a shahs life

Rick Riordan The Ship of the Dead Tour Information!

Here’s some stuff I learned at the Rick Riordan tour stop:

  • @viria‘s art was in the powerpoint and it was so beautiful, bless it 
  • Mallory Keen backstory in Ship of the Dead
  • Hearthstone is going back to see his father in Ship of the Dead
  • (he didn’t say too much about the book tbh)
  • Aru Shah and The End of Time by Roshani Chokshi: March 27, 2018 (she was at my tour stop and someone in the audience got an arc of the book; lowkey jelly)
  • New Kane Chronicles book (like Camp Half Blood Chronicles): May 2018
  • Trials of Apollo: The Burning Maze: May 1, 2018
    • He officially announced that Piper and Jason will make a return in this book
    • Also, all of the characters from HoO will show up at some point in ToA
  • The Storm Runner by Jennifer Cervanten: Fall 2018
  • The Dragon Pearl by Yoon Ha Lee: Fall 2018
  • The Magnus Chase Coloring Book: August 14, 2018
  • HE ADDRESSED THE LIGHTNING THIEF MUSICAL AND I WAS LIVING MY LIFE
    • He did say he hasn’t listened to it though, saying that like the movies and the audiobooks, he finds it weird to listen to his own writing
  • The Lightning Thief Illustrated Edition: August 14, 2018
  • New updated website at readriordan.com: fully updated by October 17th
    • There will be a “Who’s your godly parent?” quiz 
  • Bonus: He also directly mentioned college students reading his books, saying he plans on sticking to middle grade writing, but he appreciates us still reading the books if we want!
  • Also, he does like falafel.

hi everyone here is a tidy list of all the penumbra fic ive written because im a neurotic narcissist who likes lists & now its all in one spot for your reading enjoyment! cool cool, cool cool cool

a blessing or a bruise: that obligatory non-canonical reconciliation fic, 11k

walk light down the wires: rita & juno, 18k (most recent!)

live like an outlaw: peter post final resting place, 8k

spoken, snarled, sworn: juno & family, 4k

a little series… juno vs. peter nureyev’s aliases

& my favorite… an arrow to prove a point: the man, the myth, the master thief. 9k

Uddey naal yaari kadey naa layiye
Jinhu aapne uttey garoor hove
Maa baap nu bura kadey naa aakhiye
Bhaave lakh unha daa kasoor hove
Bure raaste kadey naa jaayiye
Bhaave manzil kinhee vee door hove
Raah jaande nu dil naa diyaiye
Bhaave lakh udhey mukh te noor hove
Par ‘Bulleh Shah’ mohabbatan uthey paayiye
Jithe pyaar nibhaayun da dastoor hove
—  Bulleh Shah
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Whatever moves you, whatever urges you to create, to build, whatever keeps you from failing, whatever helps you survive, is perhaps the oldest and the simplest emotion known to mankind, and that is LOVE.

Ashton and Calum falling asleep after an all nighter movie marathon and Michael and Luke can’t go to sleep so they start making out a lil until Ashton starts to fuss around a bit because luke starts kissing down Michaels neck and he can’t help but to moan when the larger boy sucks on his collar bone

My father always had a tale at hand to divert our attention, or to use as a way of transmitting an idea or a thought. He used to say that the great collections of stories from the East were like encyclopedias, storehouses of wisdom and knowledge ready to be studied, to be appreciated and cherished. To him, stories represented much more than mere entertainment. He saw them as complex psychological documents, forming a body of knowledge that had been collected and refined since the dawn of humanity and, more often than not, passed down by word of mouth.

When he died a decade ago, I inherited my father’s library. There were five reinforced boxes labelled STORIES: VALUABLE, HANDLE WITH CARE. Among them were Aesop’s Fables, Hans Christian Andersen, and the Brothers Grimm. There were many others, too, on the Arab collections, and volumes of tales from every corner of the world – from Albania and China, Cambodia, India, Argentina and Vietnam, from sub-Saharan Africa, Australia, Malaysia, from Papua New Guinea and Japan.

Once the Caliph’s House was renovated I had more time to spare. So I sat down to read the five boxes of stories from my father’s library. I would often come to pencilled annotations in his small, neat hand. Many of the notes hinted at wisdom locked within a tale, or likened one story to another from an entirely different region of the world.

The only set of volumes missing was my father’s copy of A THOUSAND AND ONE NIGHTS, the rare edition translated by the Victorian scholar and explorer Richard Francis Burton. As a child I remember seeing the set in his study. It stood on a shelf at ankle height. My father prized the edition very highly, and would point out the quality of the workmanship, or tell of how he came upon the seventeen volumes as a young man. He said that he had saved for months to afford the books and would go each afternoon to spend time admiring them in the shop. I realized later it was the prized first ‘Benares’ edition of Burton’s ALF LAYLA WA LAYLA, A THOUSAND AND ONE NIGHTS.

The volumes were bound in waxy black cloth, with bright gold lettering on the spines. I was young and inexperienced, but they were just about the most beautiful thing I had ever seen. They were so exquisite that I would stroke my fingers over them and stoop down to smell their scent.

They smelled like cloves.

One rainy afternoon a visitor arrived at my parents’ home. He was overweight, flat-footed, and chain-smoked from the moment he stepped inside until the moment he stepped out. I was too small to be told anything, but I remember my parents muttering before he came. I don’t know who he was, but he was important enough to drink tea from our best china and to have slices of lemon served on the side.

From behind the banisters, I watched him greet my father and move through the hall into the study. The door closed behind them and, when it was eventually opened, the visitor was struggling under the weight of the ARABIAN NIGHTS. At dinner, I asked what had happened to the black and gold books.

My father’s face seemed to darken. He looked at me hard, and said: ‘In our culture a guest is respected and honoured very greatly, Tahir Jan. If he is under your roof, then he is under your protection. Your possessions are his for the asking. If he was to admire something, it is your duty to present him with it. Remember this, Tahir Jan, remember it for your entire life.’

Tahir Shah writing about his father in his book IN ARABIAN NIGHTS.