abandoned wales

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Keeper by Lee Acaster
Via Flickr:

Yemaya and Oshun abhor violence against women. David Brown gives this pataki,

Orunmila is called Ogbe Wale in this path. He was the husband of Oshún. Despite being treated well by Oshún, he made her suffer a lot, including hitting her when she got jealous, because he had many obiní in the street. Oshún took her complaints of what was happening to her sister, Yemayá, who advised her to leave this man. But Oshún was very much in love with him and didn’t want to leave Ogbe Wale. He abandoned her more as each day passed and each day Oshún dried up a little more.

Already tired of Oshún, Ogbe Wale robbed a calabaza from her and planted it on a violet bush. The bush sank into the marsh, calabaza and all, and this caused the death of Oshún. Upon seeing Oshún die, Ogbe Wale got scared, and so no one would find out, he buried her in the marsh together with the eleguedé plant.

Some years passed and Ogbe Wale married Yemayá. She was a mayombera and one day had to go to the marsh to look for shoma opalo root in order to prepare an inshe. There, at the foot of a tree, she stepped on some bones, and just then she heard a voice that said to her, “be careful daughter that you don’t step all over these bones. They belong to your sister, Oshún, who was the wife of Ogbe Wale, now your husband. He killed her. I am Yewá; look at my avatar.” And suddenly an owl appeared and said to her, “you must avenge your sister.”

Yemayá took a bone of Oshún and reduced it to a powder together with the shoma root and a jujú of the owiwí. When she got back to the ilé, she prepared a potion for Ogbe Wale. When he drank the potion, blood began to pour from all of the orifices in his body until he died. This was the revenge of Yemayá.