affirmative actions

The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassions, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen.
—  Elizabeth Kubler-Ross

hey fellow asians, let’s stop using cultural relativism and post colonial theory to justify antiblackness.

what you’re basically doing is using identity politics to weasel your way out of accountability.

our countries participated in the slave trade. that cannot be justified by cultural relativism. 

white supremacy/colonialism spread its ideology to asian countries. that cannot be justified by post-colonialism. antiblackness exists in our countries, ourselves, our histories. own up to it. 

whether it’s thinking that we can use the n word or other antiblack slurs because some of us have been targeted by misdirected antiblackness, or thinking that we have a claim to black culture because of racialization, or thinking racial relativism theory is an excuse for antiblackness (modern slavery, police brutality, etc)……. we need to stop. lmao. like. we blame black people for their hypervisibility without realizing that it’s white people who made us invisible. we blame affirmative action for the reason we get rejected by employers and universities when in fact we’re rejected because of racism and AA largely benefits white women. we think it’s okay to use the n word or that it’s fine for our people to profit from modern slavery because “uwu slavery is a western phenomenon” or “uwu we don’t have american racial dynamics”. that’s fucking bullshit and you know it’s fucking bullshit. slavery is not exclusive to the west. antiblackness is the foundation of white supremacy; thus it’s no wonder that all asians are antiblack. you can’t fucking simultaneously use post-colonialism/cultural relativism to excuse antiblackness and then at the same time use american racial politics to blame black people for hypervisibility. you’re being a disingenuous asshole when you do that. 

we alienate black asians when we do these things too. 

excusing police brutality just because the cop is asian is disgusting. justifying slavery just because the slaveowners are asian is disgusting. defending assault just because the assaulter is an asian immigrant is disgusting. ignorning the use of slurs and the theft of black culture just because the thief is asian is disgusting. 

don’t ask for support, solidarity, or respect from black people if you don’t want to put in the work or eradicate antiblackness. frankly all of us need to work on this. we are all socialized to be antiblack. you are. i am. our parents are. our friends our. our communities within asia and across the diaspora are. we ALL need to work on it. 

(don’t touch this post if you aren’t black and/or asian). 

Things to remember this pride month:

- lgbtiaq+ kids are valid; you are never too young to find a label you are comfortable with
- ace/aro individuals aren’t straight
- bi/ pan individuals aren’t “half” or “part” straight
- bi erasure is a thing
- aro erasure is a thing
- trans women exclusion from feminism is still a thing
- representation in the media is important
- affirmative action matters

“Failure should be our teacher, not our undertaker. Failure is delay, not defeat. It is a temporary detour, not a dead end. Failure is something we can avoid only by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing.” - Denis Waitley

what i just don’t understand (and by that i mean “what i understand perfectly”) is why white men always complain when a woman and/or person of color is hired into a position they, too, were seeking. too often, it’s “ugh, affirmative action,” “ugh, reverse racism/sexism,” “ugh, they took my job.”
y'all… why did you assume it was “your job” to begin with? does it not cross your mind that maybe just maybe that other person was more qualified/better equipped/et cetera? or do you just assume that, because you’re white and a man, you’re automatically the best candidate? hmmmmmm…

Common Micro-aggressions: African Americans and/or
Black People

Anonymous said: What are some common micro-aggressions that a black american will regularly have to deal with?

Behold this masterpost of common micro-aggressions towards African Americans and/or people in the African Diaspora, several of which may be applicable to other PoC. Micro-aggressions can be perpetuated by White people as well as fellow Black people and People of Color.

This is just to give a thorough understanding of some of the things a Black person (often in America) deals with. Don’t run forward and jam-pack your Black character with every one of these experiences, though I can say I’ve personally experienced every one of these or know someone who has.

General Micro-aggressions

  • People excusing blackface.
  • Having our grammar and annunciation corrected.
  • “I don’t see you as a Black person/ I don’t see colour.”
  • Calling Black people ghetto, thugs, rachet, sassy, urban…
  • People debating why they should be allowed to say the n-word.
  • Then saying the n-word anyway.
  • Whispering, spitting, or stumbling over the word "Black” as if it’s a curse.
  • Refusing to pronounce your name right, or just calling you by a different name that’s easier.
  • Alternatively, “jokingly” calling you a “ghetto” name.
  • Constantly mixing up unrelated and not even resembling Black people, because you know.. ‘Black people all look the same’.
  • Dismissing our experiences as “just overreacting,” defending the wronging party, or using our plight to talk about one’s own experience (e.g. “well as a gay man i’ve got it rough…”).
  • Telling racist jokes and calling you sensitive when you don’t find it funny.
  • “______  is the new civil rights movement!” Black folks are still fighting for their rights so…

Media

  • Fox news (xD)
  • Caricatured depictions of Black people on TV.
  • Casting calls for Black people only tailored for “race roles.”
  • Media treating white criminals and killers better than Black victims (see these headlines).

Stereotypes

  • Assuming you only listen to rap/hip-hop/r&b.
  • Assuming you love chicken, Kool-aid, and/or smoke weed.
  • Assuming you’re good at sports.
  • Assuming there’s no father in the picture in Black families.
  • Assuming all Black people (see: young girls) have children.
  • Calling Black people who don’t conform to one’s image of Blackness, “less black,” acting white or “oreo.”

AAVE

  • Non-Black People mimicking/imitating AAVE.
  • People falling into AAVE when talking to Black People.
  • “Why don’t Black people speak real English instead of ‘ebonics’?”

Insults/doubting intelligence:

  • You’re so articulate!”
  • You take advanced classes?!”
  • “How did she get into that [prestigious school and/or program]?”
  • “They only got x because they’re Black/Affirmative action.”
  • Assuming a Black person (usually male) attends college because of a sports scholarship.
  • Counselors discouraging Black students to take prestigious coursework, assuming it’s too difficult for them.

 Respectability politics:

  • “You’re a credit to your race.”
  • “I’m glad you’re not like those other Black people. You’re not ghetto or listen to that rap stuff..”
  • Tone policing: dismissing someone’s reaction/argument/etc. because they are too “emotional.” Thinking that we need to be calm in order to be taken seriously. 
  • Pitting African immigrants against African Americans, especially those coming to America for education, aka “Good Blacks.”

Beauty Standards and Dating

Fetishization/Othering

  • People asking you what you are or where you’re really from.
  • Referring to Black people or our features as “exotic.”
  • Referring to Black people’s skin as chocolate or other foods.

Black Women/Misogynoir

  • Saying Black women are ”strong, independent and don’t need no man.“
  • Calling Black women ”sassy“ or angry if she shows passion/emotion.
  • Referring to white and non-black women as "girls” and “women” while calling Black women “Females.”
  • [White] males who apply courtesy to white women (holding doors, giving up seat) but don’t apply the same to Black women.
  • Referring to Black women on government assistance as “welfare queens” (While ignoring that white people get more government assistance than Black people in the USA).
  • “Black women All woman are beautiful.” (Stop. That. Please.)

Hair.

  • People touching/petting your hair without consent.
  • “So is that your real hair? Are those extensions?”
  • Calling natural black hair unprofessional.
  • White people appropriating Black hair styles (dreads, twists, etc) and being praised as edgy, while it’s “ghetto, unprofessional, and unclean” on our own heads.

Poverty Assumptions:

  • “Do you live in the ghetto?”
  • “Can you afford that?”
  • “Here are the value prices of this product…”

Racial Profiling + Criminalization:

  • Crossing the street to avoid passing Black men/people.
  • Following in stores, assuming Black people are stealing.
  • Moving aside when we pass, clutching purse, locking doors.
  • Asking Black people for I.D. when paying with card (while white people are not asked).
  • Being pulled over + arrested at astonishingly higher rates than white people.

For a fuller understanding of micro aggressions and the effects it has on individuals overtime, please see this: “These incidents may appear small…”

~Mods: Colette and Alice

I’ve seen a lot of the “Lance’s family immigrated to America” thing in fanfics, but the beach he mentions is in Cuba, so I’ve been thinking…

Please consider: a Lance who isn’t an American citizen. Who grew up watching Florida’s space shuttle launches through a scope his father dragged down to the beach at Varadero. Who literally spent years trying to train away his Cuban accent so he’d have a better chance of being accepted into the world’s most advanced space program. Who has to balance worries about his student visa not being renewed with the challenges of his tough piloting courses. Whose feelings of inferiority to Keith are being badly exacerbated by snide whispers from classmates about how he must have only gotten in on affirmative action. Whose disappearance causes an international incident between America and Cuba.

(And maybe also: A Lance who’s able to automatically accept Galra!Keith not just because “Ooh fuzzy <3” but because he knows exactly what xenophobia and racism feel like–knows exactly what it’s like to be treated like an alien in the one place he most wanted to belong, and he refuses to ever make someone else feel the way he did.)

Just sayin’.

Getting into the Ivy League: Some Unpopular Opinions

Background: I am an “unhooked” (i.e., upper-middle class Asian-American) Princeton SCEA admit, and these are some of my thoughts on the college admissions process.

Disclaimer: Everything I write below is solely a high schooler’s opinion—I’m by no means in the know, so take everything with a grain of salt.

Overrated elements of a college application:

  • Leadership-Leadership is seen by many as a mark of success in extracurriculars. While it can be immensely valuable, having extensive leadership positions is not necessary: I’m President of exactly one club and one of many officers at my HS literary magazine—and not even Editor-in-Chief at that. 
  • Well-roundedness-My extracurriculars are extremely narrow in scope. They can be divided into exactly two categories: Classics-related activities and writing-related activities. In my opinion, depth of accomplishment (pointiness) is more important than breadth (well-roundedness); above all, passion is more important than objective stats and awards.
  • Teacher recommendations-If you’re an introvert like me, don’t fret. I didn’t click with any of my teachers, and I honestly don’t think it hurt me. That said, there are some ways to get to know them even if you don’t participate/contribute actively in class. Approach them after class; show that you care. For example, I asked my English teacher to provide feedback on my submissions to various writing contests. Also, make sure to supply your recommenders with a “brag sheet” outlining not just your accomplishments but also your goals for the future.
  • Affirmative Action-Being an under-represented minority or first-generation student isn’t as much of a boost as you think it is. Conversely, being Asian or Caucasian isn’t a drawback unless you make it a drawback. I’m privileged to pretty much be the antithesis of a typical “hooked” applicant, and yet I got into some pretty decent schools. Just don’t be a test-taking robot. Set yourself apart. And I don’t mean cultivating uncommon extracurriculars: if you’ve played piano or violin your entire life, that’s great. Show your passion and—this is the important part—try to connect it to something bigger than yourself. Why does it matter in the greater scheme of things? Again, nothing deep. Be genuine, humanize yourself, and you’re good to go.


Underrated elements of a college application:

  • Packaging-Packaging yourself well is paramount. By packaging, I don’t mean planning out your extracurriculars in middle school and doing things that look good on a resume. I’m talking about communicating a cohesive narrative through your application—what do you care about? how will you make an impact to the college community and the world at large? Essays are really helpful vehicles to convey your passions and best qualities.
  • Scores-For most unhooked applicants, there’s a baseline—2100+ and 3.8 GPA—under which it’s very hard to get into a school with a sub-10% acceptance rate. That said, scores only prevent your app from being tossed out; they won’t get you through the door.
One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don’t throw it away.
—  Stephen Hawking

Head Canon: Every time someone (usually a man) says something snotty/degrading to the women in Tony’s life, he gasps and covers his mouth and looks at the guy with wide eyes.

Man: Women shouldn’t be allowed to be field agents because they’re weaker than men. It’s a biological thing I’m not being sexist!
Tony: *gasps, covers mouth in horror*
Maria Hill: *smiles* I’m strong enough to carry your body into the woods.

Man: I just can’t believe we have a woman for our CEO, you know? As a tech company and everything? Tech is a man’s world, after all–
Tony: *gasps, covers mouth in horror*
Pepper: Didn’t you just ask me how to connect to the whiffee on your tablet? It’s pronounced why-fy by the way. And I can take apart and put back together the three latest Stark Pads and the five latest Stark Phones.

Man: I dunno, I just don’t see why Black Widow is on the team. It’s not like she has anything to add to the team!
Tony: *gasps, covers mouth in horror*
Natasha: I will snap your neck with my pinky finger alone.

Man: Women don’t belong in STEM!
Tony: *gasps, covers mouth in horror*
Jane: *snaps pencil, swivels around like a horror movie creature* What did you say!? Tony, are you watching?! I’m about to get a PhD in kicking someone’s ass!

Man: Women have no business– *screams*
Tony: *covers mouth in shock, watches guy fall to the floor spasming*
Darcy: Literally nothing he could have said would have been good. Thanks for the new taser by the way I love it.

Man: It should go back to the way it was, where women stayed at home and kept house! I’m tired of losing jobs to women for some affirmative action bullshit!
Tony: *gasps, covers mouth in horror*
Sharon: :) It :) would :) be :) a :) shame :) if :) you :) died :)

Steve: *accidentally says something sexist*
Tony: *flailing* HE’S FROM THE FORTIES AND DOESN’T KNOW THAT’S OFFENSIVE!
Literally Every Woman in the Room: *skeptical side-eye*
Steve: D: I apologize! I didn’t realize–I’m trying to learn! I know sometimes I don’t get it right but I am trying. :C
Literally Every Woman in the Room: *takes hand off sidearm*
(Steve is, of course, trying, and he would never be outright sexist but times (and women as a whole!) have changed a lot.)

Man-ssassin: Aw, a little old lady! This job is going to be the easiest I’ve ever had! >:3
Peggy: I won’t hesitate, you bastard. *pulls gun*
Tony: *hears gunshot, gasps in horror* Oh my God. Rest in fucking pieces then I guess.

Like I’m sure Tony could eviscerate any sexist he came across but he doesn’t need to because all of the women in his life are perfectly capable of doing it themselves (and better, sometimes!).