, for 46 years until Foster’s death. 

On a meager income, she managed to make many financial contributions to many gay and lesbian organizations.  Hampton collected memorabilia, letters, and other records documenting her history, providing a window into the lives of black women and lesbians during the Harlem Renaissance. She left a legacy of invaluable archival materials to the Lesbian Herstory Archives. She also marched in the first National Gay and Lesbian March on Washington. Then in 1984, she spoke before thousands of onlookers at New York City Lesbian and Gay Pride Parade, where, she is quoted as saying, “I, Mabel Hampton, have been a lesbian all my life, for 82 years, and I am proud of myself and my people. I would like all my people to be free in this country and all over the world, my gay people and my black people.”

What’s In Store For The Get Down Part 2?

Read under the ‘Keep Reading’ or on NerdyPOC’s Medium

The Get Down is set in the South Bronx in New York and revolves around these teens who change the city through their music, dance and graffiti. It gained popularity on Tumblr and Twitter after many had pointed out how a show full of diversity and incredible storytelling was being sidelined for shows that did not break the status quo. Many feared last year that due to the ratings not being as high as some of the other Netflix hits such as ‘Stranger Things’ that we wouldn’t get more episodes but that fear was dispelled when we got a trailer for Part 2 last week.

Keep reading

W. E. B. Du Bois, the African-American thinker and activist whose writings influenced generations of freedom fighters, was born on February 23 in 1868, 149 years ago. While nearly a century and a half has passed since Du Bois’ birth, many of his writings still feel as relevant today as they did in the early 20th century. Here are some quotes from Du Bois, coupled with our images of him from the Photographs and Prints Division at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

Amy Ashwood-Garvey (January 10, 1897- May 3, 1969)- Marcus Garvey’s First Wife, Jamaican-born  Pan-African activist, feminist, director of the Black Star Steamship Line Corporation, and founder of the Negro World Newspaper. (read complete bio at Wikipedia)

8

It has been a few months since I’ve posted. I’ve been teaching for the summer in California. I’m going back home to Philadelphia in a week and I’m moving to Atlanta in two weeks.

Android Oshún, the Africana WomaNINJA is back.

Ida B. Wells

Civil Rights Activist, Journalist (1862–1931)

Ida B. Wells was an African-American journalist and activist who led an anti-lynching crusade in the United States in the 1890s. 

Born a slave in 1862, Ida Bell Wells was the oldest daughter of James and Lizzie Wells. The Wells family, as well as the rest of the slaves of the Confederate states, were decreed free by the Union, about six months after Ida’s birth, thanks to the Emancipation Proclamation. However, living in Mississippi as African Americans, they faced racial prejudices and were restricted by discriminatory rules and practices. 

On one fateful train ride from Memphis to Nashville, in May 1884, Wells reached a personal turning point. Having bought a first-class train ticket to Nashville, she was outraged when the train crew ordered her to move to the car for African Americans, and refused on principle. As she was forcibly removed from the train, she bit one of the men on the hand. Wells sued the railroad, winning a $500 settlement in a circuit court case. However, the decision was later overturned by the Tennessee Supreme Court.

This injustice led Ida B. Wells to pick up a pen to write about issues of race and politics in the South. Using the moniker “Iola,” a number of her articles were published in black newspapers and periodicals. Wells eventually became an owner of the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight, and, later, of the Free Speech.

While working as a journalist and publisher, Wells also held a position as a teacher in a segregated public school in Memphis. She became a vocal critic of the condition of blacks only schools in the city. In 1891, she was fired from her job for these attacks. She championed another cause after the murder of a friend and his two business associates.

In 1892, three African-American men—Tom Moss, Calvin McDowell and Will Stewart—set up a grocery store in Memphis. Their new business drew customers away from a white-owned store in the neighborhood, and the white store owner and his supporters clashed with the three men on a few occasions. One night, Moss and the others guarded their store against attack and ended up shooting several of the white vandals. They were arrested and brought to jail, but they didn’t have a chance to defend themselves against the charges—a lynch mob took them from their cells and murdered them.

These brutal killings incensed Wells, leading to her write articles decrying the lynching of her friend and the wrongful deaths of other African Americans. Putting her own life at risk, she spent two months traveling in the South, gathering information on other lynching incidents. One editorial seemed to push some of the city’s whites over the edge. A mob stormed the office of her newspaper, destroying all of her equipment. Fortunately, Wells had been traveling to New York City at the time. She was warned that she would be killed if she ever returned to Memphis.

Staying in the North, Wells wrote an in-depth report on lynching in America for the New York Age, an African-American newspaper run by former slave T. Thomas Fortune. She lectured abroad in 1893, looking to drum up support for her cause among reform-minded whites. Upset by the ban on African-American exhibitors at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, Wells penned and circulated a pamphlet entitled “The Reason Why the Colored American Is Represented in the World’s Columbian Exposition.” This effort was funded and supported by famed abolitionist and freed slave Frederick Douglass, and lawyer and editor Ferdinand Barnett. Also in 1893, Wells published A Red Record, a personal examination of lynchings in America.

In 1898, Wells brought her anti-lynching campaign to the White House, leading a protest in Washington, D.C., and calling for President William McKinley to make reforms. 

Ida B. Wells established several civil rights organizations. In 1896, she formed the National Association of Colored Women. After brutal assaults on the African-American community in Springfield, Illinois, in 1908, Wells sought to take action: The following year, she attended a special conference for the organization that would later become known as the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Though she is considered a founding member of the NAACP, Wells later cut ties with the organization; she explained her decision thereafter, stating that she felt the organization—in its infacy at the time she left—had lacked action-based initiatives.

Working on behalf of all women, Wells, as part of her work with the National Equal Rights League, called for President Woodrow Wilson to put an end to discriminatory hiring practices for government jobs. She created the first African-American kindergarten in her community and fought for women’s suffrage. In 1930, Wells made an unsuccessful bid for the state senate. Health problems plagued her the following year.

Ida B. Wells died of kidney disease on March 25, 1931, at the age of 68, in Chicago, Illinois. She left behind an impressive legacy of social and political heroism. With her writings, speeches and protests, Wells fought against prejudice, no matter what potential dangers she faced. She once said, “I felt that one had better die fighting against injustice than to die like a dog or a rat in a trap.”