a separation movie

8

Glory Days Films (part 1 of 2)

Shizune went to go see the new animated Haikyuu movie!  Her random draw acrylic standee was Hinata!

The girls who sat next to her in the theater were cheering and moving about and she started to feel like they were almost cheering for her and her team.  She felt like the Team Manager while watching.  ^_^

(x

In which somehow they got their hands on a functioning old world TV and vhs or dvds and Furiosa is totally not buying this horror movie at all, NOPE she’s just being considerate to Max who clearly is the distressed one. Max is not going to argue.

Number 12 for Prompts.

“We don’t share clothes” “Please dont make assumptions” “Very separately single” These bitches better be trippin. 😂

2

Films by or about people of colour directed by women*

Some notes on the list:

  • This list is non-exhaustive.
  • The movies I counted as “starring” poc of colour have at least 1 poc as lead or co-lead.
  • I respect the fact that some people do not want to see movies about poc as told by white women and have separated these movies accordingly.
  • Some of the directors who are woc who have directed the movies starring woc are not the same race as their casts.
  • What counts as a woc in the western world is not what is necessarily counted as a woc in the countries that those women are from. I have created my international list based on my own western perspective.

Directed by American WOC starring POC

Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash)
Mississippi Masala (Mira Nair)
I Like It Like That (Darnell Martin)
Eve’s Bayou (Kasi Lemmons)
Girlfight (Karyn Kusama)
Love and Basketball (Gina Prince-Blythewood)
Real Women Have Curves (Patricia Cardoso)
Saving Face (Alice Wu)
Something New (Sanaa Hamri)
Mississippi Damned (Tina Mabry)
I Will Follow (Ava DuVernay)
Pariah (Dee Rees)
Yelling to the Sky (Victoria Mahoney)
Middle of Nowhere (Ava DuVernay)
Mosquita y Mari (Aurora Guerrero)
Peeples (Tina Gordon Chism)
Selma (Ava DuVernay)
13th (Ava DuVernay)
Losing Ground (Kathleen Collins)
Appropriate Behavior (Desiree Akhavan)
Farah Goes Bang (Meera Menon)
It’s Already Tomorrow in Hong Kong (Emily Ting)
Songs My Brothers Taught Me (Chloe Zhao)

Directed by WOC starring white people
The Republic of Love (Deepa Mehta)
D.E.B.S. (Angela Robinson)
Vanity Fair (Mira Nair)
Jennifer’s Body (Karyn Kusama)
Last Night (Massy Tadjedin)
The Invitation (Karyn Kusama)
Equity (Meera Menon)
Shake It (Hella Joof)

International WOC
Sugar Cane Alley (Euzhan Palcy) Martinique
Salaam Bombay! (Mira Nair) India
Double Happiness (Mina Schum) Canada
Fire (Deepa Mehta) Canada/India
Earth (Deepa Mehta) Canada/India
Monsoon Wedding (Mira Nair) India
Bollywood/Hollywood (Deepa Mehta) Canada
Bend it like Beckham (Gurinder Chada) UK
Water (Deepa Mehta) Canada/India
Persepolis (Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud) France
Heaven on Earth (Deepa Mehta) Canada
Belle (Amma Asante) UK
The Second Mother (Anna Muylaert) Brazil
A Simple Life (Ann Hui) Hong Kong
Wadjda (Haifaa al-Mansour) Saudi Arabia
Dil Dhankande Do (Zoya Akhtar) India
Still the Water (Naomi Kawase) Japan
Sweet Bean (Naomi Kawase) Japan
Blackboards (Samira Makhmalbaf) Iran
At Five in the Afternoon (Samira Makhmabaf) Iran

Directed by white women starring POC
Portrait of Jason (Shirley Clarke) documentary
Black Panthers (Agnès Varda) documentary
Paris is Burning (Jennie Livingston) documentary
S'en fout la mort (Claire Denis)
Mi Vida Loca (Allison Anders)
Whale Rider (Niki Caro)
Frida (Julie Taymor)
Itty Bitty Titty Committee (Jamie Babbit)
Things We Lost in the Fire (Susanne Bier)
35 Rhums (Claire Denis)
The Wedding Song (Karin Albou)
2 Days in New York (Julie Delpy)
Girlhood (Céline Sciamma)
Honeytrap (Rebecca Johnson)
The Fits (Anna Rose Holmer)
Wuthering Heights (Andrea Arnold)
American Honey (Andrea Arnold)
Ayanda (Sara Blecher)

*I know people will want to add onto the list and I appreciate that, but before you do please check whether a film is directed by a woman. This blog and list is in support of women directed or co-directed films. Please respect that. 

i don’t think i’m gnna feel good about the state of bal and huma until i know for sure that d3 won’t screw up the pre-built up relationships, because the way it feels like it’s being pushed right now in the media due to the actors’ irl relationship is making me #stressed

also if there’s a love triangle, ever, i’m peace-ing out LMAO

10

Favorite Performance in BIOPIC movies

  • Robert Downey Jr. as Charlie Chaplin (Chaplin 1992)
  • Joaquin Phoenix as Johnny Cash (Walk The Line, 2005)
  • Phillip Seymour Hoffman as Truman Capote (Capote, 2005)
  • Meryl Streep as Julia Child (Julie & Julia, 2009)
  • Salma Hayek as Frida Kahlo (Frida, 2002)
  • Angelina Jolie as Mariane Pearl (A Mighty Heart, 2007)
  • Jesse Eisenberg as Mark Zuckerberg (The Social Network, 2010)
  • Will Smith as Muhammad Ali (Ali, 2001)
  • Colin Firth as King George VI (The King’s Speech, 2010)
  • Cate Blanchett as Bob Dylan (I’m Not There, 2007)
Rebecca's Guide to Starting Star Trek

Holy Representation, Batman! You may have just heard that Star Trek Discovery is happening and it has a black woman as the lead, and Asian woman as the captain, and a confirmed interracial/interspecies gay couple, and you’re gunna watch!

Perhaps you want to start Star Trek now, but shit, there’s 13 movies, seven separate tv shows, all ranging somewhere between 3-7 seasons of 45 min episodes, plus there’s all those comics and novels.

First of all, if you don’t want to do anything other than Discovery, THAT IS 1701% OK. DO NOT LET GATE KEEPING BULLSHIT KEEP YOU FROM ENJOYING THINGS.

But if you do want to start, here’s my recommendations. Other people may have their opinions, but here’s mine.

Start with the movies, sorta. It’s much easier to get through all the movies than all the seasons. But, I say sorta, because don’t actually watch Star Trek: The Motion Picture. The first movie is just, well, it’s not great, and there isn’t enough plot to justify sitting through it. One day, for kicks and giggles, go back and watch, but for now, leave it alone.

What you’re gunna do is replace the first Star Trek movie with a few episodes of The Original Series (TOS).

You’re gunna do:

Space Speed (Season 1, ep 22)

City on the Edge of Forever (season 1, ep 28)

Amok Time (Season 2, ep 1)

Journey to Babel (Season 2, ep 10)

If you wanna toss one out to get to the movies faster, City on the Edge of Forever isn’t like, super plot important, but it’s generally considered one of the best episodes of all the series, and I think it’s really good for understanding characterization.

THEN START THE MOVIES

You’re gunna watch 2-6, and then I’d recommend pausing. You can just keep going, but I’m gunna suggest a few The Next Generation (TNG) episodes first before you move onto movies 7-10.

Q Who (Season 2, ep 16)

Best of Both Worlds part 1&2 (Season 3, ep 26, Season 4, ep 1)

Chain of Command part 1&2 (Season 6, ep 10-11)

The last one is similar to The City on The Edge of Forever. I think one more is best for understanding the characters moving forward, and this is a great ep for that, also it does my favorite Star Trek thing, which is discuss reverent political issues (use of torture in this case) while also getting you acquainted with the Cardassians, who will be around more in Deep Space Nine (DS9). But if you’re eager to get back to the movies, go ahead with the rest of the movies.

Movies 7-10 are all with the TNG cast, and then 11-13 are all the alternate Kelvin timeline (AOS).

Woo! At this point, you should feel much more aquatinted with this universe.

Now if you still want to watch more of the TV series, honestly, this may be controversial, but you can just watch whichever one strikes your fancy. The stories usually hold on their own, and one crew my be more interesting to you than another.

The Original Series and The Animated Series are the same crew, just one is animated.

From having watched the movies, you should have already met The Next Generation crew and should be able to tell if you want to see more of their adventures.

Deep Space Nine is not actually about a ship, but rather a base. This is the first time the captain was not a white man. Benjamin Cisco is played by Avery Brooks, a black man. Also, his first officer is a Bajoran (an alien) woman. This one also had the closest to the occasional LGBT+ rep with Jadzia Dax, an alien that is gender fluid and changes gender based on their host. It’s not perfect, but it’s at least not the regular cisgender heteronormative character we’re used to. Both Worf and O'Brein from TNG are in this series.

Voyager is about a ship that gets put 75 years away from Federation space and is about their adventures on their journey home. This features the first female captain, played by Kate Mulgrew from Orange is the New Black. It also has a Native American first officer, and a black Vulcan (not the first ever seen, but the first one as a main character), a half Klingon/human woman as the engineer, and later on in season 4, a former Borg assimilated woman. There’s even more than I’ve mentioned here actually, diversity wise. Other than Discovery, this is easily their most multicultural Bridge.

Enterprise is a prequel series that follows the crew of the Enterprise 100 years before Kirk took command. It’s, much less diverse to be honest. There’s a lot I like about it, and tbh I’m always a little Gay for T'Pol (Vulcan Sub-commander) but there’s a lot of white dudes, so if you’re looking for diversity, this…. may not be your jam.


Later, I’ll do a follow up post that has abridged recommendations for each series, because if I’m being totally honest, there’s really some episodes you can skip.

For now, this is my starting point for everyone.

ENJOY!