adapted from a novel

5

霸王别姬 (Farewell My Concubine). Dir. Chen Kaige. 1993.

Chen Kaige’s Farewell My Concubine (1993), adapted from a novel of the same name by Lilian Lee, is a sweeping epic that follows the relationship between two Peking Opera stars, Cheng Dieyi (Leslie Cheung) and Duan Xiaolou (Zhang Fengyi) as they navigate the tumultuous political landscape of 20th century China. Set in Beijing, the film covers a span of 53 years and begins in the 1920s, depicting Dieyi and Xiaolou’s brutal opera training, their eventual rise to fame, and their subsequent struggle to survive and maintain the glory of Peking opera, all against the backdrop of the Japanese invasion, the Chinese Civil War, and the Cultural Revolution.

The name of the film references one of the famous operas that Dieyi and Xiaolou star in, in which Dieyi plays the role of Concubine Yu, who commits suicide out of loyalty to the Chu king, performed by Xiaolou. Dieyi, who is trained as a dan (female) performer, develops an ambiguous gender identity and blurs opera with reality, falling in love with and becoming deeply committed to Xiaolou. Xiaolou does not return his affections and instead marries a prostitute named Juxian, played by the then-rising star actress Gong Li. The film simultaneously depicts the bitter love triangle between Dieyi, Xiaolou, and Juxian, while also weaving personal trauma into a national allegory of the Chinese state.

Farewell My Concubine is considered as a representative work of China’s Fifth Generation film movement. It received international acclaim and won the prestigious Palmes d’Or award at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival.

most lgbt movies you see recommended are rated r, sexually explicit, etc etc. while that’s honestly great to see and something i’m personally okay with, it leaves kids and people who DON’T want to see sex alienated.

*Please note that I have not seen all or most of these movies. I will be updating this list as I find more/watch unrated ones that can be placed here. Let me know if I missed any!

Last Updated: 5/4/17

thus, here’s a list of lgbt movies that aren’t rated r:

  • The Pearl of Africa, TV-14: “In this intimate documentary, Ugandan transgender woman Cleopatra Kambugu struggles and prevails as she lives in an actively transphobic environment.”
  • Jenny’s Wedding, PG-13: “When Jenny plans to marry her girlfriend, she decides it’s time that her family, who doesn’t know she’s a lesbian, finally learns the truth.”
  • The Out List, TV-PG: “Activists, entertainers, athletes and politicians are among those profiled in this thought-provoking portrait of notable LGBT personalities.”
  • Growing Up Coy, TV-PG: “Filmmakers follow a Colorado family’s highly public battle for the rights of their transgender daughter, Coy, in a landmark civil rights case.”
  • My Transgender Kid, TV-14: “Two British families discuss the challenges they face raising children who identify as a gender different from the one they were assigned at birth.”
  • Gayby Baby, PG: “This documentary follows four youngsters as they navigate the challenges of their preteen years, including society’s bias against their gay parents.”
  • Margarita with a Straw, TV-14: “An Indian woman with cerebral palsy decides to study in New York, where she becomes involved in a life-changing affair with a blind female activist.”
  • Who’s Gonna Love Me Now?, TV-14: “A gay London man faces a positive HIV diagnosis and a decision on whether to stay with loving friends or return to his estranged parents in Israel.”
  • Game Face, TV-14: “This documentary follows the struggle of transgender MMA fighter Fallon Fox and gay basketball player Terrence Clemens for acceptance by their sports.”
  • Kumu Hina, TV-14: “This year captures a year in the life of native Hawaiian transgender teacher Hina Wong-Kalu, who embodies mahu, a sacred spirit both male and female.”
  • Big Eden, PG-13: “Henry Hart returns to Big Eden and winds up confronting his unrequited passion for his high school best friend and his feelings about being gay.”
  • Rent, PG-13: “This is the film version of the Pulitzer and Tony Award winning musical about Bohemians in the East Village of New York City struggling with life, love and AIDS, and the impacts they have on America.”
  • D.E.B.S., PG-13: “Plaid-skirted schoolgirls are groomed by a secret government agency to become the newest members of the elite national-defense group, D.E.B.S.”
  • I Am Not Your Negro, PG-13: “The late black and gay writer James Baldwin is given new voice in I Am Not Your Negro. Director Raoul Peck offers viewers the opportunity to spend 90 minutes with Baldwin’s words — his interviews, manuscripts, and influences — which offer his honest and illuminating insights on race in America.”
  • I Can’t Think Straight, PG-13: “A 2008 romance film adapted from a same name novel about a London-based Jordanian of Palestinian descent, Tala, who is preparing for an elaborate wedding. A turn of events causes her to have an affair and subsequently fall in love with another woman, Leyla, a British Indian.”
  • The World Unseen, PG-13: “A drama centered on two women who engage in a dangerous relationship during South Africa’s apartheid era.”
  • Caramel, PG: “A romantic comedy centered on the daily lives of five Lebanese women living in Beirut.”
  • You Are Not Alone, UR: “Two precocious boys explore their sexuality at boarding school.”
  • Bend it like Beckham, PG-13: “The daughter of orthodox Sikh rebels against her parents’ traditionalism and joins a football team.”
  • Camp, PG-13: “After a series of Broadway flops, songwriter Bert Hanley (Dixon) goes to work at a musical camp for young performers. Inspired by the kids, he finds an opportunity to regain success by staging an altogether new production.”
  • Chutney Popcorn, PG-13: “Reena is a young Indian American lesbian who lives and works in New York. Her sister Sarita, who is happily married, discovers that she is infertile. Reena offers to be a surrogate mother for her sister’s baby, hoping to improve her relationship with their mother, who disapproves of Reena’s sexual orientation. Reena has second thoughts when her girlfriend Lisa feels left out.”
  • The Family Stone, PG-13: “An uptight, conservative businesswoman accompanies her boyfriend to his eccentric and outgoing family’s annual Christmas celebration and finds that she’s a fish out of water in their free-spirited way of life.”
  • Saved!, PG-13: “When a girl attending a Christian high school becomes pregnant, she finds herself ostracized and demonized, as all of her former friends turn on her.”
  • To Wong Foo Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar, PG-13: “Three drag queens travel cross-country until their car breaks down, leaving them stranded in a small town.”
  • Victor Victoria, PG: “A struggling female soprano finds work playing a male female impersonator, but it complicates her personal life.”
  • Far From Heaven, PG-13: “In 1950s Connecticut, a housewife faces a marital crisis and mounting racial tensions in the outside world.”
  • Philadelphia, PG-13: “When a man with HIV is fired by his law firm because of his condition, he hires a homophobic small time lawyer as the only willing advocate for a wrongful dismissal suit.”
  • Beautiful Daughters, TV-14: “In February, 2004, with the help of Eve Ensler and Jane Fonda, a group of transgender women put on the first all-transgender production of “The Vagina Monologues”, including a new monologue written by Ensler from their own experiences.”
  • Zorro: The Gay Blade, PG: “In 1840’s Mexico, wealthy landowner Don Diego Vega learns of his late father’s secret as Zorro, the masked folk hero, and Vega adopts his new persona. But when Vega is incapacitated by an injury, he asks Ramon, his very gay, long-lost twin brother (now calling himself ‘Bunny’), to replace him as the caped hero, who makes some drastic changes to his Zorro persona.”
  • We Think the World of You, PG: “An aimless young man, Johnny, is sent prison. He entrusts his beloved dog, Evie, to the care of his former lover and best friend, Frank. When he gets out of prison, he has to face difficulties at home. Added to this, is the fact that he may have to give up Evie to Frank.”
  • EDIT: Nina’s Heavenly Delights, PG-13: “A feisty young woman returns to Glasgow to run her deceased father’s curry house.”
  • EDIT: The Color Purple, PG-13: “A black Southern woman struggles to find her identity after suffering abuse from her father and others over four decades.”
5

Rouge (胭脂扣). Dir. Stanley Kwan. 1988.

An adaptation from the novel by Lilian Lee, Rouge is part period drama, part ghost story, melding together elements of romance and the supernatural to slowly unveil a moving story about the inevitability of change. Fleur, an alluring courtesan working at a flourishing brothel in 1930s Hong Kong, falls madly in love with the 12th Master, Chan Chen-pang, who comes from a wealthy family. Their torrid, doomed love affair comes to an end when, realizing they can never be together, the two decide to commit suicide by overdosing on opium. 

The film travels between flashbacks to the 1930s, and scenes set in present-day 1980s Hong Kong, where Fleur returns as a ghost after spending 50 years in the afterlife waiting for the 12th Master. Believing that he is still alive, Fleur searches for her lover among the strange, unfamiliar streets that used to be her home, and grapples with the realization that both her lover and the Hong Kong she once knew could be long gone.

Rouge stars Anita Mui and Leslie Cheung, two wildly successful Cantopop idols at the time, whose performances in this film established their acting potential. A classic of 1980s Hong Kong cinema, Rouge will forever be remembered for its two stars, and in retrospect its eerily fateful storyline, as both Anita and Leslie ultimately passed away in the same year.

cbr.com
How Orlando Jones Influenced American Gods' Shocking Opening Scene
Orlando Jones was such a fan of Neil Gaiman's American Gods, he campaigned for the role of Mr. Nancy/Anansi.

Orlando Jones has long loved Neil Gaiman’s sci-fi/fantasy classic “American Gods.” So when the “Sleepy Hollow” star heard a daring adaptation would bring its road-trip tale of warring gods to television, he took to Twitter to publicly campaign for the role of the charming but unnerving Mr. Nancy/Anansi.

Overheard: “They should totally cast #OrlandoJones as Mr. Nancy in @AmericanGodsSTZ” Oh wait, that was just me talking out loud @neilhimself

— Orlando Jones (@TheOrlandoJones) March 3, 2016

“American Gods” co-creators Michael Green and Bryan Fuller were quick to agree that Jones would be prefect for the part of the fascinating West African god. While fans have seen teases of Mr. Nancy in character posters and trailers, the series’ second episode “The Secret of Spoon” will finally unleash his fiery introduction, but for those who cannot wait, Starz has unveiled it online ahead of the episode’s airing.

Ahead of “American Gods” television debut, CBR sat down with showrunners/executive producers Fuller and Green to discuss the finer points of adapting such a dense and intense novel, which tackles so many complicated topics, including racial tension in the modern America. When asked what challenges they–as two white men–found in writing about race issues from diverse angles, Green pointed to Jones’ influence, specifically in the execution of this pivotal and shocking scene.

“There’s always the danger of getting something very wrong,” Green said. “So you come to it as thoughtfully as possible. And you go to people who can help you and steer you.”

“In the case of Mr. Nancy,” Green continued. “We always knew that we would be writing something that we would then have to talk to our actor about. And that was talking to Orlando Jones. When we got on the phone with him and talked about becoming Mr. Nancy, we were fans of his. He had tweeted about wanting the role, so he was already very inclined.”

“Just within the first 30 seconds of talking to him, we could just hear the voice,” Green recounted. “And knowing that we had an actor who was so talented, and so deep, and so thoughtful about religion and race in America, we could ask him, ‘Hey how are we doing here? We are doing something very dicey about The Middle Passage and revenge fantasy.”

“And yes, we’re reading the news and reacting to it,” Green explained. “But obviously our experience isn’t going to be the same. ‘How are we doing?’ So we’d talk about that, and he’d talk about the actual voices he wanted to use, because a lot of it was not just in the words chosen but when to show what level of anger. What is the relationship to anger? Which is essentially the thrust of the speech.”

“So (that scene) is nothing without him,” Green concluded. “And us handing it to him and wanting him to mold it in his own experience.”

Expect to see more of Mr. Nancy (and Jones), as Fuller and Green have teased their “American Gods” adaptation will also feature scenes from Gaiman’s spinoff novel, “Anansi Boys.”

“American Gods” airs on Starz Sunday nights at 9PM.

8

The Handmaiden (2016)

The Handmaiden (Hangul: 아가씨; RR: Agassi; lit. “Lady”) is a 2016 South Korean erotic psychological thriller film directed by Park Chan-wook and starring Kim Min-hee, Ha Jung-woo and Kim Tae-ri. It is adapted from the novel Fingersmith by Welsh writer Sarah Waters, with the setting changed from the Victorian era to Korea under Japanese colonial rule. The film was selected to compete for the Palme d'Or at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival. (x)

ew.com
'American Gods' Just Became the Most Important Show on TV


It’s a curious time to be an American — this much is incontrovertible. And as much as audiences are using pop culture to escape questions about our country’s identity, there’s value in turning to art for answers, too. It seems no television show is in a better position to address the topic of what it means to be an American than Starz’s American Gods (premiering April 30).

There’s a lot of important television right now, as there always has been: HBO’s Big Little Lies just triumphed in representing authentic female companionship; Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why is lifting a veil on teen mental health; Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale, premiering next week and adapted from Margaret Atwood’s 1985 novel of the same name, arrives in Trump’s America as a cautionary harbinger of a totalitarian future. But strip away the supernatural cadence of American Gods — a show based on a fantasy novel about holy hidden figures who live among us, some of them cosmically powerful and others barely living on a prayer — and what’s left is something viewers are unlikely to find anywhere else on narrative television: an ensemble of immigrants trying to make it in a country actively turning against them.

For those still hungry for more Beauty and The Beast

If you’re looking for something to satisfy your budding Beauty and The Beast obsession while waiting for the new live action Disney film to come to video (in twelve weeks) here are a few things that might tide you over.

First I highly recommend the original 1740 Beauty and the Beast novel La Belle et la Bete by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve.  It’s roughly two hundred pages long and there are two unabridged editions available right now on Amazon.  Both are the same translation, they just divide the chapters differently.

This one is soft cover and has more chapter breaks (Otherwise they have the same text)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1502992973/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

  And this one is hard cover with less chapter breaks and is also illustrated with “interactive games” built in.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0062456210/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

My second recommendation is for the Beauty and The Beast Broadway musical album.  It has songs that don’t appear in the animated film or live action Beauty and The Beast and one song on the album “Home” was used as an instrumental in the 2017 Beauty and The Beast.

  https://www.amazon.com/Beauty-Beast-Broadway-Various-artists/dp/B01MTFJO7U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1490504090&sr=8-1&keywords=Beauty+and+the+Beast+Broadway

There is a 1987 Beauty and the Beast released by Canon.  This one has songs and is very true to the fairy tale adapted from the novel (but not so much the actual novel.)

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3g3tfl

There is also the 1947 French film, the first film version of Beauty and The Beast (to my knowledge).

https://www.amazon.com/Beauty-Beast-Criterion-Collection-Marais/dp/B00007L4I6/ref=sr_1_22?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1490504615&sr=1-22&keywords=Beauty+And+the+Beast

There is the 1987 Beauty and The Beast TV series (far superior to the recent one from CW). 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L9CDUAK/ref=pd_luc_rh_sbs_03_03_t_img_lh?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

There is also the TV series Once Upon a Time which merges the story of Rumplestiltskin with Beauty and The Beast and has Rumplestiltskin as The Beast in his glittering, scaled imp form.   The most blatant Beauty and the Beast aspects are in the season one episode Skin Deep.

https://www.amazon.com/Once-Upon-Time-Season-1/dp/B0058YPL66

My seventh recommendation is the 2014 Beauty and The Beast French movie.

You may have seen this one on display in stores as it was shamelessly released in the US at the same time as the new live action Disney film.  The 2014 Beauty and the Beast movie only recently got an American DVD / Blu Ray Release partly because of the new Disney animated film  

https://www.amazon.com/Beauty-Beast-Vincent-Cassel/dp/B01N3S0404/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1490504277&sr=8-8&keywords=Beauty+and+The+Beast+DVD

You can watch it in French, or with English dub or English subtitles.  

The 2014 Beauty and The Beast is a bit odd but visually very pretty.   It doesn’t quite follow the novel but has elements of the novel and much like the Disney film it kind of does it’s own thing. 

In this version The Prince’s backstory is told in periodic flashbacks.   He was married to a beautiful woman and he became obsessed with hunting a golden hind (a magical deer).  His wife made him promise to stop hunting to animal and he agreed.   However he went back on his word and carried out the hunt anyway, killing the creature with a golden arrow (the only thing that could kill the golden hind).  As she was dying the golden hind transformed into his wife, revealing that she had been a forest nymph all along. 

Her father, the God of the Forest, punished the prince by turning him into a Beast, his companions into statues, and his hunting dogs into strange, large eyed, bunny-like creatures.

In this version Belle is the reincarnation of the wife he accidentally killed.   It’s visually very pretty but I don’t really feel the chemistry between Belle and The Beast in this one and in fact Belle is kind of vicious toward him a few times. 

I have mixed feelings about this one’s writing but it’s visually gorgeous and it has a sort of Gothic ambiance.

okay now imagine John getting excited about something, John running up the stairs with the mail in his hand shouting, Sherlock, they said yes, they said yes! They’re publishing me! and barreling into the kitchen with the letter from a publisher accepting the novel John adapted from the blog and there’s Sherlock sitting on his stool, looking up from his microscope, and even though Sherlock had been supportive when John had started talking about turning the blog into a novel, suddenly crashing through John’s mind is every complaint Sherlock had ever made about the blog being over-romanticised and inaccurate, but then Sherlock smiles that big smile, the one where he has too many chins and the lines around his eyes sink down into his cheeks, and he jumps off his stool and dashes across the kitchen and pulls John into his arms and laughs and maybe lifts John off his feet a tiny bit and says, of course they did, they’d be fools not to, and kisses him with the grin still on his mouth and then rests his forehead on John’s and giggles and whispers Congratulations, John, in the softest most genuine voice, Sherlock excited about the things John is excited about, Sherlock supporting John, Sherlock wanting John to succeed, yes please

Advance Bravely

China // 2017 // ? episodes

Series adapted from the novel Shi Bu Ke Dang by Cha Jidan (same author of Addicted and Strike Back).

Yuan Zong is an ex-special forces soldier and owns a bodyguard company. His sister asks him to help her get a date with the boxer Xia Yao. Yuan Zong accepts her request and starts stalking him.

These episodes were not officially released, they were leaked.

variety.com
Benedict Cumberbatch’s Company to Adapt Novel ‘The End We Start From’ Into Movie (EXCLUSIVE)
Benedict Cumberbatch’s SunnyMarch and Hera Pictures have acquired the feature film rights to Megan Hunter’s hotly anticipated debut novel, “The End We Start From.” The book,…
By Justin Kroll

Benedict Cumberbatch’s SunnyMarch and Hera Pictures have acquired the feature film rights to Megan Hunter’s hotly anticipated debut novel, “The End We Start From.”

The book, published by Picador this week, follows a new mother and her newborn, who are turned into refugees following an environmental crisis in the U.K. Forced to leave their home after London is submerged in flood waters, the family must search for safety in a country thrown into chaos.

“‘The End We Start From’ is a stunning tale of motherhood,” Cumberbatch said. “Megan has crafted a striking and frighteningly real story of a family fighting for survival that will make everyone stop and think about what kind of planet we are leaving behind for our children. We’re beyond thrilled to be bringing this story to life.”

“This exquisite piece of writing is profoundly moving,” Hera Pictures founder Liza Marshall said. “It captures the deep love between a mother and child while forcing us all to consider what the world could become if climate change destabilized everything we take for granted. Megan has written something very special and unique and we’re excited and honored to have the opportunity to make it into a film.”

The movie will be produced by Cumberbatch, Marshall, Adam Ackland, and Sophie Hunter.

“I am absolutely delighted that such a talented, passionate, and dynamic team will be working together to create a film version of ‘The End We Start From,‘” Hunter said. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to see my work translated into a new medium, particularly by a group of people with such a heartfelt appreciation of the book. I can’t wait to see what emerges from this exciting collaboration.”

Since launching the banner in 2013, SunnyMarch has quietly built an exciting slate that includes an adaptation of Matt Haig’s upcoming book “How to Stop Time” and Geoffrey Household’s classic British novel “Rogue Male.” SunnyMarch’s TV arm, supported by StudioCanal, is producing TV adaptations of Ian McEwan’s “The Child in Time” and Edward St Aubyn’s Patrick Melrose novels.

“Come on Jack, put it away. You know you’re not going to use it.”

Michael Caine, Get Carter [1971]

Adapted from the novel Jack’s Return Home, Get Carter portrayed a grittier version of the criminal underworld than British cinema fans had previously been used to. Caine played the titular Carter, returning to Newcastle to avenge the death of his brother. The Guardian named it the seventh best crime film of all time.

youtube

No Game No Life Zero Film CM; opens 2017. The movie will adapt the events from the 6th volume of the light novel.

-Staff-

  • Director: Atsuko Ishizuka
  • Script: Jukki Hanada
  • Character Designer: Satoshi Tazaki
  • Animation Production: MADHOUSE

American Gods just became the most important show on TV

It’s a curious time to be an American — this much is incontrovertible. And as much as audiences are using pop culture to escape questions about our country’s identity, there’s value in turning to art for answers, too. It seems no television show is in a better position to address the topic of what it means to be an American than Starz’s American Gods (premiering April 30).

There’s a lot of important television right now, as there always has been: HBO’s Big Little Lies just triumphed in representing authentic female companionship; Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why is lifting a veil on teen mental health; Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale, premiering next week and adapted from Margaret Atwood’s 1985 novel of the same name, arrives in Trump’s America as a cautionary harbinger of a totalitarian future. But strip away the supernatural cadence of American Gods — a show based on a fantasy novel about holy hidden figures who live among us, some of them cosmically powerful and others barely living on a prayer — and what’s left is something viewers are unlikely to find anywhere else on narrative television: an ensemble of immigrants trying to make it in a country actively turning against them.

“These gods were manifested into reality by their believers who migrated to America and then died and left them essentially powerless, and now they’re just trying to find their way in the world,” executive producer Bryan Fuller, who runs the show with fellow executive producer Michael Green, explains. “There’s a broken quality to each of these characters, a fallen quality. It’s about people who have found themselves strangers in a strange land, trying to make their way the best they can. It’s hard not to see how human their experience is. It’s an immigration story much more than a god story.”

2

News: Lost Girls Volume 2 (Japanese | English)



Original Release Date:
August 9th, 2016 (J) | February 28th, 2017 (E)
Retail Price: 463 Yen (J) | $10.99 (E)
Pages: 194 (J) | 192 (E)


Following the first volume, the second and final volume of the Lost Girls manga features Mikasa on the cover!

Lost Girls was adapted by Fuji Ryosuke from the spin-off novel of the same title by Seko Koji. The original novel was released in December 2014 (Japanese) and June 28th, 2016 (English), while the manga chapters ran in Bessatsu Shonen from August 2015 to May 2016.

Forsaken: UK Shadowhunters Con Recap

Hi all! So I went to Forsaken this weekend, if you don’t know what that is, it was a Shadowhunters con in London with Maxim Roy (Jocelyn), Jon Cor (Hodge), Kaitlyn Leeb (Camille) and Joel Labelle (Alaric).

It was so much fun, and since it was their first con/they’re not the main cast it was so small, nice and chill. They were all so down to earth, humbled and overwhelmed that we came to see/speak to them. They each had two panels (one on each day) and a full guest panel, I’ve managed to write up most of what I can remember below. Obviously there’s a lot I haven’t captured, but highlights/best moments are under the cut!

A lot of things we discussed were personal/non-Shadowhunter related, if you just want to read the bits to do with the show, just read the bits that have been bolded.

Keep reading