actors: david bowie

vimeo

On this day in music history: May 21, 1983 - “Let’s Dance” by David Bowie hits #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 1 week, also topping the Club Play chart for 2 weeks on April 30, 1983, and peaking at #14 on the R&B singles chart on May 28, 1983. Written by David Bowie, it is the second US chart topper for the British rock icon. Newly signed to a worldwide record deal with EMI Records in 1982 worth over $10 million, David Bowie collaborates with musician Nile Rodgers of Chic on his first album with the label. Before the recording sessions begin, Bowie plays Rodgers a number of new songs he has written including one titled “Let’s Dance”. Originally written on a 12-string acoustic guitar, Bowie’s original arrangement bares almost no resemblance to what it becomes. Rodgers takes the folk-rock acoustic based song, and transforms it into a funky, uptempo dance rock song. Recorded at The Power Station in New York City in December of 1982, “Let’s Dance” along with the rest of the accompanying album is recorded in under three weeks. “Dance” features most of the core rhythm section of Chic including Tony Thompson (drums), Rob Sabino (keyboards), Sammy Figueroa (percussion) and Rodgers himself (guitar) as well as Carmine Rojas (bass), and a then little known blues guitarist named Stevie Ray Vaughan providing the stinging lead guitar on the track. The title track from David Bowie’s fifteenth studio album, it is released in March of 1983 and is an immediate smash. Entering the Hot 100 at #59 on March 26, 1983, it  climbs to the top of the chart eight weeks later. The single also tops the chart in the UK, becoming his third chart topper in his home country. “Dance” not only become Bowie’s biggest single and album, but also introduces him to a new audience, winning him a new generation of fans. “Let’s Dance” is certified Gold in the US by the RIAA.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me - unnecessary and redundant

Somewhere around the 2nd season of ‘Twin Peaks’, I started getting very impatient with David Lynch’s vision and filmmaking talents. Regardless, I was curious to see what a big screen 'Twin Peaks’ without the restraints of the television censors would look like, so I rented this one when it came out on video. It had its moments here and there, but was just another retread of the whole 'Blue Velvet/Twin Peaks/Wild at Heart’ conceits that this director has been riding on for far too many years. For die hard fans only.

ADDENDUM: and now I see he’s relaunched the series on Showtime.. not particularly interested

2 stars out of 5

Released 1992, First Viewing July 1993