aeration soil

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Q: Who aerates soil in the wild?
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A: Worms and other burrowing insects. Since we don’t welcome them in our homes, our house plants expect us to do their job. Read more on soil aeration in my blog post (link in profile)

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I don’t have any soil to repot my giant aloe and I want to wait till we get to the farm anyway but I did switch out the top ¼ of his soil for some nice new stuff.

I was reading up on his spots and the Internet says it’s either from over watering or a fungal infection. I’m going to cut back on watering and see if that helps. I also aerated the soil a bit because it was really compacted.

on-my-throne-of-books  asked:

Hey! I was wondering if you could help me out? My aloe's been getting dents in some of its leaves, and a brown spot just showed up in the biggest dent. I rarely water it so I know it's not overwatered, and I moved it closer to the window since it was a little far away. Any idea what could've caused this, or how to fix it?

Hello! Since you ruled out overwatering, it could be that:

A) the soil itself is holding too much moisture. repot to a grittier mix containing at least 50% coarse sand, perlite, or pumice;

B) the soil is compacted around the roots. use a chopstick or pencil to gently loosen up and aerate the soil;

C) there’s been physical damage to the plant (it was bumped into, it’s been poked at, was roughed up when being potted, etc.). there’s no way to fix these marks, but they will scar over.

Hope this is helpful!

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FAQ: after some time, soil becomes compacted and roots in those dry pockets start to die. Some corresponding leaves will show signs of wilting (leaves curled up). If all you did was try to water more often, it may not help since water would drain right past the dry pocket. The best way to deal with this is to aerate the soil, which not only breaks up these pockets, but also encourages air flow to the roots (they need oxygen too). Aerating can be accomplished by GENTLY poking the soil with a chopstick. When you do this occasionally before watering, it helps the soil absorb more of the water you pour in instead of it draining through the drainage hole. Here I’m also using a turkey baster to remove the excess water after a few hours (this baster is dedicated for plants; don’t borrow the one in your kitchen!)

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Do you want to level up your #plantparenthood? Read my short blog post about soil aeration…your tropical foliage plants will be happier and live longer! (link in profile)

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Aerating your soil is essential for maintaining good soil structure and keeping your plants happy in the long run (this applies to most tropical foliage plants) #fittonia #nerveplant #timelapse #houseplantjournal #plants #gardening #leaf #botanical #greenthumb #greenery #foliage #plantlife #botany #urbanjungle #greenfingers #houseplants #indoorplants #plantlove #plantstagram #indoorgarden #instaplants #plantsarefriends #plantlover #indoorgardening

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Hi!
This is my first time owning a succulent, and I was wandering what it’s called and any tips to care for it? (My mom keeps saying I have to water it very often) I think the leaves might be painted but I’m not entirely sure. I saw some dead leaves on another one at the store and the pink was still there despite the rest being brown. (Also my cacti were painted and it was visible cause it was a sloppy job)


Hi,

This plant is painted, unfortunately. It should survive, as it has some green showing through, but it may take a while to grow out of it. I’d strongly recommend removing all the old soil and repotting it into a well-aerated soil mix. A 50/50 mix of perlite/potting soil would be good. The old soil has shrunken and become compacted, as you can see some empty space between the soil mass and the pot. This makes the soil hydrophobic and unable to take up water, slowly starving the plant. Repotting it into fresh soil remedies this. Keep it dry for a week after repotting and then you can give it some water. Keep it in a bright spot with some direct sunlight, water it roughly once every two weeks and it should do well.

Happy growing!