aes sidhe

anonymous asked:

Hello! I was wondering if it's a good idea to start working with the aes sidhe? Thanks! ~ A Sneaky Shark Friend

Hello Sneaky Shark Friend!

So, it kinda depends on a variety of things.

I’ve known people who worked with the aes sidhe in so much as to get the aes sidhe off their back haha. So they’d leave offerings and take care of a shrine all so that the aes sidhe would leave them alooone.

Then there’s people who actively seek out the aes sidhe for their own reasons. Being a spirit worker, being a hedge witch, etc. It seems to me that it felt natural to seek out the fae in that context.

Some things to keep in mind is that the aes sidhe can include the Tuatha Dé Danann, so if you honor any of those deities you are kinda already honoring the aes sidhe. Another thing to note is that the aes sidhe aren’t “nature spirits” in the sense of animism, but kinda their own thing? So you can work with nature spirits (the spirit of a river, for example) without involving yourself with the aes sidhe.

If you want to work with the aes sidhe, you should probably ask yourself: Why? What do you hope to accomplish? Which isn’t to say you shouldn’t work with the aes sidhe, but knowing what you want out of a relationship is important for any type of relationship – but especially one with a fae. They’re known tricksters, after all, with a love of word play and wit. 

I personally don’t interact with the aes sidhe. They haven’t sought me out, and I don’t seek them out. I don’t think I could personally handle their mischief.  

Some books to look into getting if you want to work with the aes sidhe:

TL;DR: Working or not working with the aes sidhe will depend on what you want out of the relationship. I don’t personally work with the aes sidhe, but others do. Be wary of their mischief, though. 

Faeries - writing research help

Hey guys! Grim here. 

This post will be on the Aes Sidhe (sidhe is pronounced like shee), fairies or fae. Every writer writes the fae their own way, but some research and background information never hurt anyone. Remember that research is your bread and butter, folks.  

Again, i would like to apologies for typos that will undoubtedly slip past me - the post is likely to be filled with red lines because of the faerie names and Irish words and my keyboard is obstinate on the best of days. (Seriously, if MS word can recognize some of the idiosyncrasies of the Hiberno-dialect, why can’t chrome? It has declared war on the letter s and made me doubt my spelling.)

(Also I am not going to rant about how a certain suethor made blood drinking creatures who more resemble the fae folk than actual vampires, but i will say for you to do your research and change the name of your supernatural creature if they match another creature more than the one you have named them after.)

oOo

What is a faerie?

Fairy, or faerie, is the term for a group of supernatural creatures who are said to be “neither in God’s nor the devil’s service” - that is, neither good nor evil. They are completely outside of religion - it does not interest them, and in certain cases the fae will leave someone alone if they ask for blessings from whatever deity or deities they worship.

Some say that faeries are the children of angels and demons, or that they are fallen angels who were indecisive during the fall and as such, were shown mercy. Before Christianity came to Ireland it was said that the fae were the Tuatha Dé Danann who had been driven underground by the Milesians - those who the Irish are now descended from. Still yet others claim that faeries escort the souls of the dead to heaven, while themselves being barred from it, or that they are themselves dead souls undergoing penance for past actions before they may be admitted to heaven.

Whatever the truth, the fae now live underground in a land where time does not pass as it does on the surface - three short days underground could equal three centuries above, a few hours could be a century. (It does seem to fluctuate a bit) 

The faerie court

Each faerie household contains a king, a queen and a fool. King Fionvarra rules over all western faeries alongside his queen, Oonagh (I suspect this may be an Anglicization as Úna is far more common/correct in Irish, much like how the second “n” got added to Conor when it started being used outside of Ireland. Yes google, I am sure that Conor is the correct spelling, you’re the one in the wrong here so stop bloody highlighting it!!!! My apologies for that rant, I am bad with computers. Now let us return to our scheduled posting.)

The fool, or amadan (fool, male only, there’s a separate word for female fool, Oisean. An “i” gets added before the “n” in both cases to make a plural. the spelling amadawn is another Anglicization.) stays within the faerie borders except for June. for that month, he wanders about in mortal lands wild and half naked, dashing mortal wits out. Yes, you read that correctly, he essentially goes about hitting people with whatever is on hand and in the process reduces their IQ by a considerable amount. Worse still, there is no cure. 

Changelings

It is a mostly forgotten fact that only male children are stolen from the cradle. Females are stolen closer to adulthood, essentially being chosen to become a faerie chief’s lover for seven years, at which point they will be returned as a withered hag. Sometimes the fae will take an adult of either gender, usually to perform some task for them or to marry a chief or queen. In the former case, if they complete the task, the fae will allow them to return, rich and successful beyond their dreams. A human taken to nurse a sick faerie might return as a world renowned doctor, for example. 

In any case, the fae leave behind a substitute encased in a glamour charm. this could be anything from a log to a dying faerie child to a human who was stolen and has now grown old (the fae like humans to die among their own when the time comes), who will soon grow ill and die.

A number of brutal “cures” were used to force the fae to return the original child, including using foxglove to “burn the entrails out of the faerie”. Of course, in all cases, this was just an innocent child being tortured to death - do not try this at home, or any other such “cure”. if you really feel the need to test someone for faerieness, WAIT UNTIL THEY CAN EAT PROPERLY and give them some jam and bread. When they eat it you will know that your fears are completely unfounded. The fae cannot stomach human food of any description. There is no reason to hurt an innocent child.

I do not think anyone would actually do such a thing, but one must cover their own back, yes? 

It was also believed possible for one to enter the faerie fort and take back the child, provided they had not drank three times of the er, enchanted milk. Yes, i just balked at putting the word starting with b in there, purely because of the whole enchanted milk thing. Yeesh. Excuse me… I need the brain bleach.

Much better. Where was I? Ah, yes.

In the case of a stolen wife her husband could attack the faeries when they are abroad and rescue her that way, or by taking the impostor’s girdle, burning it and burying the pin from it.

The Leprechaun and the Cluricaun

Leprechauns make shoes. They are not caricatures of the Irish. please stop using them as such. They wear grey coats, a leather apron, and a red hat for a bit of colour. They are foul-mouthed and generally disagreeable. They guard faerie treasure, and each leprechaun’s entrusted horde is marked by a rainbow. if found and caught, a leprechaun will tell a mortal where the treasure is, but as soon as they get a chance they will thwart the would be thief. In one case a man marked the tree one such rove was buried under with a red cloth. He made the leprechaun swear not to touch the cloth or the treasure while he left to get a shovel, and when he returned every tree in the forest had a red cloth tied ‘round it.

Clurichauns are either close cousins of the leprechauns or simply extremely drunken leprechauns on a spree. either way, the leprechauns deny any association to the cluricauns. cluricauns look exactly like leprechauns save a reddish nose - potentially the result of too much alcohol - and clothing.

The Fear Dearg

A near relation to the leprechaun who enjoys mischief making. Nothing amuses him more than mortal terror. One should say “Ná déan magadh fúm” or “Do not mock me” when encountering a fear dearg to prevent oneself becoming part of some cruel trick or game. strangely enough, the fear dearg show not malice, but favour through their tricks - if thy trick you, you have something they want to see. They might terrorize a modest musician into giving them a performance, for example. 

They will attach themselves to certain houses and will expect a certain treatment, such as food and drink being left out when the household goes to bed.

The fear dearg is good natured and will bring good luck to his targets. (How is natured not a word asdfghjkl!)

Merrows and Silkies

Male merrows will sit by the sea in any weather, scanning for brandy that has been lost with a wrecked ship. Female merrows find them repulsive and instead seek to tease mortal men. Both genders wear a cap and have webbed fingers.

If a fisherman manages to take a female merrow’s cap, she will forget her life in the sea. The fishermen inevitable fail to destroy or adequately hide the cap, and once found, the female merrow will try it on and remember her life in the sea.

Silkies are seals by day and humans by night. They will obey anyone who holds their seal skin, which they shed every evening and leave on the sand. If they marry a human who then becomes lost at sea, they will sing from the cliffs to guide their spouse home.

Banshees

Banshees are not the causes of death, merely a harbinger. Banshees will attach themselves to an old family (descended from the Milesians) ans will wail upon the death of a family member. They are exclusively female and can be found washing the shirts of those not long for this world. Banshees love their families and will exult at their great deeds and good fortunes, following them to distant lands and attending their funerals unseen.

The Dullahan

Sometimes seen in the company of the banshee, the dullahan appears where a mortal dies. He drives a black carriage with six headless horses and gathers the souls of the dead. He strikes any living being to see him blind.

The Lianhan Shee

The Lianhan Shee, or love faerie, seeks the love and dominion over mortal men. There is only one Lianhan Shee, and she is more a force than anything, for all faeries who love are said to become one with her and to the mortal man who longs for her she is the only one. No one has ever described the Lianhan Shee. She insists upon her lovers entering Tír na nÓg (land of the young).

oOo

There are many other types of faerie, but this post is getting long, so i’m going to stop here.

I hope this post helps with writing inspiration/research!

Hello my fellow tumblr people!
I am a firm believer in the aes sidhe (also known as the fair folk, the fey, the good people, ext.) and other mystic things of that sort.
If you are also a believer leave me a message and we can talk about this subject(because quite frankly there’s no one I can talk to about these sort of things.)