accomodation

10

El Fenn Hotel, Marrakech

An old Riad turned into a stylish boutique hotel, where the charm of the preserved heritage meets a contemporary decor: with eclectic furniture and modern art. The luxury hotel includes 20 individually styled rooms, three swimming pools, a library, traditional hammam, an outstanding view terrace and three courtyards.

Every day during lunch there will be several parties of two straight men having lunch together, that insist I seat them at a table for four even though there are only two of them. Because I guess homosexuality can be transmitted through accidental undertable foot contact now? Who knew?

Right now you might be asking “What happens when four straight men are having lunch together?”

Well what do you think?

They ask for a table for six. I shit you not.

I was airing my humorous grievance to our daytime bartender who only nodded and said. “They order wine and ask me to bring it in a pilsner glass.”

The cocktail server corroborated this saying some straight men will demand he show them the glass a drink comes in to make sure it’s suitably “masculine” looking before they order it.

And the dishwashers hate this because it makes their jobs much more complicated. It’s really not fun to have to drop what you’re doing to scrub dried red wine out of the bottom of a narrow pilsner glass. Especially when they have literally THOUSANDS of other dishes you have to do in a short amount of time.

Straight men ask for special accomodations for their straightness all the time.

That being said, Disabled folks, chronically ill folks, folks with severe allergies and other special needs:

NEVER feel ashamed to request the accomodations you require to enjoy your time at a restaurant. Hand to God we are happy to do it for you- a person who actually needs it.

It would honestly be a nice break from catering to all that fragile masculinity.

PLEASE INCLUDE DISABLED PEOPLE IN YOUR ACTIVISM.

(note: I’m not gonna talk about Trump mocking Serge Kovaleski primarily b/c Kovaleski does not ID as disabled and does not want to be used as a political talking point. Which is fair.  yes, it was awful. no, you don’t get brownie points for agreeing with me that it was awful. Disabled people have evolved to have thick skin, and a politician mocking us is not new or unsurprising. this list will deal with policy and specific issues facing the broader disability, autistic, d/Deaf//HoH, and neurodivergent communities.)

(other note: I generally use adjective-first language but I probably also used person-first language in here somewhere. I personally prefer to use the former for myself but I respect that other people in this community use different language.)

-the federal site for IDEA has been taken down

-all mentions of disability rights have been deleted from the website

-betsy devos had no idea what the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act was when asked and stated that standards for accommodations in education should be left up to the state (this is a TERRIBLE idea)

-if Obamacare is repealed, we have the most to lose. Most of us will not be able to afford medical expertise or treatment to maintain a basic quality of life. Some of us will die.

-he called one of his books Crippled America. Unironically. Ugh. 

-the january 2017 unemployment rate for nondisabled civilians was 4.9. For disabled civilians, it was 11.0. These numbers do not reflect the number of disabled individuals who work inadequate part time jobs, who are institutionalized, or have given up looking for work.

-the US still has not signed the UN documents about the rights of People with Disabilities. 

-Justices like Justice Kennedy have historically been swing votes on cases involving disabilities. Justices like Scalia have not. Potential Supreme Court Justice Gorsuch has a very ugly disability rights record, which includes defending a college that fired a professor undergoing chemo when she requested to give her lectures over skype (there was a flu going around on campus and being there would put the staff member in danger due to her suppressed immune system)

-By the time he was elected, Donald Trump had already dealt with at least eight lawsuits concerning lack of basic accessibility (ramps, braille) on his properties

-the Supreme Court case legalizing the sterilization of potentially disabled people without their consent (Buck v. Bell) has never been overturned and has been cited as a legal precedence in a lower court as recently as 2001.

-the Judge Rotenburg Center is still using painful electric shocks on disabled students as punishment, despite the FDA advising them to stop more than two years ago.

-similarly, many disabled people are not  paid federal minimum wage b/c section 14c of the “Fair Labor Standards Act” is still on the books and so hundreds of thousands of disabled peoples’ wages are “proportional” to their productivity (compared to an abled worker). Goodwill is one of the most famous companies that exploits this loophole.

-the already gutted SSDI program is even more at risk-Trump has spoken about emulating the British reforms for their disability program. Off the top of my head, I can think of nine or ten different people who died as a result of the recent “fit to work” assessments and bedroom requirements in the UK.

-disabled people depend on the Department of Justice’s civil rights division to enforce the ADA and protect us from blatant discrimination. Trump has already proven that he does not care about the funding or effectiveness of the department, and is willing to destabilize it to forward his political goals. 

-Donald Trump is anti-vax and is complacent to that movement’s violent and intolerable rhetoric surrounding autistic and other neurodivergent individuals

-Sessions called disabled children protected by federal laws (like IDEA) “the single most irritating problem for teachers throughout America today”. In this same statement, he stated that he did not “remember hearing of gun shootings prior to 1975 when Congress began telling ten percent of our students [they] are not responsible” (the IDEA was passed in 1975, improving the way disabled children were treated at public schools)

-the new administration’s refusal to address fatal police brutality is also an issue of disability rights, given that around half of victims shot by police officers are disabled or neurodivergent. (like eric garner, who had asthma) 


In case this list didn’t clue you in: the disabled community is scared. We don’t know what to expect from the next four years, we still haven’t come close to equality, and we are usually left to fight our battles alone. That’s why I’m asking whoever reads this to stand with the disability community against ableism and against policies that will kill us. People have done a great job in the past few weeks of expressing solidarity with muslims, immigrants, refugees, latinx people, LGBT people, and black people. And, honestly, that’s great. Thank you and please keep doing it. But also be aware that disabled people are one of the most vulnerable demographics right now, and be aware that we’re also one of the most ignored. We are made invisible by the media and by society too easily. Please, you have to see us and you have to stand with us. 

Looking back on history, it’s impossible not to notice that people with disabilities don’t fare well in authoritarian regimes. Please help us make this time different.

Accomodation - Italian vocabulary
  • l’hotel, l’albergo - hotel
  • l’ostello - hostel
  • bed&breakfast
  • una camera singola - a single room
  • una camera doppia - a double room
  • il letto - bed
  • il letto singolo - single bed
  • il letto matrimoniale - double bed
  • il letto ad una piazza e mezza - queen-size bed
  • il letto a castello - bunk bed
  • il cuscino - pillow
  • la federa - pillow case
  • il lenzuolo - bed sheet
  • il coprimaterasso - mattress cover
  • il copriletto - bedspread
  • la biancheria - linen
  • il servizio in camera - room service
  • la chiave - key
  • la camera da letto - bedroom
  • la cucina - kitchen
  • il bagno - bathroom
  • il ristorante - restaurant
  • Come posso aiutarla? - How can I help you? 
  • Ha prenotato una stanza? - Do you have a reservation?
  • A che nome è la prenotazione? - What name is the reservation under?
  • Abbiamo alcune stanze libere - We have some rooms available
  • Per quanto tempo resterà / resterete? - How long will you be staying?
  • Ha / avete qualche stanza libera? - Do you have any available room?
  • Ho una prenotazione a nome di… - I have a reservation under…
  • Resterò / resteremo (per) una settimana  - We will be staying a week
How Hotels, Resorts, etc., Can Improve Accessibility Without Spending a Bunch of Money

It’s simple, really. On your website have:

  1. Pictures of your accessible rooms of each type (standard room, suite, etc.) including the bathroom.
  2. Instead of saying things like “Our accessible rooms can accommodate most standard electric and manual wheelchairs”, give measurements for things in both inches and centimeters. Measure the width of any doors (including closets) as well as the height of fixtures like sinks or counter tops.
  3. A description of each type of accessible room that covers things like where the main power outlets are in the room, the distance between bed(s) and the nearest wall, and the distance between the TV and foot of the bed.
  4. Have a separate page on your site called “Accessibility” (or whatever your site’s copy editor agrees to) where you call out any unique accommodations your establishment might have that would help a customer with an accessibility requirement (e.g., a TTY in every accessible room, roll in showers, special accommodations for service animals, etc.,). Separate the list of accommodations by the type of disability they serve (visual, hearing, etc.,)
  5. Provide an online form specifically for answering questions about accessibility

Here’s the truth about accessibility in hotels: If a hotel is accessible enough to remove a stress point from my travels, I will always stay at that hotel (or hell, chain of hotels if they’re consistent). That hotel will have one a customer for life. There’s nothing that brings me more joy than staying at a place that cares about every type of customer that comes through its doors.

Readers: Did I miss anything? Sound off in the comments

3

I like how the implication of this is that kageyama doesn’t even bother to tell tsukishima that he’s gonna do this anymore. He just sets the ball sky high out of nowhere and trusts that tsukishima will accomodate accordingly. He wouldn’t be able to pull that shit with anyone, maybe not even hinata, but he knows his teammates and he knows tsukishima will be able to pick up on what’s happening and quickly make up the difference.

5

Elderflower Default Eye Replacements
For Cats and Dogs

Calling all good boys and girls, it’s time to get pawsitively adorable around here! Introducing @teanmoon‘s Elderflower Eyes as defaults for your little furry companions. What more is there to say?

~All 9 Base Game colors replaced

~Heterochromia Enabled

Download [Default Eye Replacements]

All credit goes to @teanmoon for the recolorable PSDs and texture. I did have to create a custom cat eye pupil but otherwise give her some love <3 If she decides she wants to do her own set i will be happy to accomodate but i couldnt wait til she responded to my request XD

Recognizing uniqueness is not a substitute for thinking about disability

Teachers who are really good at teaching typically developing kids sometimes have trouble understanding the significance of disability. I’ve heard a lot of things like “all kids are unique” and “I always individualize my approach for every kid” and “I don’t see the need to label any kids as disabled, it’s just a matter of finding what works for them”.

This sounds positive, but it can be a disaster for kids with disabilities.

We talk a lot about uniqueness, but a lot of effective teaching depends on understanding ways in which kids are similar to each other. Developmentally appropriate practice means understanding how kids the same age are similar to each other — then being flexible in ways that recognize kids’ unique humanity. We develop a sense of what the range of difference is for kids of a particular age.

Kids with disabilities are more different than that, and we need to take those differences seriously. Disability matters, and practices based on typical developmental milestones don’t account for it.

For instance:

Developmental milestones tell us:

  • Two year olds don’t have the motor skills to support handwriting.
  • Early education helps two year olds develop the motor skills that will eventually support handwriting.
  • Ten year olds do have the motor skills to support handwriting.
  • If they’ve had appropriate education, ten year olds should be able to write.

Developmental milestones don’t tell us:

  • How to teach ten year olds who don’t have the fine motor skills to support handwriting.
  • What early literacy and pre-writing instruction looks like for young children who are unlikely to develop the motor skills needed to support handwriting

It’s also important to understand the difference between unusual and unique. Disability means having unusual differences. But not every difference is unique. Some differences are shared by other people with disabilities. Those shared differences are important.

We need to understand the disability-related similarities. Part of that is having the right words to describe them. Calling disabilities by their right names isn’t about labeling, it’s about breaking isolation and making important things speakable.

For instance:

Braille:

  • Braille exists because blind people need it to exist
  • The differences between sighted people and blind people are a reason that braille needs to exist.
  • (And a reason that Braille is better than raised print).
  • The similarities between many blind people are a reason that braille *can* exist as a standard way of accessing literacy. 
  • If each blind person was completely unique, there would be no way to create a reading and writing system that would work for large numbers of blind people.

Some other examples:

  • Wheelchairs.
  • Ramps.
  • Large print.
  • Cars with hand controls and/or wheelchair lifts.
  • Text-to-speech communication devices.
  • VoiceOver and other screen reading software.
  • Signed languages.
  • Medications that manage symptoms.
  • Supportive seating.
  • The ADA, Section 504, IDEA and other disability rights laws.

People with disabilities are unique, and not interchangeable with each other. Similarly, kids the same age are unique, and not interchangeable with each other. Both the similarities and differences are important.

Tl;dr Sometimes progressive educators are uncomfortable with the concept of disability, and want to instead just see every kid’s uniqueness. That doesn’t work, because disability means having unusual differences — and because the differences aren’t unique; they’re shared with many other disabled people. Recognizing uniqueness isn’t enough — we also need to understand and accommodate disability.