actor we are grateful for today

4

our cast and crew premier party was today! it was so fun and i got to meet a lot of the voice actors T_T we were so shocked when spidey showed up haha. words aren’t enough to describe how grateful and blessed i feel for the opportunities i’ve had this year! also robbie daymond said yaoi wowie

He’s… Mercurial. Shear talent. A genius. One of the leading actors in the world. An incredibly formidable presence. A Porsche 911.

Great people about Cumberbatch.

“Hands down, I believe that he’s the most versatile, surprising and charismatic actors of our time.” Christina Bianco, actress


“Benedict transforms, he doesn’t act. He becomes Turing.”, Morten Tyldum, director


"Even as a 13-year old, he was obviously an outstanding actor - a combination of intuition and intellect. It’s probably once in a lifetime that you find a boy actor as magnificent as this. I don’t think I had to speak or work with him in any way when I was directing him. I felt like I was working with a fellow professional rather than a schoolboy.” Mr. Tyrell, Cumberbatch’s acting teacher in Harrow


“Benedict is witty, mercurial… thoughtful and expert. He’s very intelligent but he doesn’t let it show by commenting on the character he is playing.” Richard Eyre, theater director


"He has a sensibility and an oddness to him… and a directness and a fantastic sense of humor (…) So I respect him on a pretty fundamental level (…) He’s an actor who has the ability to play in the outer field of basic acting work (…) He is a very generous, very sensitive, very thoughtful, focused, disciplined actor and, you know, when you work with somebody like that it’s just like playing… like Ronnie Scotts with B.B. King… it’s just a question of when or if… you know when someone’s got it and he’s got it.” Tom Hardy, actor


“He’s a fabulous actor and happens to have the zeitgeist. Sherlock has lifted him into a global star but he manages to combine stardom with utter brilliance which is really rare.” Hay Festival director Peter Florence


“Cumberbatch is a remarkable actor. He can quietly project the inner turmoil that more animated actors can only mimic.” Matthew Gilbert, TV critic


“Benedict Cumberbatch is shear talent. I mean he’s such a fantastically talented actor. He has a marvelous look of course, he has cheekbones you could shave Parmesan of and he’s just a magnificently talented actor. I’ve seen him do so many different things, with such style and he’s also an incredibly nice man and he deserves the enormous acclaim he receives around the world.” Stephen Fry, actor


“He is phenomenal. The amount of work that goes into his roles, he has a great work ethic and a genius mind, he is so inspiring. He really raised the bar for me and he had this integrity and genuineness. I feel really blessed to have worked with him. Plus he is so much fun, he’s become a good friend.” Adelaide Clemens, actress


“Everytime Benedict Cumberbatch opens his mouth it is positively electric… At the time I was getting really into Sherlock series one and I was just totally hypnotized by Benedict and I said to JJ ‘You gotta watch this guy, and one thing let to another and… Thank God! …. All credit goes to Benedict but I was smart enough to realize he is a genius.” Damon Lindelof, screenwriter


"I didn’t really know him as a stage actor. I knew what a fine screen actor he is. But there’s a physicality involved in the theatre. It’s not just about mannerisms or impersonation, which screen often is: it’s about sustaining a narrative with mind and body. When I saw him for Frankenstein, that was the only thing I wanted to know. Did he have that physical capacity? And of course he does. We met and I asked him to do a few things and he was extraordinary in the room. He’s as fit as a boxer, which you have to be for the stage. You have to have an internal fitness that allows you to carry the story so it never sags. He had this combination of the cerebral and the physical which you can see when you look back at his screen work – in Hawking, it’s there. Frankenstein was a great one for using it. That’s why he’s now what he is: one of the leading actors in the world.” Danny Boyle, director


“He’s a genius. There are certain actors who have the ability to take a line of dialogue and add a ring to it that you didn’t even know you put into the dialogue, into the line. And he’s one of those really brilliant actors. Just listening to him talk…you could enjoy him reading the phone book.(…) And he’s an incredibly formidable presence. He’s amazing.” Alex Kurtzman, screenwriter


“We found Benedict Cumberbatch fairly early. We needed a very good actor, someone young enough to be believable as an aristocratic, an almost slightly dislikeable character who is an adolescent in terms of his views of the world, his upbringing. But we also needed someone who could hold the screen for four and half hours, in every scene. We needed someone with experience who was not only a very good actor, but also with terrific comic timing. Benedict was the ideal answer to that.” David Attwood, director (To the ends of the earth)


“Everyone just looked at it and went “Oh. All right.” Meryl looked at me and gave me a big smile, which is Meryl’s way of saying “Well done”. It was not the best quality you’ve ever seen. And his face was very close. But he was wonderful. At first I didn’t realize that he was British because his southern Oklahoma accent was very good. There’s nothing guarded about him. It can be a little daunting because you have the clear impression at all times that he might be more intelligent than you are.” John Wells, director, about Cumberbatch’s iPhone auditioning for August: Osage County


“The difference between stars and just great actors is that stars can make parts into them, rather than themselves into parts; they make those people them. They never quite play it like you expect them to, so it becomes very much Benedict’s Sherlock. Look at how Sean Connery owned James Bond.” Steven Moffat, producer and writer


“He’s a stick shift; he’s changing up and changing down. He’s a Porsche 911.” Gary Oldman, actor


“I would like to officialy declare my love for Benedict Cumberbatch. Yes, that’s right. I’m in love with him.” Paul Feig, director


“He’s an immersive actor; he’s physical. You have to keep feeding him, trying to keep him stimulated. The engine has to be stoked all the time. The joke is that Hollywood thinks it’s investigating him right now to see what he’s made of. The truth is: He’s investigating them.” Danny Boyle, director


“Watching him physically train to play James (He dieted, ran the cliffs and swam in the cold sea), and also delve into the meaning of every line in rehearsals, and then plot the effect of his illness on his body and mind as it would be in each scene (shot in the wrong order), while all the while being a joy to be around was impressive to witness. To see it as one performance in the final cut was remarkable. - He is rare even amongst the acting breed. If the character description says handsome: he is. If it says Nasty: he is. Older: he is… Younger: he is. For this reason I just can’t wait to see what he will become.” Vaughan Sivell, producer and screen writer („Third Star“)


“Being on the set with him… I think everyone was bringing their absolute A-game. I think, frankly, in a way, [his] presence sort of elevated everything. Time and again, every scene, Benedict brought a surprising, unexpected, grounded, real and often terrifying aspect to the role. So we are incredibly grateful, all of us.” JJ Abrams, director


“Benedict Cumberbatch is one of my very favorite — excuse me, favourite — actors today, and he brought his brilliant mixture of confidence and strength to Khan in a way that, with all due respect, Montalban never did. Never once does Cumberbatch make the obvious choice, his performance is always subtle, always controlled, and when he finally goes full-Khan, scary as hell.” Will Wheaton, actor


“I think he’ll be one of the guys who lasts, that’s my take. It’s what George [Clooney] said to me ten years ago: If you can pull off ten years in this business, then you’ve done something, and we both kind of agreed that that was kind of the benchmark. And I think [Cumberbatch] is of the new crop.” Matt Damon, actor


“Benedict Cumberbatch is truly one of the greatest actors I’ve ever seen. And my favorite thing about him in this movie is that instead of his bad guy being adorned and wearing some crazy mask and costume and hair… he is just a simple man standing in a black shirt and black pants, just a common man… and his performance is so powerful in it’s simplicity… and that to me was an incredibly exciting thing to see: how little he needed to be that powerful.” JJ Abrams, director


“When he was at school, parents came to see him in plays their own children weren’t in - THAT is how good he is.” Tatler magazine


“Yes, Benedict has darkness. He has a light, brilliance, wit, sophistication, an imposing presence. He’s threatening; he’s physical. He’s also sympathetic. He does these things and makes it all look so damn easy. And the other actors … it was so funny. Every time we were doing a scene with Benedict, they were standing a little bit taller. He has a presence that is ridiculous and that voice, oh my God. There wasn’t a day working with Benedict that I didn’t think, this is insane. He elevated that moment. He made that thing that I thought was going to be really hard, authentic. He’s not like his character in any way, physically or emotionally, but he transformed himself physically. He was suddenly this wildly intimidating big guy. And he’s not. When you talk to him, he’s sort of slight. But in the movie, I spent a year editing him (Benedict’s footage). So it was like I got to see him every day. I got so used to him as that character. So when I saw him again recently, I thought, God, he’s so small, compared to how he is in the movie—he’s so epic. He is an utter chameleon who I think can do anything. He’s one of the best actors I’ve ever seen, let alone worked with. He was able to bring all of these incredible nuances and attitude to a role that in lesser hands would not have worked remotely that well.” JJ Abrams, director

I know that the filming is on for nearly 5 weeks now, but because of all the secrecy, we didn’t really get much so far and so I was excited, curious and all, but were not yet invested emotionally…Well, apparently it takes a couple of tweets and I’m a wreck. I don’t know how this show has such a power over my life but here we are. Gillian and David are all cute and snappy on social media and I’m just…suddenly all very emotional

  1. “So, who did you tick off to get stuck with this detail, Scully?” Happy 24th The Xfiles and thanks to all the fans!”
  2. 24 years today. Deja vu all over again. Thanks for repeatedly standing in the mud & the rain with me David Duchovny. 
  3. What’s a little mud and rain between partners.

The meaning of these words to them, to the fandom, to the show… I’m just emotional. Very emotional. They are still here, we are still here and our show is 24 years old today and it is coming back and 

I’M JUST SO VERY GRATEFUL. 

AND EMOTIONAL. 

This show gave me so much, and it just keeps giving and I love you, I love this fandom and I love love love all my friends who I met because of these two actors and their spooky show that premiered 24 years ago. 

Thanks to these two dorks, who captured my heart long time ago and changed my life forever ❤️❤️

If anyone ever complains about celebrity culture today, or despairs at how we’re all obsessed with actors, just hit them with some facts about acting in Imperial Rome:

  • Romans were obsessed with actors called pantomimes, masked, silent dancers who told stories through movement, not unlike our modern ballet dancers. You might not think that sounds exciting, but people went apeshit over them.
  • Seriously. People formed fan clubs for their favourite pantomimes. There is an inscription on a wall in Pompeii that gives endorsement to a political candidate from the Paridiani - the fan club of the pantomime Paris. The Paridiani were like the ancient equivalent of our Hiddlestoners and Cumberbitches.
  • These fan clubs could get really, really violent. They formed factions that would sit together at the theatre, and brawls often broke out as they fought over their favourites. (For some reason, riots hardly ever occurred at the amphitheatre, where people were getting murdered and torn apart by beasts, but at the theatre, where they were watching ballet dancers of all things, riots broke out all the time. Unbelievable.)
  • In 14 CE the populace rioted when one of the pantomime actors hired for the Augustalia refused to perform unless his pay was increased; the tribunes had to request an emergency meeting of the Senate so they could beg for more money before the people tore them apart. (Dio 56.47.2).
  • I cannot overstate how serious some of these theatre riots were. In Tiberius’ reign, it is believed that the rivalry between the pantomime fan clubs was the biggest threat to law and order in the city of Rome. They were so bad they required Senate intervention. Actors were targeted and punished for inflammatory behaviour, expenditure on entertainment was slashed, and the crowd was brought to heel by threats of exile for disorderly conduct. They were threatened with exile to stop the fighting. Suddenly the Cumberbitches don’t seem so bad.
  • Sometimes the rioting and the licentious behaviour of the actors meant that emperors would banish entire theatre troupes from the city of Rome, or from Italy itself, to keep order.
  • The rivalry between the actors themselves was no less intense. At one performance, the pantomime Pylades heckled his rival (and former pupil) Hylas, who was playing Blinded Oedipus, by calling out “You’re seeing!”
  • In another story, Pylades was playing Insane Hercules when the spectators heckled him for using inappropriate gestures. Pylades ripped off his mask and yelled, “Fools! I am playing a madman!” and tried to fight the audience. (Macrob Sat. 2.7.15-17.)
  • This same Pylades (he got around a lot) also shot actual poisoned arrows into the audience when he was playing Hercules.
  • Similarly, the tragic actor Aesopus (not a pantomime) is said to have gotten so into his role as the villain Atreus that he actually killed one of the servants crossing the stage.
  • Emperor Caligula was so passionate about acting that when a clap of thunder interrupted the performance of his favourite pantomimes, he tried to fight the sky. Seneca says: “Emperor Caligula was angry with heaven because it kept drowning out his pantomime actors… and when his revelry was terrified by lightning bolts (which must have fallen short of their mark!) he called on Jupiter for a fight to the death, exclaiming the Homeric verse: “Either lift me up, or I will lift you!” (De Ira, 1.20.8).
  • Many emperors and aristocrats had pantomimes as boyfriends (Maecenas, Caligula, Nero, etc.) Those chosen as imperial consorts were the best of the best; it would be like monarchs or presidents today taking Oscar winners as their lovers. Tom Hanks and Vladimir Putin, anyone?
  • Certain emperors became so caught up in the celebrity and entertainment-fuelled culture of Imperial Rome that they started acting themselves (something that was hugely degrading for any freeborn person, but especially an aristocrat or an emperor to do). Caligula was assassinated when he was on his way to the theatre, to prevent him from making his public debut as an actor. The famous Nero often performed and acted in tragedies, weirdly enough, while wearing masks fashioned after his own face, or (if he were playing a woman’s role) after the face of his dead wife Poppaea, whom he kicked to death. Nero was so into performing that he forced people to stay and watch him, and there are (probably exaggerated) stories of women giving birth and men shamming death so they could escape because no one was allowed to leave. (Could you even imagine Barack Obama starring in Broadway shows? Or Queen Elizabeth spending her nights playing Lady Macbeth at the Globe? Incredible.)
  • People complain today about girls being obsessed with actors, but it was the same in Rome. Juvenal says: “When nancy-boy Bathyllus is dancing the Leda pantomime, Tuccia wets herself. Apula whimpers, just as if she were in a man’s embrace, drawn-out and with sudden anguish.” (Satires, 6.63-5). I need a cold shower.
  • Another, humorous description of female infatuation with actors: “Some women burn for sordid folks and cannot rouse desire unless they see either slaves or servants in short tunics. The arena ignites some, or a mule-driver flooded with dust, or an actor made low by exhibiting himself on stage. My mistress is one of these; she jumps all the way from the orchestra and the first fourteen rows and with the plebs in the upper seats seeks what she loves. (Petronius, Satyricon, 126).
  • Empresses were not immune either, and pantomimes were involved in sex scandals at the highest level. The Empress Messalina forcibly seduced Mnester; the Empress Domitia Longina seduced Paris. (Both of the actors were executed.)
  • And that doesn’t even scratch the surface!

In conclusion, if you think our modern obsession with celebrities or the tendency for teenage girls to obsess over actors is in any way new, think again. This has been happening since the years BC. It happened in Greece, it happened in Rome, it happened in Shakespeare’s time. At every point in history, people have been obsessed with actors and celebrities. Just be grateful we don’t have to watch our world leaders acting anymore.

030517 : 1742

jongin,

you are right - we win some, we lose some. and i am very thankful for what im blessed with today and grateful for the nomination even though i am a young & new actor. i am still here but we have a short break now.

manager-hyung texted me that the van will pick me up right after the event ends and will drive me somewhere for “an exclusive dinner with a special someone at an undisclosed place” and that i should not change out of my tux.

hmmm. i wonder who is the lucky one who will have the pleasure of my dinner companionship tonight.

x
soo.

ps : please tell me that its you, else i will refuse the invite.

anonymous asked:

You can tell he does not use SM that often. His fans should give him a break and be grateful. This IG live was clearly just to give a short update on filming not a long session devoted to fans.

It was more a thank you for the follower count reaching 4M today. Yeah, a lot of actors don’t even use their IG to post pics let alone post IG stories and IG Live. But we are greedy; we always want more. Give us an arm and we will take the d….(pretty sure that is not how the saying goes. 🤔😜)

170122 churrokingtruck: #Support from #ChurroKing. On the set of #movie #RoomNo7 yesterday and today. We were requested by actor #DoKyungsoo. We’re very grateful that he never forgets to call us in each project. We are even fonder of him from greeting him at every one, from Cart til now. So much so that nowadays, whenever he or EXO appears on TV, we stop to keep watching.

Coffee, churros, and drinks are all we can do in gratitude, so we must provide Room No. 7′s crew with greater generosity before going. To Kyungsoo, recognized for so many projects that the title of actor now suits you, we give our thanks one more time. We won’t forget your constant brightness or humility. Room No. 7 and #Taejung have our sincere support.

Message: Fighting, Room No. 7! Please enjoy. - Taejung

source: churro king | translation: fydk

Today: BoJack Horseman table read. Get a load of Sporty Spice over there. When we record the show, all the actors record separately. So the table reads are my only chance to do some actual acting with Alison Brie. She is terrifically talented, equally adept at comedy and drama, and I am grateful for those few days out of the year that I get to sit across from her and do the occasional heavy emotional scene. It’s a privilege. 

 I just felt like saying that today.

REBLOG THIS FOR GMW FAN/CAST SUPPORT.

I came into this fandom to become a better script writer, and I’ll be honest with you, I have. But it is really hard to continue being a part of a fan group that literally is so driven and set on getting their way that when they don’t, they hastily decide to actively blur the lines of reality and fiction, just so they can find a real human being to direct their hate towards. Whether you are a 12, 24, or 48 year old watching Girl Meets World, becoming so enraged over the outcomes of a television show so that you harass, bully and hurt the actors that work so hard to give you the program you are so G*d damn addicted too is beyond unacceptable…its utterly disgusting. Some of us on here just want to enjoy the episodes, show respect and admiration for the creators and formulate our own theories, for our own various reasons, whether it be for fun, for educational purposes and so on. But when people send death threats, or show up in places, whether it be via social media or the actual set and spew their immature, offensive and absolutely horrific words at the cast, you make the rest of us ashamed to even be a part of this world

I’m not embarrassed to be part of the GMW fandom because I am nearly 30 years old. As a matter of fact, I’m pretty damn proud of that. I am embarrassed to be part of a fandom that would have the audacity to be so disrespectful, hateful and downright shameful towards a group of people who literally dedicate their entire lives to giving us something we enjoy so much. To think that this show had decided to display the kindness of an interactive episode, where the actors and writers sat with the audience, to both please and communicate with the fan base, just so that the people of that fanbase could turn around and completely abuse that privilege by spewing so much hate, enough hate that they actually succeeded in making these CHILDREN(the actors are CHILDREN) ashamed of themselves? It makes me sick to my stomach. It literally leaves me speechless. 

Did you all want a Season 4, 5, 6, maybe even 7? Honestly, I’d be surprised if we even got a 4th right now. If I were Michael Jacobs and I invited my fans to interview my actors and all those fans did was make those actors cry? Sorry, I’d be out. Actors can, in situations of distress, break their contracts (like Demi Lovato). I wouldn’t be shocked if that’s what happens after today. 

To the writers, directors, producers, creators, crew and especially the young cast that is overflowing with immense talent and charisma- I personally apologize to you. I am sorry for anything that has made your fans, people you are supposed to be grateful for having, turn into something you are repelled by, saddened by, angered by and most of all, scared of

I hope if you are reading this, you reblog this. I hope you tell everyone in this fandom you have ever spoken to, to reblog it too. I know that the actors, writers and crew will probably never see it, I know the damage has been done. But out of respect for ourselves, we have to promote civility, compassion and love. The world is filled with too much hate these days. Lets do our part in making the change. Lets remind this wonderful show of the amazing, supportive, positive and thankful fanbase they truly have. 

A Q&A With Godzilla: Interviews with the Original Cast

Akira Takarada and Haruo Nakajima may not be recognizable names in North America. However, everybody knows their characters—the hero and villain of the original 1954 movie Godzilla, known as Gojira in Japan.

Just in time for Anime Boston’s kaiju vs. mecha theme, the two veteran actors sat down to revisit their old monster movie and answer audience questions. We’ve collected some of our favorite responses from each of them.

How much does the fan community mean to you guys?

Nakajima: I am really really grateful that you are all here, clearly because I was so good at playing Godzilla. Thank you.

Gojira has an important message about the danger of nuclear power and weapons. Do you feel this message still applies today?

Nakajima: Sixty-one years ago, we created Gojira to spread the anti-atomic weapon message and to eliminate all atomic bombs from earth. It was felt that Japan in particular, having experienced two nuclear incidents, was suited to spreading this message. Of course other accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and recently Fukushima show that Gojira’s message is still relevant today.

The character of Gojira has been in over 21 films as both a superhero and a destructive force. if you had to choose one favorite, which would it be?

Takarada: If i really had to choose, I would choose Gojira the protector. However it is important to think of Gojira as not just a destroyer. He is also a victim of nuclear radiation. He is a force to be sympathetic with not hated or reviled.

Even though the concept of kajiu is very Japanese in both theme and context, why do you feel it has such a huge worldwide following?

Nakajima: One of the main reasons it had a huge worldwide appeal is because Gojira is trying to protect himself and his home, and everyone can understand that!

Takarada: Gojira is not one dimensional. He has more than one emotion. Sometimes he looks down on people with pity. He has human properties.

Godzilla is not produced using computer generated animation. Do you have any thoughts or feelings about that?“

Nakajima: A lot of preparation went into creating Gojira, from working on movement to looking at animals to make him move correctly. I feel that [CGI] is missing that sense of heart and sense of vulnerability and the feeling of man vs. nature. I think the original is the best! It’s more than a suit. I am Gojira.

—John, AB Staff Blogger

170123 @churrokingtruck: We received a lot of support and attention yesterday for actor #DoKyungsoo’s event for Room No. 7. I am sorry I cannot reply to each and every comment, but you have my thanks. I’m thinking of yesterday, on set. Actor Do told us with a bright smile that he’s always grateful to us. When I said I’m the one who should be, and he said he calls because our food is too good.. to take care of him tomorrow too.. I felt very good and thankful.

We were reserved for two sites on two days, so we are here to provide #support today too. We’re on the set of #movie #WithTheGods, this time arranged by #PrivateWon. Although I know Kyungsoo is done with all his parts, he still makes sure to take care like this. He’s really quite delicate and warm. As always, his message of encouragement was concise, and the design simple like it. But his warm heart is quite clear in the short message. Thank you once again. Room No. 7′s Taejung and With the Gods’ Private Won, you have my sincere support. I’ll be running right over at release. 

Message: Fighting, With the Gods! Please enjoy. - Private Won

source: churro king | translation: fydk

In articles, blog posts and Facebook threads, scholars have debated whether “Hamilton” over-glorifies the man, inflating his opposition to slavery while glossing over less attractive aspects of his politics, which were not necessarily as in tune with contemporary progressive values as audiences leaving the theater might assume.


The conversation has yet to erupt into a full-fledged historians’ rap battle. But some scholars are wondering if one is due to start.


“The show, for all its redemptive and smart aspects, is part of this ‘Founders Chic’ phenomenon,” said David Waldstreicher, a historian at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York who last September sounded an early note of skepticism on The Junto, a group blog about early American history.


Amid all the enthusiasm for “Hamilton” the musical, he added, Hamilton the man “has gotten a free pass.”


Annette Gordon-Reed, a professor of history and law at Harvard and the Pulitzer-Prize-winning author of “The Hemingses of Monticello,” put it more bluntly.


“One of the most interesting things about the ‘Hamilton’ phenomenon,” she wrote last week on the blog of the National Council on Public History, “is just how little serious criticism the play has received.”


Ms. Gordon-Reed was responding to a critical essay by Lyra D. Monteiro, in the journal The Public Historian, arguing that the show’s multiethnic casting obscures the almost complete lack of identifiable African-American characters, making the country’s founding seem like an all-white affair.


“It’s an amazing piece of theater, but it concerns me that people are seeing it as a piece of history,” Ms. Monteiro, an assistant professor of history at Rutgers University, Newark, said in an interview.


The founders, she added, “really didn’t want to create the country we actually live in today.”


Ms. Gordon-Reed — who is credited with breaking down the resistance among historians to the claim that Thomas Jefferson had a sexual relationship with Sally Hemings — wrote in her response that she shared some of Ms. Monteiro’s qualms, even as she loved the musical and listened to the cast album every day.


“Imagine ‘Hamilton’ with white actors,” she wrote. “Would the rosy view of the founding era grate?”


Historians are generally not reluctant to call out the supposed sins of popularizers. When Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” arrived in 2012, a number of prominent scholars blasted it for promoting a “great man” view of history and neglecting the role African-Americans played in their own emancipation.


While the most recent critiques of “Hamilton” have focused on race, some scholars have also noted that it’s an odd moment for the public to embrace an unabashed elitist who liked big banks, mistrusted the masses and at one point called for a monarchal presidency and a Senate that served for life.


Alexander Hamilton “was more a man for the 1 percent than the 99 percent,” said Sean Wilentz, a professor at Princeton and the author of “The Politicians and the Egalitarians,” to be published in May.


[…]


R.B. Bernstein, a historian at City College of New York who has written extensively about Jefferson, credited “Hamilton” with keeping the subject of slavery simmering underneath its jam-packed story. But race and slavery, he added, were not the only important, or timely, aspects of the show.


“It’s about how hard it is to do politics, about how people of fundamentally clashing political views tried to work together to create a shared constitutional enterprise,” he said. “And right now, that’s a message we really need.”

Oscars 2014: Jared Leto reacts -- 'Yesterday I was doing jury duty, today I got an Academy Award nomination'

Jared Leto is having an amazing morning — but when he first woke up he thought maybe an Oscar nomination wasn’t going to happen. “I woke up about an hour ago [5:37 am] and thought, ‘Oh I must not have gotten the nomination because no one woke me up yet. I was having a philosophical debate in my head about gratitude versus disappointment so you know I just won the Golden Globe and I’ve won 25 or so awards this season for the film already so there’s a lot to be grateful for. The nomination obviously is a huge one and it’s a great thing to get it.”

But a nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his work in Dallas Buyers Club isn’t the only thing on Leto’s mind this morning. He’s also got jury duty to contend with. (Oscar nominees! They’re just like us!) “It’s great: yesterday I was doing jury duty, today I got an Academy Award nomination…. only in America,” Leto said. “We probably shouldn’t talk about the case anymore (laughs).”

Leto, who won a Golden Globe for his performance last Sunday, hasn’t gotten to thinking about what he might say if he wins the Oscar. Reminiscing about his Globes win, Leto shared:  “It’s a big one. There’s a lot of buzz happening in that room and you’re so blown away to get that kind of acknowledgement. And it’s not about the award, or having something to put on your mantle, it’s not about the ego. You really have the chance to share something with your family. My brother was there so when I won it kind of felt like we won together. It was really nice. But I think everybody knows how grateful I am and now with 6 nominations [for the film] everybody has a lot to be grateful for.”

For now, “I’m going to go back to bed and then I’m going to wake up and eat vegan pancakes and contemplate how wonderful life can be.”

6

He’s… Mercurial. Shear talent. A genius. One of the leading actors in the world. An incredibly formidable presence. A Porsche 911.

I think its time to repost and update one of my most reblogged posts of all times. Because I see all this hate for Benedict on Tumblr these days, mostly from people who havent even seen him in anything, and I want to inform them and remind his tumblr fans why we are fans.

He’s one of the most admired actors in the world, first and foremost among his peers and collegues. I know about two guys who went to acting school because of him,  because of the video of him doing motion capture for Smaug. Do yourself a favour and watch that Video, see what a true genius he is and why he gets big roles: https://youtu.be/FHuXSZv6Tqs.

He’s an inspration for artists all over the globe and he deserves more than getting irrational hate from People who know nothing about him.

So, here my post:

Great people about Cumberbatch.

“As well as Olivier, acting giants Peter O’Toole and Richard Burton drew audiences by their sheer strength of character. Today Benedict Cumberbatch is doing the same.”
Joanna Read, Principal of LAMDA acting school

“Hands down, I believe that he’s the most versatile, surprising and charismatic actors of our time.”
Christina Bianco, actress

“Benedict transforms, he doesn’t act. He becomes Turing.”
Morten Tyldum, director

“There’s a dignity about him, a correctness.”
Steve McQueen, director

“After [Benedict] left, [executive producer] Stephen Broussard and I looked at each other and said, ‘I think Doctor Strange was just here. (Strange) gets into a horrible car accident and his hands, the tools by which he can do amazing surgeries, are mangled and destroyed. That starts his downward path, and that’s why Benedict is such a great choice - you can go to the highest heights and lowest lows with him and he won’t lose you.”
Kevin Feige, Marvel director

“Even as a 13-year old, he was obviously an outstanding actor - a combination of intuition and intellect. It’s probably once in a lifetime that you find a boy actor as magnificent as this. I don’t think I had to speak or work with him in any way when I was directing him. I felt like I was working with a fellow professional rather than a schoolboy.”
Mr. Tyrell, Cumberbatch’s acting teacher in Harrow

“Benedict Cumberbatch… is amazing. Amazing. Beautiful man, beautiful heart, soul… and how giving he is as an actor…”
Johnny Depp, actor

"You want an actor who can bring a lot of intelligence, a lot of character to it. It’s important with the dragon that he’s smarter than Bilbo.You wanted a sense that Bilbo was up against a very formidable foe. So literally, we wanted somebody scary. He’s like the Hannibal Lecter of the dragon world. And Benedict has just got such a great voice and he’s got such a great, sharp mind that we was able to contribute a huge amount to the role.”
Peter Jackson, director

Benedict is witty, mercurial… thoughtful and expert. He’s very intelligent but he doesn’t let it show by commenting on the character he is playing.”
Richard Eyre, theater director

“He has a sensibility and an oddness to him… and a directness and a fantastic sense of humor (…) So I respect him on a pretty fundamental level (…) He’s an actor who has the ability to play in the outer field of basic acting work (…) He is a very generous, very sensitive, very thoughtful, focused, disciplined actor and, you know, when you work with somebody like that it’s just like playing… like Ronnie Scotts with B.B. King… it’s just a question of when or if… you know when someone’s got it and he’s got it.”
Tom Hardy, actor

“He’s a fabulous actor and happens to have the zeitgeist. Sherlock has lifted him into a global star but he manages to combine stardom with utter brilliance which is really rare.”
Hay Festival director Peter Florence

“Cumberbatch is a remarkable actor. He can quietly project the inner turmoil that more animated actors can only mimic.”
Matthew Gilbert, TV critic

“Benedict Cumberbatch is shear talent. I mean he’s such a fantastically talented actor. He has a marvelous look of course, he has cheekbones you could shave Parmesan of and he’s just a magnificently talented actor. I’ve seen him do so many different things, with such style and he’s also an incredibly nice man and he deserves the enormous acclaim he receives around the world.”
Stephen Fry, actor

“He is phenomenal. The amount of work that goes into his roles, he has a great work ethic and a genius mind, he is so inspiring. He really raised the bar for me and he had this integrity and genuineness. I feel really blessed to have worked with him.”
Adelaide Clemens, actress

“Everytime Benedict Cumberbatch opens his mouth it is positively electric… At the time I was getting really into Sherlock series one and I was just totally hypnotized by Benedict and I said to JJ ‘You gotta watch this guy, and one thing let to another and… Thank God! …. All credit goes to Benedict but I was smart enough to realize he is a genius.”
Damon Lindelof, screenwriter

"I didn’t really know him as a stage actor. I knew what a fine screen actor he is. But there’s a physicality involved in the theatre. It’s not just about mannerisms or impersonation, which screen often is: it’s about sustaining a narrative with mind and body. When I saw him for Frankenstein, that was the only thing I wanted to know. Did he have that physical capacity? And of course he does. We met and I asked him to do a few things and he was extraordinary in the room. He’s as fit as a boxer, which you have to be for the stage. You have to have an internal fitness that allows you to carry the story so it never sags. He had this combination of the cerebral and the physical which you can see when you look back at his screen work – in Hawking, it’s there. Frankenstein was a great one for using it. That’s why he’s now what he is: one of the leading actors in the world.”
Danny Boyle, director

“He’s a genius. There are certain actors who have the ability to take a line of dialogue and add a ring to it that you didn’t even know you put into the dialogue, into the line. And he’s one of those really brilliant actors. Just listening to him talk…you could enjoy him reading the phone book.(…) And he’s an incredibly formidable presence. He’s amazing.”
Alex Kurtzman, screenwriter

“We found Benedict Cumberbatch fairly early. We needed a very good actor, someone young enough to be believable as an aristocratic, an almost slightly dislikeable character who is an adolescent in terms of his views of the world, his upbringing. But we also needed someone who could hold the screen for four and half hours, in every scene. We needed someone with experience who was not only a very good actor, but also with terrific comic timing. Benedict was the ideal answer to that.”
David Attwood, director (To the ends of the earth)

“Everyone just looked at it and went “Oh. All right.” Meryl looked at me and gave me a big smile, which is Meryl’s way of saying “Well done”. It was not the best quality you’ve ever seen. And his face was very close. But he was wonderful. At first I didn’t realize that he was British because his southern Oklahoma accent was very good. There’s nothing guarded about him. It can be a little daunting because you have the clear impression at all times that he might be more intelligent than you are.”
John Wells, director, about Cumberbatch’s iPhone auditioning for August: Osage County

“The difference between stars and just great actors is that stars can make parts into them, rather than themselves into parts; they make those people them. They never quite play it like you expect them to, so it becomes very much Benedict’s Sherlock. Look at how Sean Connery owned James Bond.”
Steven Moffat, producer and writer

“He’s a stick shift; he’s changing up and changing down. He’s a Porsche 911.” Gary Oldman, actor

“I would like to officialy declare my love for Benedict Cumberbatch. Yes, that’s right. I’m in love with him.”
Paul Feig, director

“He’s an immersive actor; he’s physical. You have to keep feeding him, trying to keep him stimulated. The engine has to be stoked all the time. The joke is that Hollywood thinks it’s investigating him right now to see what he’s made of. The truth is: He’s investigating them.”
Danny Boyle, director

“Watching him physically train to play James (He dieted, ran the cliffs and swam in the cold sea), and also delve into the meaning of every line in rehearsals, and then plot the effect of his illness on his body and mind as it would be in each scene (shot in the wrong order), while all the while being a joy to be around was impressive to witness. To see it as one performance in the final cut was remarkable. - He is rare even amongst the acting breed. If the character description says handsome: he is. If it says Nasty: he is. Older: he is… Younger: he is. For this reason I just can’t wait to see what he will become.”
Vaughan Sivell, producer and screen writer („Third Star“)

“Being on the set with him… I think everyone was bringing their absolute A-game. I think, frankly, in a way, [his] presence sort of elevated everything. Time and again, every scene, Benedict brought a surprising, unexpected, grounded, real and often terrifying aspect to the role. So we are incredibly grateful, all of us.”
JJ Abrams, director

“Benedict Cumberbatch is one of my very favorite — excuse me, favourite — actors today, and he brought his brilliant mixture of confidence and strength to Khan in a way that, with all due respect, Montalban never did. Never once does Cumberbatch make the obvious choice, his performance is always subtle, always controlled, and when he finally goes full-Khan, scary as hell.”
Will Wheaton, actor

“I think he’ll be one of the guys who lasts, that’s my take. It’s what George [Clooney] said to me ten years ago: If you can pull off ten years in this business, then you’ve done something, and we both kind of agreed that that was kind of the benchmark. And I think [Cumberbatch] is of the new crop.”
Matt Damon, actor

“Benedict Cumberbatch is truly one of the greatest actors I’ve ever seen. And my favorite thing about him in this movie is that instead of his bad guy being adorned and wearing some crazy mask and costume and hair… he is just a simple man standing in a black shirt and black pants, just a common man… and his performance is so powerful in it’s simplicity… and that to me was an incredibly exciting thing to see: how little he needed to be that powerful.”
JJ Abrams, director

“When he was at school, parents came to see him in plays their own children weren’t in - THAT is how good he is.”
Tatler magazine

“Yes, Benedict has darkness. He has a light, brilliance, wit, sophistication, an imposing presence. He’s threatening; he’s physical. He’s also sympathetic. He does these things and makes it all look so damn easy. And the other actors … it was so funny. Every time we were doing a scene with Benedict, they were standing a little bit taller. He has a presence that is ridiculous and that voice, oh my God. There wasn’t a day working with Benedict that I didn’t think, this is insane. He elevated that moment. He made that thing that I thought was going to be really hard, authentic. He’s not like his character in any way, physically or emotionally, but he transformed himself physically. He was suddenly this wildly intimidating big guy. And he’s not. When you talk to him, he’s sort of slight. But in the movie, I spent a year editing him (Benedict’s footage). So it was like I got to see him every day. I got so used to him as that character. So when I saw him again recently, I thought, God, he’s so small, compared to how he is in the movie—he’s so epic. He is an utter chameleon who I think can do anything. He’s one of the best actors I’ve ever seen, let alone worked with. He was able to bring all of these incredible nuances and attitude to a role that in lesser hands would not have worked remotely that well.”
JJ Abrams, director

jenmorrisonlive Day 17. Deep in thought. We hit the champaign roll today. I am so grateful to every single crew member, actor, and producer. Everyone is so inspiring and talented. They all push me to be my best and they all bring so much hustle and talent in every moment of every day. I feel so so grateful for this life experience. #SUNDOGS
photo by @eduardofierrosvc

June 25, 2016 [x]

I think what I loved most about this episode is the sense of content acceptance it gave off. The writers and actors basically told us that the story is as much ours as it’s theirs. They gave us their blessings to make our own versions and write on and create as much as we want, because having the original version doesn’t cancel ours in the slightest, and the characters we love so much -as we saw today- don’t mind our creations after all. In fact Sam ships it, and Dean got flustered by some of it. We have acceptance to carry on doing what we do, and even a sense of gratefulness for it. And for some reason (as a shipper, a fan, and a fanfic writer) that means the world to me.

Here we go. It’s your birthday again. It’s been nearly 2 years since you left us. I still can’t believe that you’re gone. What can I say? I hope you’re happy there & I hope you see how much we miss you. The pain never stopped. I still think about you everyday. I miss your beautiful voice, your gorgeous smile, I miss Finn, I miss you. You will always stay in my heart & my mind. I will always think of you as a wonderful, funny & talented person  with big heart. You changed so many lives. You made so many people happy. And we’re all grateful for that. You will always be inspiration to me. We will never forget you Cory! You live in our hearts today & forever. You are my hero & you will always be that. I love you no matter what. Rest in peace angel. Never forgotten.