advice of today

It's okay to make mistakes...

You’ve done so much research but your furbaby/scale baby got sick or passed away. They needed different food. More hides. Different humidity. Everything went went wrong at once.
It’s okay. Breathe.
There is a lot of information out there, and it can take a while to figure out who can be trusted, and to take some advice with a grain of salt. There is always new information coming in
That being said, it is NOT OKAY to refuse to do research. To blatantly ignore advice as it is given to you. To rely on only one source of information.
Ignorance means that you are not willfully seeking the best care for your animals, and it is not an excuse.
So do your research, again and again, and share your experiences. The community will be here to guide those who are humble and caring, I’ve seen it first hand. We protect because we care.

ok but like I’ve decided that I should handle all my life problems like Stephen Strange

aka: fly into the dark void and kill myself, repeatedly. 

date night #9

roll down all of the windows. put on your favorite playlist. hold hands over the center console and just drive and tell each other all of the things you’d never tell anyone else.

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15.02.2017: Hi everyone, sorry for not posting any original content for so long!
I started uni last September in another country and I’ve been quite (super) stressed since then, so I didn’t take any time to take pictures or post any new stuff on here. But I’m back, so get ready for some posts from me!
It’s 7 am here and I woke up early, drank coffee (I had the prettiest coffee in Dubai some weeks ago, so I had to show you the picture up there) and am currently eating breakfast and trying to make a study plan for exams in 7 weeks (if you have any good advice - please message me). Today I have no lectures, so I’ll try to be super productive and catch up on my readings/doing outlines for one or two chapters for Social Psychology.
Have a great day & feel free to message me whenever you need help/have a question or just want to chat with another student who has no idea what she is doing with her life (just kidding)! xx Amber :) 

Saving and Backing Up Work Guide

Things my job and college taught me about saving and backing up work:

  1. Iterative saves. ITERATIVE SAVES!!! Make a new save every work session. EVERY SINGLE ONE. Also make one once you complete an important step (save for final sketch, save for inking one character, save for inking bg, save for animating a hand, save for first pass of animation). That way in case you accidentally delete a layer or your file gets corrupted, YOU DON’T HAVE TO START OVER!! Also this is good for when clients go “oh you know what, I actually like the look of this one thing from like 4 exchanges ago, can you change it to that?” Also in case the power goes out midsave and corrupts the file. Note: Google Drive automatically does iterative saves for a lot of things (docs, images, spreadsheets, etc) which is SUPER nice
  2.  If you work at company or are freelance that sends work files, please for all that’s good in the world, MAKE A SAVE BEFORE YOU MERGE YOUR STUFF IN A DRAWING PROGRAM! Some poor sap (possibly you) a year from now is going to have to tweek something and you are going to make their life an absolute hell when they find you’ve merged everything.
  3. Save on a portable hard drive or an internal drive. Back that drive up at LEAST once a year onto a different drive or onto CDs/DvDs/Bluerays.
  4. Save on Google Drive and/or dropbox. Have it on a cloud SOMEWHERE in case you need it. Especially for school projects because you probably will forget your portable hard drive at least once the day an assignment is due.
  5. If possible, keep your Operating System (Windows and/or Linux) on a SEPARATE harddrive from where you save your work. JUST IN CASE your OS gets corrupted and you have to wipe windows. So get two drives, one for OS and your programs, another for your work and other stuff you don’t want to get accidentally wiped.
  6. I know this is stupid and most people will ignore it, but have a naming convention for files. This way it’s easier to find in case something goes wrong or you have to find a file 2years later for whatever reason. A quick and easy one, Client_Project_Descriptor_#. Example: I’m doing a color piece intended for print with a rocket for SpaceX and this is the 4th time I’ve sat to work on it, I might do something like: SpaceX_PrintColor_Rocket_4. If you want something more specific for the work session number, you could do a time date stamp like YYYYMMDDHHmm (Year, month, day, hour, minute). There’s lots of variations, but that’s the easiest one I’ve done.
  7. If you think about saving, save. If you’re working with other people, just saying “SAVE” out loud when you think about it. In school and at my job, a lot of people appreciated the reminder. This is especially appreciated if you notice something in your cube/side of the room flicker (an indicator that the power is about to turn off).
  8. LEARN THE CORRECT SHORT CUT KEYS FOR SAVING! This is handy if your computer is hooked up to a power backup. Some places ONLY have the computer towers attached to it AND NOT THE MONITORS. So using the shortcut key, is very important.
  9. Learn where programs save automatic backups and/or temp work files. If a program crashes, DO NOT IMMEDIATELY OPEN THE PROGRAM OR RESTART YOUR COMPUTER IF YOU CAN. Google where the temporary files are kept, there may be a backup that way. This isn’t reliable and sometimes the file is partially corrupted, but this has saved my ass so many times with different programs
  10. Have a saving “ritual” when you’re done working. What I mean is: name properly, local save, cloud save, flattened/combine/viewable save (png, jpg, pdf, obj, fbx, ect).

anonymous asked:

Hello! So I was scouring the Internet for advice today but I couldn't find any on this topic. My problem isn't that I don't have any ideas (I probably have too many) but the problem is that I don't LOVE any of my ideas. I like them. I think they're all fine ideas. But liking them isn't going to motivate me long enough to finish a novel. How can I give my ideas that extra uumph to make me love them? How can I figure out what's missing or why I don't feel this way about any of my ideas?

Hello, nonny!  What a challenging question…  This one’s been in my inbox a couple days, just because it’s such a big question.  But I’ve thought it over and I think I have some ideas for you :)


The Thrill Is Gone – How to Find It Again

So generally, there’s no one answer or cure-all to this problem.  I’ve had this issue multiple times, with different causes.  My first novel didn’t have enough meat to the plot; my second novel had been over-planned in my head to the point that it no longer excited me.  My third novel had way too much plot, so that by the time I got ¾ the way through, I’d written over 200K words and felt sick of the idea.  I started my fourth novel way too soon, and am now going back and planning it more!  So there are obviously many different reasons that a story doesn’t take off (or dries up eventually).

The first step is to figure out what’s missing, like you said.  There are a few aspects of your story to assess…


1. Plot

I’m discussing plot first because, to me, it’s the most important part of fiction.  Plot, conflict, and stakes are foremost to my stories.  You could have the most complex and sympathetic characters, but without plot, they’re static and become boring.  But for some reason, this is the part of story ideas that new authors neglect most!

So if your story has great characters and an immersive setting, but you can’t get into it, try asking a few questions about your plot:

  • What is the point of the plot?  What’s the message you’re conveying in the story?  Even if your story isn’t an allegory or a metaphor or the next Chronicles of Narnia, there should always be a conclusion to which all plots arrive – otherwise, the story can feel aimless.  The best way to find your message is to look at the conflicts involved (e.g. Man vs. Man, Man vs. Nature, etc.) and find the “winner”.  What worldview, belief, or concept “defeats” the other concepts?  It can be as simple as Good vs. Evil, or more complex, like Loving the Sincere Drug Addict vs. Settling for the Selfish Dentist (provokes the question “Is love worth danger in relationships?”).
  • Does the plot have ups and downs?  And really consider both ends of the spectrum here.  Stories become dull if they are made up of victory after victory – or if they’re made up of nothing but loss and tragedy.  No matter the genre, you have to strike some sort of balance, lest the story become predictable and emotionally non-engaging.  Find victories and failures, even in unassuming places, to keep readers invested and hopeful.
  • Do you have a satisfactory ending?  Or do you have the ending     planned yet?  I’ve found that I can’t really commit to an idea unless I see a resolution – otherwise I feel too nervous to start.  If you do have an ending planned, make sure it’s the right ending.  It can feel like there’s one possible conclusion, and once you’ve found it, you stick to it – but question it, brainstorm it.  It may not be a happy ending every time, but when you find the right one, you’ll know it.
  • Do you have the right plot at all?  Look at your story as a whole.  Does it start too early or too late, relative to the real meat,     the real action?  Is it told from the most impactful POV?  Does the plot cover too much ground for one book, or is it not enough to fill the pages?  Consider all the characters, backstories, and subplots you have, and ask yourself if any of them are more interesting than the main plot.  If so, shift your focus.  Use them instead.

2. Characters

Maybe it’s not your plot that’s going sideways.  Maybe you have it all worked out – the head, the tail, the whole damn thing – but it still doesn’t feel right.  It doesn’t feel like it’s coming to life, somehow.  It feels flat.

That can be a character problem.  It would be like sitting by the campfire and hearing the most fascinating, horrifying story, except it’s told by a man with The Most Boring Voice Who Talks So Incredibly Slowly and Takes All the Fun Out of Everything.  An example: The Hunger Games.  Those books bored the crap out of me.  Unless someone was being killed or Haymitch and Effie were interacting, I just didn’t care.  And those books had a great plot behind them!

So here’s what you need for a good cast of characters:

  • A solid protagonist.  Solid = three-dimensional, empathetic, and relatable; having a goal, an internal conflict, a self-image, and fears or shame.  They should have different facets of themselves – their head and their heart, their desires and doubts, and that little voice in their head that says, “Give up on that.  Be realistic.”  Give them strengths, weaknesses, and a couple of bad habits, for kicks.
  • A variety of supporting characters.  You don’t have to have thirty characters + six secret characters stuffed under your trench coat; but with however many characters you have, make them as different from each other as possible.  Give them some similarities, of course, so that they can relate to each other – but never make them so close together that you have to decide, “Who should say this line?  Character A or Character B?”  Make them unique enough that the words come out of their mouths, instead of you having to decide where to put the words, yourself.
  • Relationships, relationships, relationships.  And I’m not talking about romantic relationships.  I mean, sure, those too – but there are many different kinds of relationships to explore.  Friendships, enemy-ships (?), parent relationships, sibling-ships, silent alliances, “annoying friend-of-a-friend”-ships, “my-ex’s-little-sister”-ships, “you’re-the-ruler-of-the-galaxy-and-a-Sith-lord-but-also-my-dad-please-stop-being-evil”-ships…  You get the idea.  Make them unique, make them strong, and allow them to evolve over the course of the story.
  • Diverse morals, interests, and personalities.  My first short stories focused on white middle-class people who were culturally and politically identical.  They lived in one house, usually, and watched the same TV shows and made the same references.  They had the same sense of humor.  They rarely disagreed on anything that wasn’t clear-cut (e.g. “You drank the last Pepsi!”  “I was thirsty!”).  So do yourself a favor and don’t make my mistakes.  Give your characters unique ethics, cultures, backgrounds, personalities, goals, appearances, and conflicts.  You’ll be more invested by then, I’m sure.

3. Setting

Lastly, I’d like to add that while your characters and plot could be well-developed, there’s always a chance that they’re placed in the wrong setting.  This is why many story ideas can seem great, but won’t get off the ground – maybe they’re set in a pre-made universe like Middle Earth or Panem when they could be their own story.  Maybe your tragic romance is set in the middle of apocalyptic war, when instead, it should be drained down to a period piece.  Maybe your story is perfect, except you’re writing it too close to home – in the real world, in the present year.  There are a million factors to picking the right setting, including:

  • Applicable history and culture.  If you’re writing a story about someone who’s oppressed, or someone who’s a politician, or someone who’s a witch, you’re going to need to back that up with history.  Develop a history for the oppression or politics or witchcraft – where these things began, how they developed over time – and a culture for them now – how oppressed people survive and how witches in your world interact, etc.
  • Imaginative scenery, influenced by the characters.  Even if your story takes place in New York City in 2017, allow your characters’ living spaces and workplaces to have a unique touch – colors and quirks that your readers can see in their mind.  If even you can’t see what you’re writing, inspiration is going to be difficult to find.
  • A lifelike background.  Just because the plot focuses on your characters does not mean everything going on behind it should be quiet and dead.  Anyone who looks out a window in a city building can see other people living – people on the highway will see other cars taking other people other places.  Everyone who has a friend will hear a little something about their friend’s siblings, their friend’s friends, their friend’s neighbors.  Life and stories exist outside of your plot; make sure you’re not writing about a ship in a bottle.
  • An aesthetic.  That sounds gross and teen-tumblr-y, but let me tell you personally: I don’t feel truly ready to write (and love) my story until I can hear the music for the future movie adaptation – until I can see the kind of clothes the people wear, the games they play, the places they eat and shop.  I think of the colors and themes in my scenes (e.g. my first novel was set primarily at night in a grunge/city setting; my current novel is very green and outdoorsy and gives me that feeling of bonfires just after sunset).  Once you get that “feeling” from your story, you’ll know it.

Anyway, this reply took me like three days to write because I really wanted to get into it.  I hope some of this helps you to fall in love with one of your ideas, so you can get started :)  If you have any more questions, be sure to send them in!

(I have 26 questions in the inbox, though, so be patient with me…)


If you need advice on writing, fanfiction, or NaNoWriMo, you should maybe ask me!

Ayato vs. Subaru Mini Drama
Ayato (CV. Midorikawa Hikaru) & Subaru (CV. Kondo Takashi)
Ayato vs. Subaru Mini Drama

[ Versus Song Requiem(2) Bloody Night Vol.I ]

Ayato vs. Subaru Mini Drama Translation

ヽ(・ω・ゞ) Good evening, dear sinners~! This track got requested a lot, so here it is! Now that I finished Yuma’s DF route, I’m gonna start completing the random requests in my spreadsheets. _(┐「ε:)_ I’m not sure if this has been done already, so my apologies if it has (I searched around and didn’t find anything).

As usual, audio translating isn’t my forte, so I apologize if I misheard or anything.

Note: I used “You” throughout the translation’s action phrases that you’ll see in parenthesis. It was easier that way, so don’t hurt me please.

The mini drama is about 18min. ☆ミ(o*・ω・)ノ Enjoy these two rough mouths~




(Struggling Noises; Wind’s Blowing As Subaru’s Flying)



Subaru: Geez, you’re such a pain!  I told you to stop moving. Don’t you understand!? Someone as stupid as you should know what’ll happen if you try to separate from me now. Hah? Well, if you wanna fall, be my guest. Ahh, but it wouldn’t be bad seeing you like a squashed tomato after falling to the ground. Heheh.



Subaru: Hey, what’re you gonna do? *fixes grip on Subaru* Heheh, you should’ve done that from the start. You really are a pesky woman. Oi, cling to me more. Tch, more!



Subaru: That’s it. That’s better. Your neck’s finally close. Heh…Ah? Damn it. Pisses me off seeing that guy’s fang marks. Hah? Don’t play dumb. It’s obvious what I gotta do. *bites and sucks*


Keep reading

youtube

Today I’m talking about the ~art school experience~, I hope it’s helpful! ;w;

the art of skipping class.

listen. i don’t recommend skipping class. ever. i barely ever do it. i hadn’t even done it before college. but i get it. sometimes, desperate times call for desperate measures. here are some things you should think about before you skip, as well as some tips if you decided to rebel.

first things first : why do you want to skip class ? ask yourself this. find a decent answer. 

  • are you sick ? if so, are you so sick that you can’t get out of bed ? are you so sick you know you won’t be able to concentrate ? in those cases, stay home. otherwise, go to school. 
  • are you unable to get out of bed due to your blankets being too comfortable ? dude. go. this is not a good excuse.
  • are you behind on your homework ? do you have an essay to write ? an exam to study for ? i personally think that it’s a good reason. it’s almost always my excuse for skipping a class.
  • is the class boring ? NOT good enough. but can you get all the material from the power points or the textbook ? good enough. 

so you decided to skip class ? here’s what you should do. 

  • ask somebody for their notes. it’s simple. a friend, a stranger, who cares. finding notes is essential !
  • if the teacher provides power points, make sure you use it. i recommend recopying (by hand or on the computer) the slides and using it as a base. if you know the teacher reads the power points and doesn’t really add any info, that should pretty much be enough. 
  • make sure you do the assigned reading VERY seriously and use your reading notes to add onto your power point notes.
  • if there is additional reading, do it. even if you never do it. it’ll help, i promise. 
  • in the extreme cases where you can’t get someone’s notes, don’t have access to a power point/any other support and don’t have any readings, there are a few things you can do. if you know what that specific class was about, find some ressources online. if there is nothing on the subject well good luck friend !

the art of skipping class, simplified. 

  • don’t skip class if there is an exam/assignment the following week.
  • don’t skip class if you are graded on participation, even if it’s only 1% ! every percent counts !!
  • don’t skip class just because your friends are skipping. you are your own person. be responsable.
  • don’t skip class to piss your parents off.
  • do skip class if you truly feel terrible. don’t force yourself too much.
  • do skip class if you’re very familiar with the topic. in college, you will often learn the same things in different classes. if you already know the subject, skip. 
  • choose your battles : don’t skip just because the teacher is boring but do skip if the teacher reads his power points. don’t skip classes with no visual/textual support but do skip the ones where the teacher provides summaries of the lecture.
  • try not to skip two lectures in a row and even more importantly, don’t skip more than 25% of the lectures. your grades WILL suffer.