aaprp

African Liberation Day

African Liberation Day May 19, 2012   Inheriting and Continuing the Revolutionary Theory and Practice of  Kwame Nkrumah, Sekou Toure, and Kwame Ture    The Emergence Community Arts Collective  733 Euclid St. NW Washington, DC 20001   Time: 5 -10 pm   The All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (GC) is organizing African Liberation Day (ALD) 2012, in honor of El Hajj Malik Shabazz (Malcolm X) and Ho Chi Minh of the Republic of Vietnam. It is our objective that this ALD intensify the nation, class, and gender struggles in the African and international world by centering this political struggle, the struggle to more clearly define the revolutionary African Personality and Culture and the morals, values, ethics, and principles, which engender them. We believe that this ideological struggle will evolve into an understanding for all involved and for African People to clearly see that for the struggle for Pan-Africanism – the total liberation and unification of Africa under scientific socialism, to move to a higher stage, to take a qualitative leap forward, we must correctly analyze, inherit, and continue with a renewed commitment and dynamism the revolutionary theory and practice of Kwame Nkrumah, Sekou Toure, and Kwame Ture. We know the truth of Kwame Nkrumah‘s axiom “practice without thought is blind; thought without practice is empty”. History has documented that revolutionary ideology and organization are indispensable weapons of the oppressed, but struggling African Masses and of all Oppressed Humanity. African Liberation Day convenes at The Emergence Community Arts Collective, 733 Euclid St. NW Washington, DC 2001. The Diplomatic Reception, please RSVP, starts at 5 pm and the Symposium at 7:00 pm. We honor Ho Chi Minh and Malcolm X as May 19th is their birthdays. They were uncompromising fighters for their People and all Oppressed Humanity.
 Ho Chi Minh was a humble man, a servant of his People, a Vietnamese nationalist and socialist revolutionary who, while living in the US, attended meetings of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), led by Marcus Garvey and who would later direct Kwame Ture, formerly known as Stokely Carmichael, to Africa, and revolutionary Pan-Africanism. Kwame traveled to Vietnam following his attendance at the First Conference of the Organization of Latin American Solidarity in Cuba. It was in Hanoi; July 1967 that Kwame had an audience with “Uncle Ho”. It was Uncle Ho, as he was fondly called, that led the Vietnamese Revolution defeating both French and U.S. Imperialism in Vietnam. Malcolm X, a Muslim minister, was an uncompromising revolutionary Pan-Africanist, the son of a UNIA organizer. Malcolm X held a principled position in opposition to capitalism, imperialism, and zionism and all forms of oppression and exploitation. He was targeted by the FBI’s Counter-intelligence Program {COINTEL-PRO) and was assassinated February 21, 2965. He left the African world many political lessons and modeled African People’s and Oppressed Humanity’s dignified, revolutionary and fearless hatred of our primary and common enemy, U.S. led capitalism, imperialism, neo-colonialism, and zionism.
African Liberation Day, originally called Africa Freedom Day, was founded by Osageyfo Kwame Nkrumah at the First Conference of Independent African States, held April 15, 1958 in Accra, Ghana to mark the onward progress of the African Revolution. The name was later changed to African Liberation Day at the founding of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) May 25, 1963. This change reflected an intensification of the nation, class, and gender struggle in the African Revolution expressed in all forms of political struggle, but most significantly, in the armed struggle for National Liberation, Unification, and Socialism. ALD has been held in every corner of the world since it’s founding and is now fifty-four (54) years old.

Our ALD program Our ALD 2012 Program

African Liberation Day, originally called Africa Freedom Day, was founded by Osageyfo Kwame Nkrumah at the First Conference of Independent African States, held April 15, 1958 in Accra, Ghana to mark the onward progress of the African Revolution. The name was later changed to African Liberation Day at the founding of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) May 25, 1963. This change reflected an intensification of the nation, class, and gender struggle in the African Revolution expressed in all forms of political struggle, but most significantly, in the armed struggle for National Liberation, Unification, and Socialism. ALD has been held in every corner of the world since it’s founding and is now fifty-four (54) years old.
African Liberation Day 2012, which is organized by the All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (GC), convenes at The Emergence Community Arts Collective, 733 Euclid St. NW Washington, DC 2001. Elevator and limited parking at rear of building. Our ALD 2012 program includes:

ALD 2012 Diplomatic Reception (RSVP) - 5:00 pm –7:00 pm

Invited Speakers: Vietnam Press Agency; Embassy of Nicaragua; Cuban Interests Section; Embassy of Zimbabwe and Embassy of Venezuela Other Invited Guests include: Embassy of Angola; Embassy of Antigua and Barbuda; Embassy of Bolivia; Embassy of Dominica; Embassy of Mozambique; Embassy of Namibia; Embassy of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines; Embassy of South Africa; Embassy of Suriname ; Embassy of St. Lucia; Embassy of Syria; Embassy of Tanzania; Embassy of Trinidad and Tobago

 ALD 2012 Symposium - 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Panel I: Intensifying the Ideological Struggle in Africa, the African Diaspora, and the World.
Invited Panelists: Ismael Conde, Parti de la Revolution Populaire Africain de Guinee; Lang T.K.A. Nubuor, Centre of Consciencist Studies and Analyses; Representative of African Solidarity for Democracy and Independence in Mali (SADI) and a Representative of the National Council of Black Studies
Panel II: Anti-Repression and Resistance: From the Military Industrial Complex, Proxy Wars and Africom to the Industrial-Police-Intelligence Complex, the FBI, CIA and Mass Incarceration
Invited Panelists: Benjamin Woods, Students Against Mass Incarceration (SAMI); Abayomi Azikwe, Pan-African News Wire and Dr. Zoe Spencer, Professor of Sociology, Virginia State University

Happy solar return to our Big Brother, consumate master strategist and organizer Kwame Ture born June 29th. Chair to SNCC then PM to the Black Panther Party for a very brief period. Secretary to President Kwame Nkrumah then premier Pan Africanist organizer building the AAPRP as outlined in Nkrumah’s Handbook of Revolutionary Warfare! And we thank you 1,000X for your lifetime commitment, dedication and humanity! Pan Africanism lives on and it shall be realized!!! Long live Kwame Ture!!!
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Blazing Arrow Organization and Decolonize Portland celebrate the liberation of Alicia Jackson’s home on the Fourth of The Lie (July 4th)!

Video credit goes to Chris.

<3 Ce qui ne me tue pas me rend plus fort <3 long, long, long, long week and I wasn’t even part of the incredible #MayDay planning and actions that took place in #PDX and all across the nation today. Massive respect and love to #BlackLivesMatter PDX, the #AAPRP #APANO #PCHRP, all people and parties fighting for justice everywhere. My heart is with you, even if my body wasn’t. Please support #BlackSpring and #BaltimoreUprising in any way you can. #FTP #Decolonize #Indigenize

  The founding Fathers of the Organization of African Unity (OAU) in 1963…

African Liberation Day                       

African Liberation Day 2015 Theme: “All African Lives Matter: Organize at Home and Abroad”

Please see our ALD Newsletter for 2015 as well as a Brief History on African Liberation Day below:

http://www.aaprp-intl.org/pdfs/ALD15Tabloid.pdf

African Liberation Day, also known as ALD, was founded in 1958 by Dr. Kwame Nkrumah on the occasion of the First Conference of Independent States held in Accra, Ghana and attended by eight independent African states. The 15th of April was declared “African Freedom Day,” to mark each year the onward progress of the liberation movement, and to symbolize the determination of the people of Africa to free themselves from foreign domination and exploitation.

Between 1958 and 1963 the nation/class struggle intensified in Africa and the world. Seventeen countries in Africa won their independence and 1960 was proclaimed the Year of Africa. Further advances were made with the defeat of U.S. imperialism in Asia and the Caribbean. Imperialism responded to this tide of victories by assassinating revolutionary leaders and sending U.S. troops to Viet Nam. On the 25th of May 1963, thirty-one African Heads of state convened a summit meeting to found the

Organization of African Unity

(OAU). They renamed Africa Freedom Day “African Liberation Day” and changed its date to May 25th.

Today, African Liberation Day is a permanent mass institution in the world-wide Pan-African movement. As an institution, it is stronger today because the masses of African people are stronger and ALD is their day. As a day of work in the area of political education and organization, it reflects the fact that we have not obtained our freedom, and thus it is a day to reaffirm our commitment to Pan-Africanism, the total liberation and unification of Africa under scientific socialism. At ALD we also deepen our understanding of other just struggles and affirm our role in the world socialist revolution. ALD has but one direction, forward to a unified socialist Africa. It is growing as the level of awareness about Pan-Africanism and the primacy of Africa grows. It is growing as progressive and revolutionary organizations grow. And lastly, it is growing as the masses make increasing victories against capitalism, neo-colonialism, racism, and zionism.

The All-African People’s Revolutionary Party (AAPRP) is proud to be part of the Worldwide African Liberation Day network. For more on African Liberation Day and how you can be a part of the growing network, visit the African Liberation Day website: http://www.africanliberationday.net