accessible books

[Image: tweet by Titanium Cranium (@FelicityTC) including three screenshots of a Harry potter book in three different formats on Amazon. Text:

“Harry Potter on Amazon -

Print: $6.39
Audio: $44.99
Braille: $100.00

#CripTax”]

no but (among the 1424356 other things on my list) i so need to write a book about medieval history for a popular audience, just because the reality would blow people’s minds

there are so many things you can learn from it, so many misconceptions to destroy, and such an interesting social and cultural study of people learning to do things in different ways after rome fell. they had a period of almost 1000 years where classical culture was NOT the automatic standard. that is why we have gothic architecture and script. why they invented new literary and artistic genres, why they developed new laws. where, unlike in the ancient world, women and slaves were not relegated to a position of utter inferiority – in fact, slavery was abolished throughout most of the middle ages, and only began returning in the 16th-17th century when people were determined to replicate the criteria and legal systems of antiquity. same with women. you can find records of women doctors, bookbinders, copyists, shopkeepers, traders etc throughout the high middle ages. women religious were HUGELY influential; the abbey of fontevrault in france was required to have an abbess, not an abbot, in charge. queens regularly ruled whenever the king wasn’t around. it was only in 1593 that france, for example, decided to outlaw them from public/professional life. the salic law, made by philip iv in the early 14th century, barred them from inheriting the throne and later spread throughout europe, but that was not the case beforehand.

don’t talk to me about how “feudal anarchy” was a thing. feudalism was the last thing from anarchy, and it wasn’t about a lord mistreating or killing his peasants however he pleased. it was a highly structured and regulated system of mutual obligations – not a desirable condition for the serf, but still the bedrock on which society functioned. serfs were not slaves. they had personhood, social mobility, could own property, marry, form families, and often obtain freedom once they were no longer in an economic condition to make serfhood a necessity. abbot suger of france (late 11th-early 12th century) was most likely a son of serfs. he was educated at the same monastery school as the later king louis vi, ran the kingdom while louis vii was on crusade, and became the foremost historian of the period and partially responsible for establishing the tradition of ecclesiastical chronicles.

don’t talk to me about how everyone was a fervent and uncritical religious fanatic. church attendance on the parish level was so low that in 1215, pope innocent III had to issue a bull ordering people to take communion at least once a year. the content of clerical grievances tells us that people behaved and thought exactly as we do today – they wanted to sleep in on sunday, they wanted to have sex when they pleased, they didn’t believe the guy mumbling bad latin at them, they openly questioned the institutional church’s legitimacy (especially in the 13th century – it was taking assaults on every side as splinter and spinoff sects of every nature grew, along with literacy and the ability of common people to access books and learning for themselves). in the 14th century, john wycliffe and the lollards blasted the rigidly hierarchical nature of medieval society (“when adam delved and eve span, who then was the gentleman?”) partly as a result, wat tyler, a fellow englishman, led the peasants’ revolt in 1381. yes, the catholic church had a social and institutional power which we can’t imagine, but it was fought and questioned and spoken back to every step of the way.

don’t talk to me about how they were scientifically ignorant. isidore of seville, in the frickin 7th century, wrote books and books on science and reason from his home at the center of the andalusian “golden age” in muslim spain. toledo in the 9th century was a hotbed of theology, mathematics, and writing; admiring western european observers called multicultural, educated iberia “the ornament of the world.” in the 8th century in the monastery of jarrow in northumbria (aka in the middle of FRICKING NOWHERE) the venerable bede was able to open his “ecclesiastical history of the english people” with a discussion on cultural, linguistic, demographic, historical, geographical, and astronomical details, and refers to britain’s location near the north pole as a reason for its days being long in summer and short in winter (“for the sun has then departed to the region of Africa”). while bede’s information is obviously imperfect by virtue of his social and chronological location, he is a trained scholar with a strong critical sensibility and the ability to turn a memorable phrase; discussing an attempted imperial coup by an illiterate roman soldier, he sniffs, “As soon as he had seized power he crossed over to Gaul. There he was often deluded by the barbarians into making doubtful treaties, and so inflicted great harm on the body politic.”

don’t talk to me about how they were uneducated and illiterate. they were well versed in antiquity and classical authors through the high middle ages. they didn’t just suddenly discover them again when the 15th century started. the renaissance wasn’t about finding the texts, it was about deciding to apply them in a systematic way. beforehand, the 13th century saw the rediscovery of aristotle and the development of a new philosophical system to compete with the long-entrenched and studied works of plato. thomas aquinas and the dominicans were writing in this century. dante wrote the inferno in this century. i could go on.

don’t talk to me about the stereotype of the silent and oppressed woman – we already discussed that a bit above. i should also add, women usually had voting rights on the level of their community and this wasn’t regarded as odd. i already wrote a ranty post earlier on the myth that “it was just medieval times” and thus a rapey free-for-all.

we should also talk about how a form of gay marriage was legal for hundreds of years – two men could take wedding vows in a church and live together like any other married couple (though they called them “spiritual brotherhoods”). we should also talk about the cult of male bonds between knights in the 12th/13th century, and how it was idealized as the highest form of love. i also wrote a post a while ago about richard the lionheart and how sexuality worked. so.

we should talk about how all of this was happening in the time period that routinely gets written off as basically a wash between the fall of rome and the renaissance. we should remember that the renaissance was what led to modern structures of oppression for women, slaves, etc – everyone who had been worth nothing in antiquity. we should tear into the myth of historical progress and how it was invented to justify massive, wholesale colonization, genocide, and “civilization” in the supposedly enlightened 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries – because nothing we do now, apparently, can be as bad as what those bad ol’ bloodthirsty ignoramuses did back then.

we shouldn’t idealize the medieval era as a golden age either. that is never the right way to approach history. but we should take a long, long look at why we are so insistent on our simplistic, erroneous concepts of this time period, and how exactly they serve to justify our behaviors, mindsets, and practices today.

further reading to support any of these topics available on request.

78. The Ravenclaw common room has a hidden library, the entrance was like that of Diagon Alley - they had a secret code on the bricks - and an arch would open to allow entrance. Every Ravenclaw would leave a different book in the library when they left Hogwarts. Everyone wonders how Ravenclaws know so much, it’s because they have access to hundreds of books on every topic imaginable that the rest of Hogwarts could only dream of reading.

21 Recommended Books for Writers

As I’ve talked about on my blog several times, an important part of growing as a writer is learning about writing. For years I’ve wanted to compile a list of writing books I’ve read, liked, and recommend. Today I’m happy to say I now have that list to add to my blog (perfect timing for anyone who likes summer reading). I’m sure over time, this list will be added to.

Many writers I’ve talked to have read quite a few of these books. How many have you read? And is there one I need to look into? (You can comment at the bottom).

If you haven’t read any of them, cool. Now you have a list to chose from should you ever want to.


Hundreds of books have been written on the art of writing. Here at last is a book by two professional editors to teach writers the techniques of the editing trade that turn promising manuscripts into published novels and short stories.

In this completely revised and updated second edition, Renni Browne and Dave King teach you, the writer, how to apply the editing techniques they have developed to your own work. Chapters on dialogue, exposition, point of view, interior monologue, and other techniques take you through the same processes an expert editor would go through to perfect your manuscript. Each point is illustrated with examples, many drawn from the hundreds of books Browne and King have edited.

BUY / LEARN MORE

What makes a good story or a screenplay great?

The vast majority of writers begin the storytelling process with only a partial understanding where to begin. Some labor their entire lives without ever learning that successful stories are as dependent upon good engineering as they are artistry. But the truth is, unless you are master of the form, function and criteria of successful storytelling, sitting down and pounding out a first draft without planning is an ineffective way to begin.

Story Engineering starts with the criteria and the architecture of storytelling, the engineering and design of a story–and uses it as the basis for narrative. The greatest potential of any story is found in the way six specific aspects of storytelling combine and empower each other on the page. When rendered artfully, they become a sum in excess of their parts.

BUY / LEARN MORE 


Bestselling author David Farland has taught dozens of writers who have gone on to staggering literary success, including such #1 New York Times Bestsellers as Brandon Mull (Fablehaven), Brandon Sanderson (Wheel of Time), James Dashner (The Maze Runner) and Stephenie Meyer (Twilight).

In this book, Dave teaches how to analyze an audience and outline a novel so that it can appeal to a wide readership, giving it the potential to become a bestseller. The secrets found in his unconventional approach will help you understand why so many of his authors go on to prominence.

  ​ BUY / LEARN MORE


How do you create a main character readers won’t forget? How do you write a book in multiple-third-person point of view without confusing your readers (or yourself)? How do you plant essential information about a character’s past into a story?

Write Great Fiction: Characters, Emotion & Viewpoint by award-winning author Nancy Kress answers all of these questions and more! This accessible book is filled with interactive exercises and valuable advice that teaches you how to:

   Choose and execute the best point of view for your story
   Create three-dimensional and believable characters
   Develop your characters’ emotions
   Create realistic love, fight, and death scenes
   Use frustration to motivate your characters and drive your story.

BUY / LEARN MORE

The road to rejection is paved with bad beginnings. Agents and editors agree: Improper story beginnings are the single biggest barrier to publication. Why? If a novel or short story has a bad beginning, then no one will keep reading. It’s just that simple.

In Hooked, author Les Edgerton draws on his experience as a successful fiction writer and teacher to help you overcome the weak openings that lead to instant rejection by showing you how to successfully use the ten core components inherent to any great beginning.

Plus, you’ll discover exclusive insider advice from agents and acquiring editors on what they look for in a strong opening. With Hooked, you’ll have all the information you need to craft a compelling beginning that lays the foundation for an irresistible story!

BUY / LEARN MORE

Keep reading

*places tin foil hat on head*

So, this codex entry - I’d never really paid particular attention to it [I mean, it is just a list of books, right? Boring.]

But.

Take a look at the last title.

Elvehan Diis Falsis: Triew Metod Dracas

That caught my eye. Elvehan is very, very close to Elvenan. I can only assume the book is in Tevene [seeing how similar it is to Latin] so off I went to Google Translate. And here’s what I found out:

Diis Falsies means “false gods”.

Which [potentially] gives us “Elvenan False Gods”. We know, from what Solas mentions in Trespasser, that the Evanuris were false gods, who existed in the time of Arlathan. Very strange that a Tevene book mentions them.

The second half was more difficult to translate. The best I could come up with was:

Metod is very close to the latin word meto, which means “mow/ cut off/ reap”. I’m particularly interested in “cut off”, although I suppose “reap” is a possibility too.

Dracas is very similar to draco, which is latin for dragon. 

I wasn’t able to translate Triew. The closest I came was the latin word triens, which means “a third”. Since I’m not reasonably convinced on this word, I’ll remove it for now.

So we have Elvenan False Gods: [Triew] + Cut Off + Dragons

Now, things get interesting. Could the dragons refer to the Old Gods? If so, then ‘cut off’ could refer to the Evanuris being ‘cut off’ from their dragons - and what cut them off? The Veil. So does that mean there’s a bigger connection between the Old Gods and the Evanuris than we know?

Which brings us to the biggest puzzle of all: Who knew enough about the Evanuris, the creation of the Veil, and Tevene in order to write the book? The author is unknown. It might be possible that someone translated it from Elven, and if that were the case - who was the original author? It likely would have been someone who worked for/with Fen’harel. If that’s the case… then would this mysterious author still be around?

One thing is for certain, though. Solas spent his time in the Inquisition learning as much as he could about everything, using its resources to obtain access to books he otherwise wouldn’t have been able to as an elven apostate. I wonder how he learned about that particular book, though…

“I don’t like cats” - Bruce Wayne x Reader

“i love your stories. i have become addicted and i was wondering if you could write a batmom story of were selina kyle doesn’t know bruce is married and she comes to the manor in a very sexy outfit and batmom and the boys walk in on that and it very awkard. thanks :)” requested by @cheesecake-chic

Well, first, thank you, and then : here it is. I know a lot of you tell me I shouldn’t think my writing is shit, but with this one, I’m really…unsure. Meh, it’s all over the place. Anyway. Hope you’ll still like it

(My masterlist blog here : https://ella-ravenwood-archives.tumblr.com)

_________________________________________________

Today, Bruce woke up with the feeling that something bad was going to happen. Usually, his guts were always right and he spent the entire morning on edge…

But as the hours went by, and he saw that everyone was safe, he relaxed a bit. When your lips kissed his cheek lovingly as you came down in the kitchen for breakfast, he let go a little bit. When his sons didn’t even fight once, he let go a little bit. When Alfred made the best pancakes ever, he let go a little bit. When his hands wrapped around your waist to bring you closer, and his lips kissed your neck, while his sons made loud “ewwww” noises, he let go even more…And by noon, he was his normal self again. Still slightly worried about everything, a bit broody and all (though your presence made him smile like an idiot), but not waiting for a catastrophe anymore.

And oh how wrong he was to let his guard down. 

It was 10 pm when all Hell broke loose (ok, he was over-exagerating). 

It was 10 pm when Selina Kyle knocked on the Manor door, wearing a dress that was revealing a lot of skin. 

It was 10 pm when Selina Kyle invited herself in the Wayne family house, and after a sexy “Long time no see Bat” and her sultriest look, kissed Bruce without any warning as he was coming to the entrance hall to see who rung the door, curious of who came to visit at such an hour.

It was 10 pm when you came in as well, with all of your kids, wondering too who was ringing so late in the evening. 

Reflexively, as you all witnessed your Bruce pushing Catwoman away (oh the bitch stuck her tongue in his mouth !), your two oldest sons, Dick and Jason, held your shoulders…Just in case you decided to jump on Selina you know, and like, kill her or something. It was notoriously known that when you were jealous, you were dangerous. Granted, you weren’t often jealous, as Bruce only had eyes for you, and mostly ignored women who were hitting on him unsubtly (though none of them would ever dare doing it in front of you, and if they did, your natural sarcasm and wits would humiliate them right on the spot). 

Bruce’s eyes were going between you and Selina, and the worry he felt earlier in the day came surging back. He knew how well you and Selina fought, if you decided to attack, it would be a disaster…

But it didn’t seem like you were reacting. At all. Your sons were holding you by your shoulders, waiting to use all their strength to hold you if need be. Damian and Tim’s stance also showed they were ready to intervene. 

But you weren’t really reacting. You were just looking at Selina blankly, as if the things you just saw were trying to register themselves in your head. 

Keep reading

I can’t believe nobody’s given a shout out to Père Robert yet. I know it was an incredibly minor role but he was one of my favourite characters. He let Belle borrow his small collection of books because he knew the village didn’t approve of her reading and it was the only way she could access books. During the ‘Mob Song’ scene, he was basically the only person who didn’t flinch with fear when Belle revealed the Beast in the mirror. He very clearly wanted to stop the mob but couldn’t because, well it’s a mob, what can ya do?

Good on yer,  Père Robert!

All I Want - Jughead Jones

 Request: Hii! Could you maybe do one with Jughead where he thinks he’s not good enough for the reader so he starts distancing himself from them and they confront him and then just fluff please? Thnxxx love your writing 💕

Why thank you little cinnamon roll! Hope I did your request justice :)

Warnings: swearing

Jughead Jones x Reader

OH AND ALSO, I have nothing against Reggie. Personally I think there should be more imagines and stuff for him. CHUCK on the other hand, I hate with a fiery passion. He can spontaneously combust for all I care.

Cheers to @satanwithstardust for being trash and reading stuff as always cos she smells. Oh and @betty-coopers-number-one-stan for being my new friend because I’m alone ;c eheheh ENJOY

Words: 3,014 (longest one yet yayay)

“How long have you two been dating now?” Veronica queried, as you walked down Riverdale High’s empty corridors with her by your side. She was of course, referring to the ‘Sad Breakfast Clubs’ power couple, you and Jughead Jones. 

A light blush creeped onto your cheeks as you responded. “A few months now,” You tried to play it off casually, acting like you didn’t know it had been exactly 3 months and 17 days since he’d mustered the courage to ask you out on a date to Pop’s. Everything had escalated from there and you’d never felt happier. He was your best friend and the one you loved, and in your eyes, there was nothing better than falling in love with your best friend. 

Keep reading

I like to think that when Roadhog and Junkrat’s partnership developed into a friendship during their crime spree, Roadhog would tell Junkrat stories. Not stories about himself, no, those were too personal. But about movies and books. As they rode across dusty roads for hours on end, Roadhog would tell the plots of movies or books the best he could remember. He wasn’t the best story-teller or anything, but Junkrat loved the stories all the same (he especially liked the ones with grand explosions and people getting what was coming to them). Roadhog didn’t lie to Junkrat either and pretend that he made up the stories himself, Junkrat always knew they were all the plots from movies or books they didn’t have in Junkertown

Fast forward to when their friendship turned into something more, when the two of them got a chance to sleep in motel rooms rather than abandoned buildings, they would go out and get as many movies and books as they could and just go for it. In between crimes, they would just cuddle on the shitty motel bed and watch some new movies and some of the old movies Roadhog had told him about (Junkrat complained the whole time that the characters didn’t look how he imagined). Other days they would just sit around in comfortable silence, each reading a book, finishing it and then switching so the other could read it too.

Even with access to all new books and movies, Junkrat still liked when Roadhog told him stories on their long trips, partly for the story itself, partly to hear his voice.

In San Diego for a conference, and was actually on the first panel in my area, so now I am done and get to relax and just go to all the other panels and be an audience…

…and I think we’re going to try to put together an essay collection about Terry Pratchett, narrative structure, choice, and identity as constructed through free choice, and compassion, since we had three good papers already, on this panel, and the three of us got along really well and we were all enthusiastic about doing it. We have a publisher in mind, one I’ve worked with before, who aims for scholarly-but-accessible books and keeps prices pretty reasonable for academic-ish books (the same publisher I worked with for the Welsh myth in pop culture book, which got priced at $35). Seeing as how they’ve already sent me an email asking if I have any other ideas for books, I think they’ll say yes.

So: any academic/para-academic/scholar-fan/author peeps who are Terry Pratchett fans, if you think you could maybe put together an academic-ish (light on jargon, accessible tone, but with clear knowledge of the subject and relevant background for your particular approach, be it literary, creative, biographical, artistic, psychological, gender studies, medievalisms, fandom, etc) essay proposal (proposal: 300-700 words; final essays, probably roughly 5k words, but with an academic publishing timeline so you’d have like a year to write it; we’ll likely accept between 7 and 11 more contributions, plus our confirmed three)…anyway, if you want a relatively easy publication (subject to approval of proposal, of course), send me ideas and we’ll talk. (Obviously subject to publisher acceptance of our overall Book Proposal, but I don’t think it’ll be an issue as they’re asking *me* about the next book….)

Tagging a few people who might be interested: @turtletotem, @significantowl, @almondmocha, @dduane (hey, why not aim high?), @whtaft (are you a Pterry person? I forget), @ninemoons42, @neil-gaiman (let’s aim even higher! also hi Neil we’ve actually met, at another conference, in Florida!), um, I KNOW I’m forgetting someone so feel free to share.

Extra Mile | Miami

Imagine Loki coming in on you listening to one of the podcasts you’ve been catching up on or binging on. You explain it was a find after you’d finished listening to another podcast from PocastOne, you wanted to see what else they had there and the screaming child on their icon got you in. You listened to a couple of shows of For Crying Out Loud and you were hooked on it too. You give Loki access to the ones you have, and a week later you find him telling you about shows you hadn’t heard. Turns out he became a premium member of PodcastOne, so that he could get access to their older shows because he was completely hooked; thanks to you. He can stop smiling as he tells you that now he has found a show that clicked with him. It’s then you notice behind him on his coffee table is the book “Sippy Cups are Not For Chardonnay” which you’ve been wanting to read for a while, only for Loki to give it to you as a thank you for getting him hooked on Stephanie and Lynette.

Hate it or Love it: 50 quotes from MLK that white people can use besides ‘hate cannot drive out hate’

Every year around Martin Luther King Jr. Day everyone likes to drop an inspirational quote from Dr. King. Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a multifaceted philosopher and an amazing orator with a plethora of accessible speeches, sermons and books; yet, somewhere along the way it seems as if a rule was created, restricting white people to one quote in particular:

Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

I don’t know the reason behind the restriction; perhaps because this is one of the better quotes to try to push the “I don’t see color; we’re one race – the human race” agenda. Or perhaps the darkness and the light can be used to represent black and white and thus play into the white savior movement. Whatever the reason may be! BlackHistoryDay.tumblr.com is here today to give you 50 quotes from Dr. King that I encourage you to keep in mind for your future references:

1. “No movement of essentially revolutionary quality can be neat and tidy.”

2. “The only answer that one can give to those who would question the readiness of the Negro for integration is that the standards of the Negro lag behind at times not because of an inherent inferiority, but because of the fact that segregation and discrimination do exist.” 

3. “There is no more torturous logic than to use the tragic effects of segregation as an argument for its continuation.”

4. “It is one of the ironies of history that in a nation founded on the principle that all men are created equal, we’re still arguing over whether the color of a man’s skin determines the content of his character.”

5. “There comes a time, my friends, when people get tired of being plunged across the abyss of humiliation, where they experience the bleakness of nagging despair. There comes a time when people get tired of being pushed out of the glittering sunlight of life’s July and left standing amid the piercing chill of an alpine November.”

6. “There are some things that we’ve got to learn to sacrifice for. And we’ve got to come to the point that we are determined not to accept a lot of things that we have been accepting in the past.” 

7. “We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality…”

8. “We must see now that the evils of racism, economic exploitation and militarism are all tied together… you can’t really get rid of one without getting rid of the others… the whole structure of American life must be changed. America is a hypocritical nation and [we] must put [our] own house in order.”

9. “What good is having the right to sit at a lunch counter if you can’t afford to buy a hamburger?” 

10. “Increasingly, by choice or by accident, this is the role our nation has taken, the role of those who make peaceful revolution impossible by refusing to give up the privileges and the pleasures that come from the immense profits of overseas investments.”

11. “If we will but make the right choice, we will be able to speed up the day, all over America and all over the world, when justice will roll down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.”

12. “That the poor white has been put into this position, where through blindness and prejudice, he is forced to support his oppressors. And the only thing he has going for him is the false feeling that he’s superior because his skin is white—and can’t hardly eat and make his ends meet week in and week out.” 

13. “Through our scientific and technological developments we have lifted our heads to the skies, and yet our feet are still firmly planted in the muck of barbarism and racial hatred. Indeed this is America’s chief moral dilemma.”

14. “To keep a group of people confined to nasty slums and dirty hovels is not a State Right, but a State Wrong.”

15. “It may be true that morals cannot be legislated, but behavior can be regulated.”

16. “It may be true that laws and federal action cannot change bad internal attitudes, but they can control the external effects of those internal attitudes.”

17. “The law may not be able to make a man love me, but it can keep him from lynching me.”

18. “Even this nation came into being with a massive act of law breaking; for what implied more civil disobedience than the Boston tea party…there’s nothing new about law breaking.”

19. “God has brought us here for this hour to tell us to save America because our white brothers is carrying it more and more to destruction and damnation.”

20. “We’re called to do it so that means we can’t stop. This should make us more determined than ever before.”

21. “Now they always tell us to cool off and I know that when you get people cooling off too much they will end up in a deep freeze. They tell us to slow up and some of them even say that the Negros in Albany out to go home and be quiet because there’s a political campaign going on and you may help elect some particular candidate that shouldn’t be in office. Well I don’t know if you have an answer for them and I don‘t know if I have an absolute answer but I want to say to those who are telling us to stop merely because a political campaign is going on that this is a moral issue for us. We’re moving on towards freedom’s land. We cannot stop our legitimate aspirations for freedom merely because some immoral person will use this for his own political aggrandizements…”

22. “We worked in this very nation 2 centuries without wages. We made cotton king; we built our homes and the homes of our masters in the midst of injustice and exploitation. Yet out of a bottomless vitality we continue to grow and to live and if the inexpressible cruelties of slavery didn’t stop us, the opposition that we now face cannot stop us.”

23. “The absence of brutality and unregenerate evil is not the presence of justice.”

24. “As the nation passes from opposing extremist behavior to the deeper and more pervasive elements of equality, white america reaffirms its bonds to the status quo.”

25. “Whites, it must frankly be said, are not putting in a similar mass effort to reeducate themselves out of their racial ignorance.”

26. “It is an aspect of their sense of superiority that the white people of America believe they have so little to learn.”

27. “To find the origins of the Negro problem we must turn to the white man’s problem.”

28. “It seems to be a fact of life that human beings cannot continue to do wrong without eventually reaching out for some rationalization to clothe their acts in the garments of righteousness.”

29. “The greatest blasphemy of the whole ugly process was that the white man ended up making God his partner in the exploitation of the Negro.”

30. “Just as the ambivalence of white Americans grows out of their oppressor status, the predicament of Negro Americans grows out of their oppressed status.”

31. “Negroes have grown accustomed now to hearing unfeeling and insensitive whites say: ‘other immigrant groups such as the Irish, the Jews and the Italians started out with similar handicaps, and yet they made it. Why haven’t the Negroes done the same?’ These questioners refuse to see that the situation of other immigrant groups a hundred years ago and the situation of the Negro today cannot be usefully compared.”

32. “The Negro was crushed, battered and brutalized, but he never gave up. He proves again that life is stronger than death.”

33. “A riot is at bottom the language of the unheard. It is the desperate, suicidal cry of one who is so fed up with the powerlessness of his cave existence that he asserts that he would rather be dead than ignored.”

34. “What is needed today on the part of white America is a committed altruism which recognizes this truth.”

35. “True altruism is more than the capacity to pity; it is the capacity to empathize. Pity is feeling sorry for someone; empathy is feeling sorry with someone. Empathy is fellow feeling for the person in need— his pain, agony and burdens.” 

36. “I can never be who I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. This is the way our world is made.”

37. “True education helps us on the one hand to know truth, but more than that it helps us to love truth and sacrifice for it. It gives us not only knowledge, which is power, but wisdom, which is control.”

38. “If you can’t fly, run; if you can’t run, walk; if you can’t walk, crawl; but by all means keep moving.”

39. “We will move out of these mountains that have so often impeded our progress, the mountain of moral and ethical relativism, the mountain of practical materialism, the mountain of corroding hatred, bitterness and violence, and the mountain of racial segregation.”

40. “…Always have faith in the possibility of getting over to the Promised Land. Don’t become a pessimist and feel that we cannot get there; it is difficult sometimes, it is hard sometimes, but always have faith that the Promised Land can be achieved and that we can possess this land of brotherhood and peace and understanding.”

41. “An individual who is not concerned about his selfhood and his freedom is at that moment committing moral and spiritual suicide…”

42. “But I know, somehow, that only when it is dark enough can you see the stars.”

43. “There comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular but he must take it because conscience tells him it is right.”

44. “Many people fear nothing more terribly than to take a position which stands out sharply and clearly from the prevailing opinion.”

45. “Many sincere white people in the south privately oppose segregation and discrimination, but they are apprehensive lest they be publicly condemned.”

46. “’Do not conform’ is difficult advice in a generation when crowd pressures have unconsciously conditioned our minds and feet to move to the rhythmic drum beat of the status quo.”

47. “This tragic attempt to give moral sanction to an economically profitable system gave birth to the doctrine of white supremacy.”

48. “Unlike physical blindness that is usually inflicted upon individuals as a result of natural forces beyond their control, intellectual and moral blindness is a dilemma which man inflicts upon himself by his tragic misuse of freedom and his failure to use his mind to its fullest capacity.”

49. “Only through the bringing together of head and heart-intelligence and goodness shall man rise to a fulfillment of his true nature.”

50. “Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

Enjoy.

I am full of salt this morning, so I’m getting into it.

I love Inquisition overall, it is a fun good game. BUT I absolutely hate that the game was filled with hating on the Dalish and tearing them down. The Dalish are fucking amazing. Yes, they have their issues as all societies do but the Dalish are those who chose not to live in the human cities, who took to the wilds and disappeared. 

And casual fucking reminder that the Dalish have a separate culture from Ancient Elvhenan. Each clan has a distinct culture of its own too, complete with their own stories, songs, traditions, and potentially even vallaslin to dedicate themselves to their gods. 

Another causal fucking reminder that the Dalish had everything stolen from them. Since the elves were enslaved by Tevinter to when Orlais lead an “Exalted March” to seize the Dales, the elves have had their history stolen from them and warped by humans. So it is not a surprise for humans to have greater access to books and stories of the past and of ancient Elvhenan but the humans do not know more about the Dalish than the Dalish do and they do not understand the cultural implications of what they use. 

The Dalish deserve better than what Inquisition gave them.  

Library- Fred Weasley

Originally posted by clbuspotter

Pairing: Fred Weasley x Reader

Characters: Fred Weasley, George Weasley

Warnings: N/A

Request: Anon- could you please write a fred weasley oneshot where the reader is an introverted and kind of reserved hufflepuff and he’s taken a lot of interest in her from afar and tries to talk to her 

Word Count: 757

Author: Charlotte

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