afaried

anonymous asked:

afari! your hair looks so dang good!

Thank you!! I should probably take a break from dying it soon like ive been putting so many chemicals on it but.. Yolo

Syria gov't says UN round of talks was "useful and productive"

GENEVA, April 26 (Reuters) - The Syrian government said on Tuesday that it had held final session of talks with the United Nations mediator in a “useful and productive round”.
Bashar Ja'afari, head of the Syrian government delegation, was speaking to reporters after meeting U.N. Special Envoy Staffan de Mistura on the day before the two-week round is due to end in Geneva.
“I can describe this particular round as useful and productive,” Ja'afari said, declining to take questions.
(Reporting by Stephanie Nebehay; editing by Shadia Nasralla)

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Safari Park at Safari World (Bangkok of Thailand)

Stretching 8 km. and lasting 45 minutes, a drive through the scenic Safari Park presents a unique opportunity for the closest encounter possible with rare and endangered species of the animal kingdom. Explore Nature’s humorous wonders in their original splendor and respond to the call of the wild, while remaining in the comfort of your car or coach. Witness the truly breathtaking Tiger Feeding Show, the only one of its kind anywhere in the world. An exciting and fulfilling adventure awaits at Safari Park.    

Open : Mon - Sun 9.00 am. - 5.00 pm.

Thanks for information by Safari World   

Iran Imprisons 4 Journalists for Spying and Propaganda

April 27, 2016

Iran Imprisons Four Journalists on Propaganda and Espionage Charges

Sputnik International

April 27, 2016

The verdict signals a pushback by the ruling regime after the country’s moderates racked up massive gains against Islamist parties in the February general elections.

On Tuesday, Iran issued prison sentences to four journalists on security-related charges, according to the privately-owned Tasnim news agency. The verdict suggests that the country’s hardliners maintain control over the judiciary, despite reform advances in the February elections.

The four journalists were found guilty of charges including “spreading propaganda against the Islamic Republic,” and “acting against national security and contacting foreign governments.” The imprisoned journalists appeared to favor the political opposition with reporting that was often critical of the country’s theocracy.

The attorney for three of the convicted journalists, Mohammed Alizadeh-Tabatabai, stated that “Davoud Assadi was sentenced to 10 years, Afari Chhitsaz and Ehsan Safarzayi were each sentenced to five years, and Ehsan Mazandarani was sentenced to seven years in prison.”

Mazandarani served as the editor-in-chief of the reformist newspaper Farhikhtegan at the time of his arrest in 2013. Chitaz and Safarzaie were arrested in a November 2015 dragnet by Iran’s Revolutionary Guards loyal to the Ayatollah. Assadi was also arrested in November 2015, although circumstances surrounding his apprehension are unknown.

The charges come as moderate President Hassan Rouhani grows in popularity after taking steps toward cooperation with the United States by curbing Iran’s nuclear program. The decision led to moderates securing substantial gains over Islamist parties during the country’s general election in February. Western analysts speculate that the results indicate that Islamic hardliners may be losing control over the country.

Notwithstanding the election results, the country’s leader Ayatollah Khamenei maintains in control of the judiciary, with some interpreting the decision to crackdown on dissenting opinions an ominous warning to Iran’s growing moderate majority. In recent weeks the country has begun arresting dozens of journalists, dual-citizens and activists, warning of an imminent “Western infiltration.”

Western human rights organizations have widely condemned the new verdicts. The Committee to Protect Journalists called on Iran to immediately release all detained journalists including those convicted today.

The United Nations followed suit, releasing a statement criticizing Tehran for “curtailing the rights to freedom of expression, association and assembly, arresting and imprisoning journalists, human rights defenders, trade unionists and others who voiced dissent, on vague and overly broad charges.”

Iranian officials counter that the arrests are necessary to prevent the growing threat of Western intervention, accusing the West of human rights violations throughout the region.