a taste of sonar

anonymous asked:

How did you learn which prepositions go with what verbs? I'm having trouble deciding whether or not I should put "de," "a," "por," etc. Do you still have trouble with this?

I think everyone has problems with it. 


For me it’s a question of English. For instance, my first instinct with soñar is de because in English it’s “to dream of”, but in Spanish it’s soñar con. And buscar has no preposition even though in English it’s “to search for”.

However, I find all of this very helpful:

[Copied from a past ask]

Hmm… This won’t be a complete list, but here are some off the top of my head. 

Verbal expressions that use a

  • jugar a + noun = to play (something; often sports or some type of game)
  • dedicarse a = to dedicate oneself to (something)
  • querer a (alguien) = to love (someone)
  • amar a (alguien) = to love (someone)
  • ayudar a (alguien / infinitivo) = to help (someone) / to help to (do something)
  • conocer a (alguien) = to meet/to know someone
  • llegar a = to lead to (something)
  • acostumbrarse a = to get used to (something)
  • atreverse a + infinitive = to dare to (do something)
  • ir a + infinitive = __ will do (something)
  • comenzar a + infinitive = to begin (to do something)
  • empezar a + infinitive = to begin (to do something)
  • obligar a +infinitive = to obligate (someone) to (do something)
  • volver a + infinitive = to (do something) again
  • oler a + object = to smell like (something)
  • saber a + object = to taste like (something)
  • sonar a + object = to sound like (something)
  • parecerse a = to look like (someone / something)
  • ser parecido/a a = to look like (someone / something)

[The problem with a is that sometimes it’s just required because it’s a personal a; like with querer, amar, and conocer]

Verbal expressions that use con

  • soñar con = to dream of (someone / something)
  • contar con = to rely on (someone / something)
  • amenazar con = to threaten (to do something)
  • comenzar/empezar con = to begin with (something / doing something)
  • estar con (alguien) = to be with (someone)
  • hablar con (alguien) = to speak with (someone)
  • relacionarse con (alguien) = to relate/connect to (someone)
  • casarse con (alguien) = to marry (someone)
  • tener que ver con = to have to do with (something)
  • encontrarse con = to find oneself by chance with (someone / something)
  • dar con = to happen upon OR to hit against (someone / something)
  • acabar con = to finish off, to finish up with, to deal with (someone / something)
  • quedarse con = to keep (something), to have inherited (something)

Verbal expressions that use en

  • pensar en = to think of/on/over (someone / something)
  • confiar en = to trust (someone / something)
  • tardar en + infinitive = to take a long time (doing something)
  • consistir en = to consist of (something)
  • meterse en = to become involved in (something)
  • entrar en = to enter into (a place or thing)
  • esperar en = to wait inside (a place)
  • convertirse en = to become, to become converted into (someone / something)

Verbal expressions that use de

  • estar enamorado/a de = to be in love with (someone)
  • cansarse de = to get tired of (someone / something)
  • hartarse de = to be fed up with (someone / something)
  • preocuparse de = to be worried about (someone / something)
  • acordarse de = to remember (someone / something)
  • olvidarse de = to forget (someone / something)
  • quejarse de = to complain about (someone / something)
  • convencerse de = to convince oneself about
  • arrepentirse de = to regret (something)
  • burlarse de = to make fun of (someone / something)
  • reírse de = to laugh at/about (someone / something)
  • aprovecharse de = to take advantage of (someone / something)
  • enterarse de = to find out about (someone / something)
  • dejar de + infinitive = to stop doing (something)
  • acabar de + infinitive = to have just done (something)
  • tratar de + infinitive = to try to do (something)
  • tratarse de = to have to do with, to make mention of (someone / something)
  • salir de = to leave from (somewhere)
  • llenar de = to fill up with (something)
  • pintar de = to paint (something a certain color)
  • vestir(se) de = to dress in (a type of fabric, a specific color, a style of clothing)

These (I think) are the most common ones. There are a few with por but those can be a bit confusing since, like a, sometimes por is necessary without meaning something separate but…

  • preguntar por = to ask about (someone / something)
  • votar por (alguien) = to vote for (someone)
    votar para (algo) = to vote for (something)
  • luchar por = to fight for (someone / something)
  • cambiar por = to exchange (someone / something) for (someone / something)
  • jurar por = to swear by (someone / something)
  • rezar por = to pray for (something / someone)
  • molestarse por = to fuss over, to worry about (someone / something)
  • disculparse por = to apologize for (someone / something)

Links that might help:

anonymous asked:

Could you make a post (if you haven't already) about the senses? And verbs like 'to see/look at' and 'to look *like*' with smell and taste and touch and sound?

I can do a small list since I haven’t done a larger list just yet.

The basics are…

  • los sentidos = the senses
  • la vista = sight/eyesight | ver = to see
  • el tacto = touch | sentir = to feel/to notice, tocar = to touch
  • el oído = hearing | oír = to hear / sonar = to make a sound
  • el olfato = smell | oler = to smell
  • el gusto = taste | probar = to taste


However, when something “tastes like (something else)” it’s saber a (algo)

And sonar a is “to sound like”…

And oler a  is “to smell like”…

And ver is more literally “to see”, so ver algo / ver a alguien is “to see something/someone”

And parecer means “to seem/to appear”… parecerse by itself means “to look alike”, and parecerse a algo/alguien means “to look like something/someone”, so people usually say se parece mucho a su madre “he/she really looks like their mother”

aceclint  asked:

Hey! Sorry if the question was asked before, but I'm not even sure what 'category' it falls under. when there's two infinitives (like in 'ella va a saber nadar') I can never figure out whether 'a', 'de' or nothing goes in between them. it seems to change randomly from verb to verb and I wondered whether there's rules to it? or if I just have to memorize it individually for every verb. thanks in advance!!!

It really depends on the verb.

For instance, ir + a + infinitivo is it’s own kind of construction, since a typically implies some kind of motion.

But that’s not always how it happens, since dedicarse a means “to dedicate oneself to (something)”.

*Note: This is different from “personal a“ which is when your object or recipient is a person you would use an a to mark them as a person or animate being. Like decir a alguien “to say to someone”

These are known as prepositional verbs. Most verbs that don’t take preposition, but some do.

And the ones that do are pretty common.

parecerse a = to look alike / to look like (someone else)

oler a = to smell like

saber a = to taste like

dar de comer = to feed

pensar en = to think of

acordarse de = to remember

vengarse de = to avenge

confiar en = to trust (in something/someone)

contar con = to count on (something/someone)

Most of the prepositional verbs take an a, de, en, or sometimes por / para.

Sometimes you’ll see con for specific verbs. Many times con verbs can exist without a con but the meaning is different. Like contar is normally “to count” or “to tell a story”… different than contar con alguien “to put one’s trust in someone”.

I’ll include some additional ones and some links to where the prepositional verbs are listed which will help.

[copied from a past ask]

Verbal expressions that use a

  • jugar a + noun = to play (something; often sports or some type of game)
  • dedicarse a = to dedicate oneself to (something)
  • querer a (alguien) = to love (someone)
  • amar a (alguien) = to love (someone)
  • ayudar a (alguien / infinitivo) = to help (someone) / to help to (do something)
  • conocer a (alguien) = to meet/to know someone
  • llegar a = to lead to (something)
  • acostumbrarse a = to get used to (something)
  • atreverse a + infinitive = to dare to (do something)
  • ir a + infinitive = __ will do (something)
  • comenzar a + infinitive = to begin (to do something)
  • empezar a + infinitive = to begin (to do something)
  • obligar a + infinitive = to obligate (someone) to (do something)
  • volver a + infinitive = to (do something) again
  • oler a + object = to smell like (something)
  • saber a + object = to taste like (something)
  • sonar a + object = to sound like (something)
  • parecerse a = to look like (someone / something)
  • ser parecido/a a = to look like (someone / something)
  • esperar a que + subjunctive = to await (something happening)

[The problem with a is that sometimes it’s just required because it’s a personal a; like with querer, amar, and conocer]

Verbal expressions that use con

  • soñar con = to dream of (someone / something)
  • contar con = to rely on (someone / something)
  • amenazar con = to threaten (to do something)
  • comenzar/empezar con = to begin with (something / doing something)
  • estar con (alguien) = to be with (someone)
  • salir con (alguien) = to go out with (someone)
  • romper con (alguien) = to break up with (someone)
  • hablar con (alguien) = to speak with (someone)
  • relacionarse con (alguien) = to relate/connect to (someone)
  • casarse con (alguien) = to marry (someone)
  • tener que ver con = to have to do with (something)
  • encontrarse con = to find oneself by chance with (someone / something)
  • dar con = to happen upon OR to hit against (someone / something)
  • acabar con = to finish off, to finish up with, to deal with (someone / something)
  • quedarse con = to keep (something), to have inherited (something)

Verbal expressions that use en

  • pensar en = to think of/on/over (someone / something)
  • confiar en = to trust (someone / something)
  • tardar en + infinitive = to take a long time (doing something)
  • consistir en = to consist of (something)
  • meterse en = to become involved in (something)
  • entrar en = to enter into (a place or thing)
  • esperar en = to wait inside (a place)
  • convertirse en = to become, to become converted into (someone / something)

Verbal expressions that use de

  • estar enamorado/a de = to be in love with (someone)
  • cansarse de = to get tired of (someone / something)
  • hartarse de = to be fed up with (someone / something)
  • preocuparse de = to be worried about (someone / something)
  • acordarse de = to remember (someone / something)
  • olvidarse de = to forget (someone / something)
  • quejarse de = to complain about (someone / something)
  • convencerse de = to convince oneself about
  • arrepentirse de = to regret (something)
  • burlarse de = to make fun of (someone / something)
  • reírse de = to laugh at/about (someone / something)
  • aprovecharse de = to take advantage of (someone / something)
  • enterarse de = to find out about (someone / something)
  • dejar de + infinitive = to stop doing (something)
  • acabar de + infinitive = to have just done (something)
  • tratar de + infinitive = to try to do (something)
  • tratarse de = to have to do with, to make mention of (someone / something)
  • salir de = to leave from (somewhere)
  • llenar de = to fill up with (something)
  • pintar de = to paint (something a certain color)
  • vestir(se) de = to dress in (a type of fabric, a specific color, a style of clothing)

These (I think) are the most common ones. There are a few with por but those can be a bit confusing since, like a, sometimes por is necessary without meaning something separate but…

  • preguntar por = to ask about (someone / something)
  • votar por = to vote for (someone / something)
  • luchar por = to fight for (someone / something)
  • cambiar por = to exchange (someone / something) for (someone / something)
  • jurar por = to swear by (someone / something)
  • rezar por = to pray for (something / someone)
  • molestarse por = to fuss over, to worry about (someone / something)
  • disculparse por = to apologize for (someone / something)

Links that might help:

anonymous asked:

Hi! When do you use "a" after Spanish verbs? Do I just have to learn them, or is there some rule? Thank you

There are times when the a is a personal a. That just means that your direct object is a person.

Such as golpear a alguien means “to hit someone”, while golpear la mesa “to hit the table” carries no a because la mesa is inanimate. 

People also use a specifically with indirect objects to make it clear who the subject is. So le mando la carta (a mi madre) “I’m sending the letter (specifically to my mother)”. This is more common for the le or les which can be any 3rd person subject. 

I could say a él le gusta “he likes it” or a ella le gusta “she likes it” to be specific if there’s a question of who “likes” whatever.


Other than that, there are just some verbs that take an a like jugar a means “to play (a sport/game)” or dedicarse a means “to dedicate oneself to” or volver a hacer algo “to do something again”.

The most common ones I can think of are:

  • jugar a + noun = to play (something; often sports or some type of game)
  • dedicarse a = to dedicate oneself to (something)
  • querer a (alguien) = to love (someone)
  • amar a (alguien) = to love (someone)
  • ayudar a (alguien / infinitivo) = to help (someone) / to help to (do something)
  • conocer a (alguien) = to meet/to know someone
  • llegar a = to lead to (something)
  • acostumbrarse a = to get used to (something)
  • atreverse a + infinitive = to dare to (do something)
  • ir a + infinitive = __ will do (something)
  • comenzar a + infinitive = to begin (to do something)
  • empezar a + infinitive = to begin (to do something)
  • obligar a + infinitive = to obligate (someone) to (do something)
  • volver a + infinitive = to (do something) again
  • oler a + object = to smell like (something)
  • saber a + object = to taste like (something)
  • sonar a + object = to sound like (something)
  • parecerse a = to look like (someone / something)
  • ser parecido/a a = to look like (someone / something)
  • esperar a que + subjunctive = to await (something happening)

Some of these are personal ones - a alguien - some are not. 

There are also verbs that might use en, de, con, por/para as their preposition. Many times you just have to remember them because the really common ones stand out like empezar/comenzar a or ir + a + infinitive.


Links that might help:

anonymous asked:

How do you know when to use "a" like in "bañar a alguien" or "jugar a un juego"?

In most cases, the a like bañar a alguien means it’s a “personal a”.

This means that verbs whose object is a person or multiple people or animate objects have an a right before it to make sure you know it’s a person (or a pet, or a personified object, or sometimes a country).

The following examples I’m listing with a alguien ”someone”, but you can substitute a name or a person if you want:

conocer a alguien = to know someone / to meet someone
hacer daño a alguien = to hurt someone
querer a alguien = to like someone / to love someone
amar a alguien = to love someone [stronger than querer]
saludar a alguien = to greet someone / to say hello to someone
buscar a alguien = to look for someone
extrañar a alguien / echar de menos a alguien = to miss someone
golpear a alguien = to hit someone
patear a alguien = to kick someone
besar a alguien = to kiss someone
abrazar a alguien = to hug someone
dar de comer al perro = to feed the dog
matar a alguien = to kill someone
dar a luz (a un/una bebé) = to give birth (to a baby)

The personal a marks that the object [person receiving an action] is a person or someone treated as such. So the a recognizes their personhood or… their state of not being an inanimate object.


In the context of jugar it’s just a verb that takes an a as its preposition. There are some verbs that do that, for whatever reason.

jugar al fútbol = to play football / soccer
jugar al tenís = to play tennis
jugar al baloncesto = to play basketball
jugar al voleibol = to play volleyball 
jugar al béisbol = to play baseball
jugar a (los) naipes = to play cards
jugar al ajedrez = to play chess
jugar al dado = to gamble / to play games of chance [el dado is a singular “die”; los dados being “dice”]
jugar a un videojuego = to play a video game

That’s just a thing that jugar does. It takes an a 

Other verbs that take a include…

[copied from a different ask]

  • jugar a + noun = to play (something; often sports or some type of game)
  • dedicarse a = to dedicate oneself to (something)
  • querer a (alguien) = to love (someone)
  • amar a (alguien) = to love (someone)
  • ayudar a (alguien / infinitivo) = to help (someone) / to help to (do something)
  • conocer a (alguien) = to meet/to know someone
  • llegar a = to lead to (something)
  • acostumbrarse a = to get used to (something)
  • atreverse a + infinitive = to dare to (do something)
  • ir a + infinitive = __ will do (something)
  • comenzar a + infinitive = to begin (to do something)
  • empezar a + infinitive = to begin (to do something)
  • obligar a + infinitive = to obligate (someone) to (do something)
  • volver a + infinitive = to (do something) again
  • oler a + object = to smell like (something)
  • saber a + object = to taste like (something)
  • sonar a + object = to sound like (something)
  • parecerse a = to look like (someone / something)
  • ser parecido/a a = to look like (someone / something)
  • esperar a que + subjunctive = to await (something happening)


I should point out that the alguien doesn’t ALWAYS take an a …because some verbs take other prepositions; con, de, por, para, en

So here’s the post on verbs that take prepositions because it doesn’t often translate well, it’s just a thing that Spanish does