ace hotel london shoreditch

Shoreditch, London

Well, the cat’s out of the bag: we’ve got a couple of new neighbors joining us on High Street. By the end of July, Soho’s beloved Sister Ray Records and our dear friends at Opening Ceremony will have a pair of new Shoreditch storefronts — right here at Ace Hotel. 

Sister Ray’s new vinyl-only outpost opens on July 29, and promises to stock stacks of new and used wax across all genres. They’ll be throwing an opening bash once the ribbon’s cut — we’ll let you know once it shapes up. Meanwhile O.C.’s new, Max Lamb-designed pop-up is set to take over 106 High Street — keeping us company with both men’s and women’s wares.

Shoreditch, London

It’s been almost four decades since NASA launched their twin Voyager probes — now the farthest manmade objects from Earth, at roughly 12 billion miles from our humble home. The vessels are famously home to a pair of Golden Records — one-sided LPs compiled with the help of Carl Sagan and others as audio time capsules of the human experience — each tossed like beautiful bottled messages into the black sea of space. 

Both probes are also home to instruments that transmit electromagnetic signals back to Earth — recording the unique “sounds” emitted from the celestial bodies they pass on their way through the void. Portland’s Lefse Records have tapped the well of NASA’s recordings, and invited folks like Spiritualized, Beach House and The Antlers to incorporate the otherworldly sounds into a set of new recordings. 

On April 15 at 7:30pm, our friends at creative science collective SUPER/COLLIDER present a listening party for THE SPACE PROJECT— the 7" box set coming out on Record Store Day that compiles the cosmic results. The listening party is preceded by a roundtable with The Quietus’ Luke Turner, space scientist Professor Andrew Coates, astronomer Dr. Radmila Topolovic and astrostatistician Dr. Daniel Mortlock, discussing the Voyager missions and the lasting effects they’ve had on our relationship with the stars.

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A Tale of Two Cities: Ace Hotel London Shoreditch & Shangri-La Hotel, at The Shard, London

Never mind the best of times and the worst of times—there is no “worst” in the land of plush properties. It’s not quite a tale of two cities, either—more like two hotels: vastly different slices of London, where sundry neighborhoods are increasingly making Europe’s second-largest city feel like many cities in one. Check out these two hotels here.

Shoreditch, London

From the vast, incomprehensible cartography of the globe to the quiet cognitive maps of the everyday, we map for comfort — to afford ourselves the illusion of place. They’re the red dots we use to assure ourselves that “You Are Here” — and that everything else is relative and predictable. 

With Where You Are (a must-see website), the pictorially preoccupied storytellers at London publishing house Visual Editions take on the idea of mapping from the perspective of 16 different writers, artists and thinkers — in fiction and non-fiction writing plus a variety of visuals — to create “a book of maps that will leave you feeling completely lost.” Featuring contributions from Chloe Aridjis, Alain de Botton, Joe Dunthorne, Leanne Shapton, Geoff Dyer, Olafur Eliasson, Sheila Heti + Ted Mineo, Tao Lin and a host of others, the book is a beautiful, mixed-up marvel of a thing.

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The lobby gallery at Ace Hotel London Shoreditch opens up the atlas of Where Are You for the month of April, putting the collection’s rich visual components on display twenty-four hours a day. The opening reception is coming up on Wednesday April 2 at 6pm, complete with cocktails, conversation and a few readings.

Shoreditch, London

“As an admirer of people who make things but not being an artist myself, being able to see our products used by artists, architects, illustrators, designers and getting their feedback is very rewarding and a privilege.”

In the summer of 2012, our friend Julia opened Choosing Keeping, a specialty shop with all corners dedicated to the desk environment — regardless of whether yours is a place of work or creative escape.

Located on iconic Columbia Road — home of the Sunday Flower Market — Choosing Keeping offers a selection of beautifully-made utility objects, plus carefully-curated books and prints to stimulate the discerning synapses. 

Julia’s a passionate, adorable shopkeep — the kind that has us making increasingly regular excuses to stop in. We’re going to need to find some new pen pals.

Choosing Keeping
128 Columbia Road
London E2 7RG

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Shoreditch, London

Nights stay younger longer in Shoreditch lately. We got tired of stepping out for a spot of food just as restaurant staff were stripping back the cutlery, so Hoi Polloi’s been celebrating us night creatures with raucous Midnight Suppers.

Thursday nights are set aside for our oft-unruly special guest Maitre D’s, with Fridays devoted to Hoi Polloi’s musical director — their radiant, Vangelian angel Xavior — who posts up at the piano each week with a new weapon in his arsenal of synthesizers. This round he’ll be exploring the outer cosmos with his Arturia Laboratory. If you can’t make it on Friday, don’t fret: Hoi Polloi will be happy to entertain you late, seven days a week.

London, UK

Throughout the ‘90s and early '00s, American experimental music treasure William Basinski operated a now-mythical avant-garde incubator beside the East River in North Williamsburg — a studio and performance space that played early host to Diamanda Galás, Antony and countless others. Arcadia closed its doors for good in 2008, but London’s Art Assembly brought Basinski out to co-curate a series of Arcadia-inspired music and live art events in London — including a host of pretty spectacular shows at Ace London.

The mini-fest kicked off tonight and continues through March 20. We’ll be hosting several shows Downstairs — Basinski and James Elaine’s Melancholia film shorts, Julia KentPaul Prudence and more — plus Janek Schaefer's sound installation Lay-by-Lullaby will be posted up in the lobby throughout. More details are available at our calendar.

London, UK

Last month we reported on London-based architectural photographer Andrew Meredith’s adventures documenting the eerie vacancy of Hashima Island. Some of the captivating results of Andrew’s trip hang this month in the gallery at Ace London.

Opening reception is today, March 6, 7-9pm.

London, UK

A few weeks ago, New York based humanist photographer and filmmaker Cheryl Dunn came to London to present her latest documentary, Everybody Street — a homage to the lives and works of iconic street-photographers in NYC, from Bruce Davidson to Joel Meyerowitz, to Jill Freedman, to only name a few. We asked Cheryl to answer five questions about herself by picking images.

How do you see yourself?

I definitely see myself in motion, sort of weaving through crowds. I have a dance background and have a strong sense of physicality and this is always on my mind when I work and in life. I am very conscious of how I move through an environment and how I physically handle my tools that I use to shoot. With documentary practices, my aim is to be fluid and make things appear effortless as to not draw attention to myself so my subjects stay as natural as possible. A really unrealistic fantasy dream would be to be a Pina Bausch dancer. So here is a shot of one of her dancers that I took in Wuppertal, Germany. (above)

How do you see the others around you?

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In a wider sense sometimes I see people as objects in a composition. And sometimes I put on headphones and go out and shoot street pictures and really study people and try to guess what they are thinking and get in their heads.

What was the last place you dreamt about?

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It was definitely a fantasy world. Sexy with good music…

What you feel when you hear your favorite song/band?

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Ha that dream… Sometimes I feel transported to a location and sometimes I think of a person I love or a visualization of the first time I heard that tune.

A secret power you would like to have?

              

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To time travel to the past. I’m a little afraid of the future…

All photos by Cheryl Dunn.

In the trestles beneath a brick railway arch in Hackney, e5 Bakehouse is a like a mystical alcove half-hidden in the hem of London Fields’ slab skirts, the kind of workshop yeasted with a near-mythical potential, like the urban version of a tree hollow cookie mill. In this auspicious space founder Ben Mackinnon, master baker Eyal Schwartz and team are rekindling London’s love for traditional sourdoughs, like their Hackney Wild, a pain de campagne that takes three days to make. You might say they’re at the vanguard of a grassroots movement to bring back to the people true loaves, leavened by the patience of their makers.

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The future’s past, on Kings Road, London. From the Kinolibrary vaults.