abby carmichael

Stokely [Carmichael] was a spellbinding orator. Through gestures and intonation, he articulated the rage of a movement that had seen too many dead, too many beaten, and too little progress. He mastered southern lingo to express his university-learned ideas—'We is [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee] all right but we ain’t students no more and you know somethin’ we ain’t nonviolent either.’

I studied him hard that night. The year before he had published a brilliant paper on the speech of rural Mississippi blacks. To teach it as faulty English, he argued, was a racial slur, which bred a sense of inferiority at the onset of public education. The paper triggered ideas in my head. My whole education taught me to lecture in a way foreign to my innate feelings about activism. Remain aloof from the subject, the university taught me, for only from that high unemotional plateau could one glimpse the truth. It was reasonable and rational. But to whom? The established power, of course.

Wasn’t there a way of speaking that evoked visual images, rather than spewing forth dead words in rhythmic, religious procession that bounced off dulled eardrums and dissipated into empty space? Wasn’t there a way of destroying the boundary between audience and speaker? To let people experience feelings as well as thoughts? Above all, to get people to act? Could revolutionaries afford to speak the King’s English?

Just as rock musicians study blues and soul music for inspiration, I built my style of verbal riffing on Stokely’s spoken R&B. Without realizing it, Stokely was one of the formulators of hippie dialect.
—  Abbie Hoffman, Soon to Be a Major Motion Picture
Shop time || Abby

The value of things that every person need on their lives, to keep themselves looking forward, dreaming and believing on what they want to, some of those things are material - such as money - some of them come from the bottom of their sould and heart, some of them are called friends. And that was exactly what Diana was needing those days and what she saw it was a big place on someone’s life after what happened to Mia. It was easy to see that it was impossible to live a life without problems, that even if they are normal problems or supernatural ones, that makes any human shivers and get scared to get out of their house. Running away was a coward option, so living and trying to be careful and to look after all of the ones she cares about was the best option, may be the only one plausible. Stay the whole time afraid of what will happen wouldn’t help her and would only make Diana lose time, time that would never come back. 

With that on her mind, Diana couldn’t do much but start to find things to do without forgetting about watching out for her safety and the others. She and Abby decided to go shopping after school and, for Diana - even though she had already shopping with Alexis and her father would probably kill her because of how much she was spending -, there wasn’t better way to be normal as looking for new clothes and spending some time with such good company as Abby. Getting ready, taking her time to get out of her house and pick up Abby for a day full of laughs, new clothes and a headache for parents. The day it was suppose to be. After  closing the zipper of her dress and put a jacket on top, Diana put your flat shoes and went downstairs in quick steps to the living room just to kiss the face of her father and tell him she was going out with a friend. After that, she took the car keys in the keychain attached to the wall of the corridor and made her way out of the house.

During the path, already on the car listening to songs and singing along as loud as she could; one of the rare times that Diana loosen up a little bit and let herself have some fun is on her car all by herself, and this time it wasn’t different. Mystic Falls is a small town, if anyone saw the girl the way she was at the moment it would probably make her blush and stop, but for now she was okay and she wanted to keep that way. Listening to The Script it was impossible to be quiet and the eight minutes until the girl’s house was enough to listen to some songs and get the spirit she needed for their fun. Money: check. Good mood: check. Problems let at home: check. If she could, she would get rid of her phone as well, but it could make her father worried about her, so bad decisions are better left undone.

After a while she saw her and to play with Abby, Diana opened the window and whistled at the girl, honking soon after. “We are just going shopping, not a club, Abby.” Diana smirked, unlocked the car’s door and stayed on her side waiting for the girl to enter so they could go. “Really, I love your clothes, it’s amazing. You will help me today!” Diana started the car and walked around the street changing her way to the main street of the town. “When we get there you choose the first place we are going.”