a-lover's-discourse

Am I in love? – yes, since I am waiting. The other one never waits. Sometimes I want to play the part of the one who doesn’t wait; I try to busy myself elsewhere, to arrive late; but I always lose at this game. Whatever I do, I find myself there, with nothing to do, punctual, even ahead of time. The lover’s fatal identity is precisely this: I am the one who waits.
Is the scene always visual? It can be aural, the frame can be linguistic: I can fall in love with a sentence spoken to me: and not only because it says something which manages to touch my desire, but because of its syntactical turn (framing), which will inhabit me like a memory.
—  Roland Barthes, A Lover’s Discourse 
MUST READ: A Lover's Discourse by Roland Barthes

One of our favorite Roland Barthes’ A Lover’s Discourse beautifully and intelligently navigates the realms of loved. Examined with semiotic language, Barthes directs the meaning of love under a passionate psychological microscope. Barthes discusses with fervor the different facets of love: the hopeless romantic, the lustful infatuation, the agonizing terror of never getting a call back from your lover, the fear of abandonment, and the sacrificial martyr. We urge anybody who has ever been in love or has transformed themselves into an anxious lover to read Barthes’ psychoanalytic prose.  

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Language is a skin: I rub my language against the other. It is as if I had words instead of fingers, or fingers at the tip of my words. My language trembles with desire. The emotion derives from a double contact: on the one hand, a whole activity of discourse discreetly, indirectly focuses upon a single signified, which is “I desire you,” and releases, nourishes, ramifies it to the point of explosion (language experiences orgasm upon touching itself); on the other hand, I enwrap the other in my words, I caress, brush against, talk up this contact, I extend myself to make the commentary to which I submit the relation endure.
—  Roland Barthes.  A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments
To know that one does not write for the other, to know that these things I am going to write will never cause me to be loved by the one I love (the other), to know that writing compensates for nothing, sublimates nothing, that it is precisely there where you are not–this is the beginning of writing.
—  Roland Barthes, A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments
I gladly abandon dreary tasks, rational scruples, reactive undertakings imposed by the world, for the sake of a useless task deriving from a dazzling Duty: the lover’s Duty. I perform, discreetly, lunatic chores; I am the sole witness of my lunacy. What love lays bare in me is energy.
—  Roland Barthes, A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments
Language is a skin: I rub my language against the other. It is as if I had words instead of fingers, or fingers at the tip of my words. My language trembles with desire. The emotion derives from a double contact: on the one hand, a whole activity of discourse discreetly, indirectly focuses upon a single signified, which is “I desire you,” and releases, nourishes, ramifies it to the point of explosion (language experiences orgasm upon touching itself); on the other hand, I enwrap the other in my words, I caress, brush against, talk up this contact, I extend myself to make the commentary to which I submit the relation endure.
—  Roland Barthes, A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments