adaptation movie

See Jim Broadbent, Michelle Dockery, Charlotte Rampling, and Harriet Walter shine in The Sense of an Ending, adapted from Julian Barnes’ award-winning novel.

seeing Beauty and the Beast in hyper-realistic CGI has forced me to re-evaluate the entire concept of the movie. Like the whole “talking furniture” thing was adorable & COOL in animated-form, but in reality it’s like a fuckin horror movie. You’re trapped in a place where cups have EYES and literally anything could’ve been an ex-person. That spoon you just licked clean? A person. That chair you’ve been sitting on? Practically someone’s LAP. That toilet in your bathroom? Oh-ho-hooo bOY DO I HAVE SOME NEWS FOR YOU.  

the ‘no longer human’ (2010) that you probably haven’t seen (and nakahara chuuya’s significant role in dazai osamu’s life)

You read that right. ‘Ningen shikkaku’, or as we know it, ‘No Longer Human’ had a movie that came out on 2010, directed by Genjiro Arato and starring Toma Ikuta as Oba Yozo (and to a lesser extent, Dazai Osamu). 

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  • Movie adaptation of book: *happens*
  • Me: did you include this character which regularly appears, not particularly to drive the plot forward but is beloved nonetheless?
  • Movie: uh, no
  • Me: how about this scene that provides important background information about this character?
  • Movie: hmmm... no
  • Me: what about a line from the books which is simply iconic and quoted frequently by the fandom?
  • Movie: *pretending to be entranced by a bird out of the window* maybe not
  • Me: well then, surely you didn't include this scene where a loved character dies in a heart wrenching moment that is not 100% necessary to the story and I'm not sure my heart can cope with experiencing it again
  • Movie: oh ya, I remembered that bit
Books V.S Movies
  • Book: This character is Asian.
  • Movie: White
  • Book: This character is black
  • Movie: WHite
  • Book: We don't describe what they're skin color is to leave it to the imagination.
  • Movie: WHIte
  • Book: This character is a dark tan.
  • Movie: WHITe
  • Book: This character is a POC
  • Movie: WHITE

Image: Amy Adams stars as a linguistics professor in Arrival. (Jan Thijs/Paramount Pictures)

The new film Arrival is based on a 1998 short story by Ted Chiang, a soft-spoken, 49-year-old technical writer based in Seattle. Every few years, Chiang comes out with a new short story that sweeps science fiction awards, including the Hugo and Nebula. But he’s only published 15 short stories since 1990.

“Fiction writing is very hard for me and I’m a very slow writer,” Chiang admits. “I don’t get that many ideas for stories. … And I like to take my time when I do get an idea for a story.”

‘Arrival’ Author’s Approach To Science Fiction? Slow, Steady And Successful

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You’ll feel so homesick that you’ll want to die, and there’s nothing you can do about it apart from endure it. But you will, and it won’t kill you. And one day, the sun will come out you might not even notice straight away-it’ll be that faint. And then you’ll catch yourself thinking about something or someone who has no connection with the past. Someone who’s only yours. And you’ll realize that this is where your life is.

NETFLIX DID THE THING

You know how every book lover watches the movie adaption of their favourite book series and feels dissatisfied? How what we really want is not a movie, but a miniseries of episodes, at least one per book, that follows the story to the letter and doesn’t leave out any of our favourite parts? Well, thank Neil Patrick Harris because NETFLIX DID THE THING.

A Series of Unfortunate Events -  Please please please go watch and share this because it is incredible and needs to be seen. It redeems everything that went wrong with that terrible Jim Carrey movie…

Anyway. From one excited book lover to another: