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Futurama actually did a really great episode that serves as criticism for the ‘cure-all’ effect that so many authors/writers like to use.

The episode starts with Leela going to a reunion at her old orphanage. She remembers how everyone used to pick on her because of her eye. It turns out that everyone’s still picking on her, even though she’s a successful captain and they’re all bums. One of the guys who used to pick on her when she was younger is the only one to stand up for her. The guy tells her that he’s a surgeon and can give her two eyes. Leela excitedly accepts the offer, saying that it’s her one chance to finally be normal. Fry is against the surgery and tells her that she’s already beautiful the way she is. Leela has the surgery anyway and soon dates the surgeon. The surgeon keeps reminding her that she is completely normal. When things get serious, the two decide to adopt a child. Leela’s heart goes out to a girl with an ear on her forehead. Yet the surgeon dismisses this and says that there are plenty of normal children that they can choose from. Leela’s insistent and then this conversation happens:

Adlai: Oh, alright. If you really want that one, I can give her an operation to make her acceptable.

Leela: She doesn’t need an operation! She’s fine the way she is!

Adlai: Oh, and I suppose you were fine the way you were?

Leela: Damn right I was!

Fry: Yay!

Leela: Shut up, Fry. Now look, Adlai. I’m proud to be different. And I just wished I’d realized that when I was her age.

She then has the surgeon put her eye back the way it was.

And this is so important to me!

So many abled authors, even great ones like J.K. Rowling, think that they’re doing something good when they say that the disabilities in their world would be cured. It’s so refreshing to actually see a show that points out that the character don’t have to be cured - that they’re fine the way they are!

natashatracy.com
Children with a Mental Illness – Yes, it Could be Your Child
Yes, children and teens can have mental illnesses - even YOUR child can have a mental illness - do not ignore it, get them help.

I give presentations on mental illness in different places, and one of those places is in schools. Kids aged 12-18 get to hear about mental illness, stigma and my personal story of bipolar disorder. This takes around an hour. And after hearing an hour of me speak about my personal challenges and about how I have faced down bipolar disorder are a myriad of treatment failures, the teens often feel a certain closeness with me. I suspect it is for this reason that after the presentation, so many of them come up and talk to me. They talk about how they have been in the hospital or how they have a friend with bipolar or that they think they might have a mental illness.

And, of course, if a teen thinks they have the symptoms of a mental illness I always say, “Have you talked to your parents about this?”

And I always expect them to look at me like I just said something ridiculous because when I was their age, I sure would have found the notion laughable.

But they generally don’t. Many, many of them have, indeed, talked to their parents. And what have the parents done?

Nothing.

Their parents have done nothing.

The parents have said that they don’t believe the child or they have brushed away the subject as if it were permission to get their ears pierced. So now, the child, clearly in pain, some of them, in fact, crying, is standing in front of me, wanting to know what to do.

[photo // post]

[[ Image Description: A photo featuring a serval carefully crossing a marshy area viewed from above, with a post on it by user silversarcasm.

The post reads: “the anit-vax movement is built on and perpetuates fear, hatred, revulsion and vilification of Autistic people

it is not brave or new or radical to be an antivaxxer, it is not standing up to a scientific conspiracy, it is supporting an industry profiting off of the murder and abuse of Autistic people

just a friendly fucking reminder” ]]

thestar.com
Stephen Harper a ‘control freak,’ Patrick Brazeau says in online column
Sen. Patrick Brazeau calls Conservative Leader Stephen Harper, who kicked him out of caucus, “a control freak” in online essay.

Sen. Patrick Brazeau, who was expelled from the Conservative caucus, is urging Canadians to vote Stephen Harper out of office in an online essay that likens his leadership style to a dictatorship.

“Harper is a control freak,” Brazeau wrote in a 1,608-word column published by the online political news site Loonie Politics. The essay begins with his thoughts on how Harper has been responding to questions about the criminal trial of Sen. Mike Duffy.

“When I was in caucus, very few challenged him. Those who did were shut down, those who had differing opinions were silenced,” wrote Brazeau, claiming he once “shamed” Harper in front of his caucus for not calling an inquiry into the issue of missing and murdered aboriginal women.

“When you contradict, shame or make the PM look bad regardless of its significance, watch out because some of his soldiers are coming after you,” Brazeau wrote.

“Is that ‘PROVEN LEADERSHIP?’ No, it’s ‘PROVEN DICTATORSHIP’ and it scares me and it should scare you. I’m afraid of what Harper and his entourage will do to achieve their ends because I have lived it and they have done everything imaginable to ensure I lose my job even though I have been honest, open and accountable. For heaven’s sake, I haven’t had a fair trial yet. Luckily, that day will come for me. Unfortunately, that day will come for the Harper Conservatives,” Brazeau wrote.

Continue Reading.

can someone explain to me why, as autistic people, we’re expected to accommodate others, instead of us expecting others to reasonably accommodate us?

I understand there are more neurotypicals, that the world is the way it is, and it’s not other people’s jobs to make sure you’re happy, but jfc

is it too much to ask for the world to have less fluorescent lights? is it too much to ask for the world to not be so LOUD all the time? is it too much to ask to not be negatively judged if you rock in public, wear noise canceling headphones, only eat certain foods, or are nonverbal? is it too much to ask for people to show courtesy, patience, and respect when interacting with others, and to raise their kids to do the same?

I’m tired of this attitude of “the world’s not going to bend over backwards and cater to you just because you have a hard time with A, B, and C”

I don’t think it’s asking too much to wish the world was easier for everyone

life is hard enough.. why make it more challenging for those who are already struggling?