action civics

100 Acts of Resistance

The first 100 days of Trump regime is critical and where he has the best chances to push for his agenda in the next four years. In townhalls I’ve attended and questions i see people always ask online is wanting specific directions and what concrete things can we do to resist Trump and GOP.

Below are 100 basic action items you can take to resist the Trump and GOP agenda in his first 100 days and in the next four years. These generic action items can be applied to take action on any current issue or on any specific issue you’ve been passionate about for a long time. 

While it’s encouraged to do as many of these as you can, especially in Trump’s first 100 days, the point of the list is to give you different options on actions you can take that will fit within your time and abilities, and it is by no means exhaustive. The goal is to motivate you to take an action no matter how small, and hopefully provide a jumpstart to take bolder actions in resisting fascism: 

  1. Follow all your representatives on social media, esp on Twitter and Facebook
  2. Save all the numbers of your elected officials on your phone & designate a schedule within your day or week to call them
  3. Visit your elected officials’ website, subscribe to their newsletter/events calendar/follow their bills
  4. Call your Senator #1
  5. Call your Senator #2
  6. Call the Senate Leader (Mitch McConnell)
  7. Call your Congressperson
  8. Call the House Speaker (Paul Ryan)
  9. Call the VP office (Mike Pence)
  10. Call the White House Call Donald Trump Hotels
  11. Call your Governor
  12. Call your Mayor/County Executive
  13. Call your City/County Council Member
  14. Call your State Senator
  15. Call your State Representative
  16. Write* your Senator #1
  17. Write* your Senator #2
  18. Write* your Congressperson
  19. Write* your Governor
  20. Write* your Mayor/County Executive
  21. Write* your City/County Council Member
  22. Write* your State Senator
  23. Write* your State Representative
  24. Write the House Speaker
  25. Write the Senate Leader
  26. Write the VP office
  27. Write the White House
  28. After initial letter or call, follow up with your elected officials
  29. Write letters to editors of local newspapers
  30. Attend a protest in your area
  31. Plan/organize a protest in your area
  32. Attend a townhall (with your representatives)
  33. Attend a city/county council meeting
  34. Attend a legislative hearing
  35. Attend a school board meeting
  36. Attend your rep’s public event
  37. Attend a neighborhood community meeting (esp with law enforcement)
  38. Attend a community event (with community leaders & grassroots orgs)
  39. Participate in a community conference call/grassroots webinar
  40. Plan/Host a community event
  41. Sign a petition
  42. Get at least five other people to sign a petition
  43. Start a petition on a local issue
  44. Invite a friend to participate in a protest
  45. Invite a friend to attend a townhall
  46. Invite a friend to a community event
  47. Invite a friend to community call/grassroots webinar
  48. Get a friend to write a letter to the editor of a local paper
  49. Get at least one friend or family member to call/write their elected official, esp those with GOP reps
  50. Schedule a meeting with one of your elected officials
  51. Read and Share news articles (help spread facts, not propaganda news!)
  52. Follow reputable journalists on social media, esp on Twitter & FB
  53. Follow local, regional and national newspapers on social media
  54. Follow government agencies on social media
  55. Follow activists on social media
  56. Follow civil rights organizations on social media
  57. Subscribe to text alerts and newsletters from civil rights organizations
  58. Participate in an online campaign to spread public awareness or get attention of Congress
  59. Volunteer for local affiliates of nationwide civil rights organizations
  60. Volunteer for local democratic party
  61. Volunteer for a local progressive organization
  62. Volunteer in a political campaign
  63. Volunteer for a local community service project (serve.gov)
  64. Volunteer for a civil rights organization (local & national)
  65. Volunteer for an immigrant and refugee organization (local & international)
  66. Volunteer for an LGBT rights organization (local & national)
  67. Volunteer for reproductive rights organization (local & national)
  68. Volunteer for a healthcare/public health organization (local & national)
  69. Volunteer for an anti-poverty/hunger organization (domestic or international)
  70. Volunteer for an anti-homeless organization (local & national)
  71. Volunteer for an anti-trafficking/anti-slavery organization (domestic & int’l)
  72. Volunteer for an humanitarian organization (domestic or international)
  73. Volunteer for a voting rights organization (local & national)
  74. Volunteer for a veterans organization (local & national)
  75. Volunteer for a disabilities organization (local & national)
  76. Volunteer for a climate change organization (domestic & international)
  77. Volunteer for a non-partisan organization (local or international)
  78. Volunteer for a non-governmental organization of your choosing
  79. Donate to a civil rights organization (local & national)
  80. Donate to an immigrant and refugee organization (local & international)
  81. Donate to an LGBT rights organization (local & national)
  82. Donate to a reproductive rights organization (local & national)
  83. Donate to a healthcare/public health organization (local & national)
  84. Donate to an anti-poverty/hunger organization (domestic or international)
  85. Donate to an anti-homelessness organization (local & national)
  86. Donate to an anti-trafficking/anti-slavery organization (domestic & int’l)
  87. Donate to an humanitarian organization (domestic or international)
  88. Donate to a voting rights organization (local & national)
  89. Donate to a veterans organization (local & national)
  90. Donate to a disabilities organization (local & national)
  91. Donate to a climate change organization (domestic & international)
  92. Donate to a non-partisan organization (local or international)
  93. Donate to a non-governmental organization of your choosing
  94. Donate to a local democratic party
  95. Donate to a political campaign
  96. Register to Vote
  97. Get at least one friend or family member to register to vote
  98. Vote on municipal, state and national elections
  99. Get at least one friend or family member to vote
  100. Run for office

*letters, postcards, fax, email, open letters on newspapers

”There’s no question that civic engagement is a way to stand firm against the degradation of a representative system of government. At the same time, recasting the fundamental building blocks of civic engagement not as essential tools of public engagement available to all citizens in all times, but as acts of resistance we deploy only against extraordinary threats to our system, is a quick way to get those acts tagged as radical rather than normal.

We should be wary of adopting a renamed version of civic engagement that seems mostly intended to make ourselves feel good and brave about doing things we should have been doing in the first place. Meeting our basic obligations as citizens is not the same thing as revolutionary action.”

Calling basic civics ‘resistance’ will only make it harder to stand up to Trump

4

On this date in U.S. Army SF history……09-July 1963: U.S. Army Green Berets began organizing and training tribesman in the Central Highlands of Vietnam into the Civilian Irregular Defense Group.

The CIDG program was devised by the CIA to counter expanding Viet Cong influence in South Vietnam’s Central Highlands. Beginning in the village of Buon Enao, small A Teams from the U.S. Army Special Forces (Green Berets) moved into villages and set up Area Development Centers. Focusing on local defense and civic action, the Special Forces teams did the majority of the training. Villagers were trained and armed for village defense for two weeks, while localized Strike Forces would receive better training and weapons and served as a quick reaction force to react to Viet Cong attacks. The vast majority of the CIDG camps were initially manned by inhabitants of ethnic minority regions in the country (especially Montagnard), who disliked both the North and South Vietnamese and therefore quickly took to the American advisers. The program was widely successful, as once one village was pacified, it served as a training camp for other local villages.

By late 1963, the military felt that the program was a great success, but also that the CIDG units and Special Forces units were not being employed properly, and ordered Operation Switchback, which transferred control of the CIDG program from the CIA over to Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. The CIDG Program was rapidly expanded, as the entire 5th Special Forces Group, U.S. Army Special Forces, moved into Vietnam, and the CIDG units stopped focusing on village defense and instead took part in more conventional operations, most notably border surveillance. Most of these were converted to Vietnam Army Ranger units in 1970.