africa-people

By all means, talk and raise awareness about depression. But please mention:

•Not showering or brushing your teeth for two weeks
•Getting sick from a vitamin D deficiency because you haven’t been outside in a solid month
•Getting lightheaded when you stand up from bed because you’ve been laying down for days
•The body pains
•Shampoo not bubbling because this is the first time you washed your hair in three weeks
•Over stimulation
•Pity from a distance
•'Get over yourself, there’s people *in Africa starving, with cancer, homeless, living in poverty, dying, ect.’
•Massive weight gain
•Massive weight loss
•Both
•Your body literally changing how it looks and deposits fat based on frequent weight gain and loss
•Hair loss
•Zero self esteem
•Breaking out in acne so bad you can’t put your head on a pillow from pain
•Being too depressed to commit suicide
•Self imposed isolation
•Stomach cramps
•Nausea
•Vomiting
•'You’re so dramatic, it can’t be that bad’

If you don’t, I’m not saying you’re not raising awareness, but you definitely need to step up your game

7

World Map of literature

The Americas

Canada - Anne of Green Gables
U.S.A - To Kill a MockingBird 
Mexico - Pedro Paramo 
Guatemala - Men of Maize 
Belize - Beka Lamb 
Honduras - Cipotes 
El Salvador - Bitter Grounds 
Nicaragua - The Country Under my Skin 
Costa Rica - La Isla de los hombres solos 
Panama - Plenilunio 
Colombia - 100 Years of Solitude 
Venezuela - Dona Barbara 
Guyana - Palace of the Peacock 
Suriname - The Price of Sugar 
French Guiana - Papillon 
Ecuador - The Villager 
Brazil - Dom Casmurro 
Peru - Death in the Andes 
Bolivia - Bronze Race 
Paraguay - I the Supreme 
Argentina - Ficciones 
Chile - The House of the Spirits 
Uruguay - Soccer in the Sun and Shadow 
Cuba - Havana Bay 
Haiti - Breath, Eyes, Memory 
Dominican Republic - Wonderful Life of Oscar Wao 
Bahamas - The Measure of a Man 
Jamaica - A brief history of Seven Killings 
Puerto Rico - When I was Puerto Rican 
Lesser Antilles - Wide Sargasso Sea 
Greenland - Islands, the Universe, Home


Europe & Russia

Norway - Hunger 
Iceland - Jar City 
Sweden - Gosta Berling’s Saga 
Finland - The Unknown Soldier 
Denmark - Feeling for Snow 
Latvia - Nāvas Ena 
Estonia - Truth and Justice 
Lithuania - Black Sheep 
Belarus - Voices from Chernobyl 
Ukraine - Death and the Penguin 
Moldova - A Siberian Education 
Romania - Forest of the Hanged 
Bulgaria - Under the Yoke 
Poland - Pan Tadeusz 
Germany - Buddenbrooks 
Netherlands - The Discovery of Heaven 
Belgium - The Sorrow of Belgium 
Luxembourg - In Reality: Selected Poems 
United Kingdom - Great Expectations 
Ireland - Ulysses 
Czech Republic - The Good Soldier 
Slovakia - Rivers of Babylon 
France - The Count of Monte Cristo 
Spain - Don Quixote 
Portugal - Baltasar and Blimunda 
Austria - The Man Without Qualities 
Switzerland - Heidi 
Italy - The Divine Comedy 
Slovenia - Alamut 
Croatia - Cafe Europa 
Hungary - Eclipse of the Crescent Moon 
Bosnia and Herzegovina - Zlata’s diary 
Serbia - Dictionary of the Khazars 
Montenegro - Montenegro: A Novel 
Albania - The General of the Dead Army 
Macedonia - Freud’s Sister 
Greece - The Iliad 
Russia - War and Peace


Asia and The Middle East

Turkey - My Name is Red 
Georgia - Knight in the Panther’s Skin 
Armenia - The Fool 
Azerbaijan - Blue Angels
Iran - Shahnameh 
Iraq - The Corpses Exhibition and Other Stories 
Syria - The Dark Side of love 
Lebanon - The Hakawati 
Israel - Mornings in Jenin 
Syria - The Dark Side of Love 
Kuwait - A Map of Home 
UAE - The Sand Fish 
Saudi Arabia - Cities of Salt 
Qatar - The Emergence of Qatar 
Yemen - The Hostage 
Oman - The Turtle of Oman 
Kazakhstan - The Book of Words 
Turkmenistan - The Tale of Aypi 
Uzbekistan - Chasing the Sea 
Kyrgyzstan - Jamilia 
Tajikistan - Hurramabad 
Afghanistan - Kite Runner 
Pakistan - The Reluctant Fundamentalist 
Nepal - The Palpasa Cafe 
India - The God of Small Things 
Bhutan - the Circle of Karma 
Bangladesh - A Golden Age 
Myanmar - Smile as they Bow 
Laos - In the Other Side of the Eye 
Thailand - The Four Reigns 
Vietnam - The Sorrows of War 
Cambodia - First they Killed my Family 
Taiwan - Green Island 
Sri Lanka - Anil’s Ghost 
Mongolia - The Blue Sky 
North Korea - The Aquariums of Pyongyang 
South Korea - The Vegetarian 
Japan - Kokoro 
China - The Dream of the Red Chamber 
Malaysia - The Garden of Evening Mists 
Brunei - Some Girls 
Indonesia - This Earth of Mankind 
Philippines - Noli Me Tangere 
East Timor - The Redundancy of Courage


Australiz, New Zealand & The Pacific Islands

Australia - Cloudstreet 
Papua New Guinea - Death of a Muruk 
Vanuatu - Black Stone 
Solomon Islands - Suremada 
Fiji - Tales of the Tikongs 
New Zealand - The bone People


Africas

Algeria - The Stranger
Libya - In the Country of Men
Egypt - Palace Walk
Morocco - The Sand Child
Mauritania - Silent Terror: A Journey into Contemporary African Slavery
Mali - Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali
Niger - Sarraounia
Chad - The Roots of Heaven
Sudan - Lyrics Alley
Nigeria - Things Fall Apart
Cameroon - The Old Man and the Medal
Central African Republic - Batouala
South Sudan - They Poured Fire on Us from the Sky
Ethiopia - Beneath the Lion’s Gaze
Somalia - The Orchard of Lost Souls
Democratic Republic of the Congo - The Antipeople
Uganda - Abyssinian Chronicles
Kenya - Petals of Blood
Tanzania - Desertion
Angola - A Gloriosa Familia
Zambia - Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier
Mozambique - Sleepwalking Land
Zimbabwe - The House of Hunger
Namibia - Born of the Sun
Botswana - The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency
South Africa - Disgrace

Abdelkrim Hassane, 41, worked as an analyst-programmer for the Quebec government. “He  had two young children who waited in vain for their father to return home,”

Azzeddine Soufiane, 57, was originally from Morocco and emigrated to Quebec City to attend  Laval University. He was known as a backbone for newly arrived Muslims. “He was almost like the president of the community. He helped and guided all the people who arrived here – students, families,” said a member of his Moroccan community group.

Khaled Belkacemi, 60, was from Algeria. He received a master’s in chemical engineer from Université de Sherbrooke and was a professor at Laval University.

Boubaker Thabti, 44, was a pharmacy worker from Tunisia who lived only 5 minutes away from the mosque. He had two children, ages 3 and 10.

Mamadou Tanou Barry, 42, and Ibrahima Barry, 39, were friends and civil-servants from Guinea that lived in the same apartment building, but were not related despite sharing the same last name. Ibrahima Barry worked for the health insurance board and had four young children, and Mamadou was an IT worker who left behind two sons.

I want every news org to put this fact front and center when writing about the shooting.

2

When I was 8 years old, I saw the Olympics for the first time, and I said I wanted to be the fastest man in the world. My mother said, “You’ll never be the fastest man in the world because there’s people in Kenya, there’s people in Jamaica, there’s people in Africa running because they want to eat. Until you want something like you want to eat, you’ll never be incredibly proficient at it.” That’s something that’s stuck with me. Everything I want, I do it like it’s the last thing

#Melanin #WarOnMelanin 

The Aeta (Ayta, pronounced eye-tə), or Agta, are an indigenous people who live in scattered, isolated mountainous parts of the island of Luzon, the Philippines.

These peoples are considered to be Negritos, whose skin ranges from dark to very dark brown, and possessing features such as a small stature and frame; hair of a curly to kinky texture and a higher frequency of naturally lighter colour (blondism) relative to the general population; small nose; and dark brown eyes. They are thought to be among the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines, preceding the Austronesian migrations. The earliest inhabitants of the Philippines lived some 40,000 years ago.

The Aeta were included in the group of people termed “Negrito” during Spanish Era. Various Aeta groups in northern Luzon are known as Pugut or Pugot, an Ilocano term that also means “goblin” or “forest spirit”, and is the colloquial term for people with darker complexions. These names are mostly considered inappropriate or derogatory by fellow Negritos of northern Luzon.

… 

The Aeta are the indigenous people of the Philippines. The pale skin Eurasians you see there today are Mongoloid – not Negrito. The Mongoloids are invaders to the islands. Those they could not kill they have tried to breed out. The Aeta have been dealing with genocide longer than the Australian aborigine, and long before any Europeans set foot on the island. Most people suffer some sort of cognitive dissonance around this issue. It is inconceivable that Asians are killing black people and Asians have been killing black people and stealing their land for ‘thousands’ of years. There is no stigma like that of the European slave trade. The Arabs and the Mongols have essentially gotten away with the mass murder of hundreds of millions of black lives. Most see the people of India as a race and not genocide. To be clear – Indian is a nationality not a race. People are not aware of truly how much suffering black people on this earth have had to endure. 800 years before the transatlantic slave trade there was the Arab slave trade. The Arab slave trade was still going on when the European slave trade began and has never quite ended. It is said that the Arab slave trade was equal to the European slave trade if not worse. Before the Arab slave trade the Mongols killed upwards of 40 million people (some estimates are as high as 80 million). At this early time in human history that is almost half of what would have been the worlds known population. The Mongol Empire eventually stretched from Central Europe to the Sea of Japan. The black people in China and Japan were genocided out of history (some say they still remain in pockets). The black people of Thailand(the Mani), Cambodia (the Khmer) and Vietnam (the Champa) are all still there despite the genocide. In India the black people there have been under attack for 3500 years. Today black people in India are extremely confused about their identity. Most people alive today still dont know how it is that black people came to have straight hair even though the science is there. This may come as a surprise but black people were even the first Hawaiians and Hebrews. Racism did not start in Europe. Racism started in the East and spread towards Europe, which explains why they were the last ones to take part in the enslavement of indigenous black people. What the Mongols couldn’t finish the Arabs took up and what the Arabs couldn’t finish the Europeans took up. WE HAVE HAD NO FRIENDS YET NO RACE COULD HAVE ENDURED WHAT THE BLACK RACE HAS ENDURED AND STILL BE ALIVE TO TELL ABOUT IT. WE ARE THE TRUE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE OF ALL TROPICAL LAND ON THIS EARTH AND WE ARE STILL HERE…

[Message for the racists that commented on this post]

I know exactly what I’m talking about.

#BlackLivesMatter
#StopBlackGenocide  



None of our scholars used the word “colorism” because none of them saw the need to. It has only been popular for a couple years now and already I have seen this word used to cover up anti-black racism a thousand times over. Even when a situation is clearly anti-black racism rearing its ugly head people will say “colorism exists everywhere”… Even when all points are indicating that it’s black genocide and erasure, people are saying “colorism exists everywhere”…
All you hair revolutionaries and social services revolutionaries need to take a seat, and/or read a book.      



“Shadeism” was a popular term long before colorism, and still is. Do your research. Pigmentocracry is also another term you should all get familiar with.
Those terms do not apply to this image, and neither does colorism.



Just in case you missed it: Those terms do not apply to this image, and neither does colorism.    



It’s messed up that only one non-black person accurately saw this image for what it is. She wrote “98% sure that last girl is actually African and her white counterpart is….welll. not filipino”. The way the word colorism is being used is not serving our best interests. It should find its place among ethnic white people – where it belongs.

… 

Black people fought to no longer be called “coloured”. As soon as we rid ourselves of that term – here comes “colorism”… I found that very coincidental, and suspect.  



The word “colorism” may have some place (most likely among ethnic white groups) but as it stands it only serves to confuse the narrative. How many times did you hear Master Teacher MLK or Malcolm X use the word “colorism”? How many times did Master Teacher Dr. John Henrik Clarke or Dr. Yosef Ben-Jochannan use the word? Were you ever once confused by the words our black scholars used? What about the rest of our African historians? Did they too lack the intelligence? Do you think they lacked the proper vocabulary to express themselves? Could you dare think such a thing?

… 

The struggle for black people is real. The Black Holocaust is real. Black Genocide is real. Anti-Black Racism is real. Black Erasure is real. Fix your lips and call this what it is. “Colorism” is a nice soft word like “colonialism” that white people use to make themselves feel better about what is happening and what has happened. They are two very watered-down definitions that mask the brutality and continual injustice and unjust circumstance black people are now dealing with.  

… 

Can white people say STOP BLACK GENOCIDE AND ERASURE?

Can white people say STOP STEALING BLACK PEOPLES RESOURCES AND LANDS?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE WORLDWIDE DESERVE REPARATIONS?

Can white people say BLACK LOVE MATTERS?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE DESERVE LAND IN AMERICA?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE DESERVE SAFE SPACES?

Can white people say WHITE PEOPLE ARE THE REASON HOLLYWOOD
AND BOLLYWOOD IS ANTI-BLACK RACIST?

Can white people say NON-BLACK PEOPLE OF COLOR ALSO PERPETUATE ANTI-BLACK RACISM AND BLACK GENOCIDE?

Can white people say FOR 3000 YEARS BLACK PEOPLE IN INDIA HAVE BEEN ENSLAVED BY ANTI-BLACK RACISM?

Can white people say CLEARLY THERE IS A GENOCIDE TAKING PLACE IN INDIA AND MELANESIA?

Can white people say WHY HAS EVERYONE ELSE GOTTEN REPARATIONS BUT BLACK PEOPLE?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE DESERVE BLACK SPACES?

Can white people say BLACK PEOPLE IN AFRICA, THE WEST, INDIA, THAILAND AND MELANESIA HAVE BEEN CUT OFF FROM ONE ANOTHER BY EURASIANS?

Can white people say EVERY TIME THEY TURN ON THE TV THEY SEE THE ANTI-BLACK RACISM TOO?

Can white people say WHITE PEOPLE ARE CAUSING AND HAVE CAUSED BLACK CHILDREN TO SUFFER FROM SELF-HATE? 

And Black Panther is an AMERICAN comic!!! The movie had an African American director and stars African American, American folks one gen removed from Africa, and Afro-British people who are also one generation removed from Africa. SO TBH????? Issa cute lil mix of people! Holy Unnecessary Diaspora Conflict Batman!

This is Douglas, a happy hippo cared for by Steve and Anna Tolan in their wildlife rehabilitation center. Douglas loves to give kisses to those willing and he is good friends with a ferocious crocodile that lives in the same lagoon as he.

why don’t people understand that minority =/= oppressed

blondes are a minority. blondes are not oppressed

vegans are a minority. vegans are not oppressed

bald people are a minority. bald people are not oppressed

just because you are a minority of something doesn’t mean you’re oppressed. oppression requires systemic and institutional movements meant to disenfranchise and disadvantage groups of people.

You don’t even need to be a minority to be oppressed. The majority of South Africans are black but they are still subject to racism. White people make up less than 10% of the population of South Africa, but white people are not oppressed in South Africa on the basis of being a “racial minority” there

Please dear god educate yourself on oppression dynamics before speaking up like you’re an authority on it