a raisin in the sun

buzzfeed.com
70 Classic Black Films Everyone Should See At Least Once
♬ "Do you know where you're going to?"♬ Here are 70 of the most iconic black films, through the year 2000.
By Kelley L. Carter

this list ignores the last 15 years of movies, but that makes sense. if we’re going to talk about “classics”, we have to give the movies time to become classics.

legend ( italicized - seen it, bold- have a copy of it too)

  1. Carmen Jones (1954)
  2. Imitation of Life (1959)
  3. Raisin in the Sun (1961)
  4. Shaft (1971)
  5. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971)
  6. Super Fly (1972)
  7. Lady Sings the Blues (1972)
  8. The Mack (1973)
  9. Coffy (1973)
  10. Black Caesar (1973)
  11. Cleopatra Jones (1974)
  12. Foxy Brown (1974)
  13. Claudine (1974)
  14. Uptown Saturday Night (1974)
  15. Cornbread, Earl and Me (1975)
  16. Dolemite (1975)
  17. Cooley High (1975)
  18. Mahogany (1975)
  19. Sparkle (1976)
  20. Car Wash (1976)
  21. The Wiz (1978)
  22. Breakin’ (1984)
  23. Beat Street (1984)
  24. A Soldier’s Story (1984)
  25. Purple Rain (1984)
  26. Krush Groove (1985)
  27. The Color Purple (1985)
  28. Hollywood Shuffle (1987)
  29. Raw (1987)
  30. School Daze (1988)
  31. Coming to America (1988)
  32. Lean On Me (1989)
  33. Glory (1989)
  34. Do the Right Thing (1989)
  35. Harlem Nights (1989)
  36. Mo’ Better Blues (1989)
  37. House Party (1990)
  38. The Five Heartbeats (1991)
  39. Jungle Fever (1991)
  40. Strictly Business (1991)
  41. Boyz n the Hood (1991)
  42. New Jack City (1991)
  43. White Men Can’t Jump (1992)
  44. Bebe’s Kids (1992) (used to have this on VHS lol)
  45. Boomerang (1992)
  46. Malcolm X (1992)
  47. Juice (1992)
  48. Class Act (1992)
  49. What’s Love Got to Do With It (1993)
  50. CB4 (1993)
  51. Posse (1993)
  52. Poetic Justice (1993)
  53. Menace II Society (1993)
  54. Jason’s Lyric (1994)
  55. A Low Down Dirty Shame (1994)
  56. Tales From the Hood (1995)
  57. Bad Boys (1995)
  58. Friday (1995)
  59. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
  60. Higher Learning (1995)
  61. Set It Off (1996)
  62. Hav Plenty (1998)
  63. Eve’s Bayou (1997)
  64. Love Jones (1997)
  65. Soul Food (1997)
  66. Belly (1998)
  67. How Stella Got Her Groove Back (1998)
  68. The Best Man (1999)
  69. The Wood (1999)
  70. Love & Basketball (2000)

of course she couldn’t get ALL of the movies on here… but some notable misses :

  • The Temptations (1998)
  • Why Do Fools Fall In Love (1998)
  • Dead Presidents (1995)
  • Polly (1989)
  • A Hero Ain’t Nothing But A Sandwich (1978)
  • The Marva Collins Story (1981)
  • Sister Act II (1993)
  • Hoodlum (1997)
  • Women of Brewster Place (1989) 
  • Little Richard (2000)
  • Bamboozled (2000)
  • I’m Gonna Git You Sucka (1988)
  • The Jacksons: An American Dream (1992)
  • Introducing Dorothy Dandridge (1999)
  • Preacher’s Wife (1996)
  • The Bodyguard (1992)
  • Mo Money (1992) (ok maybe not so notable, but yeah)
  • Blankman (1994)
  • The 6th Man (1997)
50 book asks
  • the adventures of huckleberry finn: do you think kids or their parents are responsible for their beliefs?
  • the alchemist: what are your current plans for the future? will you be upset if they don't work out?
  • alice's adventures in wonderland: how do you react to absurd situations?
  • and then there were none: do you think murderers deserve to die?
  • artemis fowl: how much do you depend on technology?
  • beowulf: is it always worthwhile to hear both sides of an argument?
  • the canterbury tales: if someone is hypocritical, do you point it out?
  • cat's cradle: do you think it's better to believe a lie than to live with an unpleasant truth?
  • charlotte's web: what's your favorite art form?
  • coraline: if you could change your family, what would you change?
  • the crucible: how heavily do you depend on others when forming opinions?
  • fahrenheit 451: do you think there's any knowledge that should be kept secret?
  • the fault in our stars: if you could have one conversation before you died, who would you talk to and what would you say?
  • flowers for algernon: how much potential do you think you have?
  • frankenstein: is it wise for humans to attempt to create life?
  • the giver: talk about a favorite memory
  • the great gatsby: what would you sacrifice for money?
  • harry potter: if you could bring someone back from the dead, would you? if so, who would it be?
  • the hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy: what do you think is the meaning of life?
  • the hobbit: do you think the average person has the potential to be a hero?
  • holes: if someone poor stole from someone rich, who would you sympathize with?
  • howl's moving castle: how quickly do you form opinions about other people?
  • the hunger games: would you kill someone if they planned to kill you?
  • identical: how clear is your perception of reality?
  • the importance of being earnest: are you flattered or annoyed by gentlemanly behavior?
  • inferno: do you think you belong in hell? why or why not?
  • jonathan livingston seagull: is perfection a good goal?
  • the joy luck club: describe your family
  • jurassic park: do you think it's wrong to use animals as attractions and accessories?
  • the kite runner: if you could, what social issue would you spread awareness about?
  • les misérables: do you think people should revolt if the government is corrupt?
  • life of pi: if you were stranded, would you be able to take care of yourself?
  • the lightning thief: what would you be the god/goddess of?
  • the lion, the witch, and the wardrobe: if you could start a new life in a new world, would you?
  • lord of the flies: what motivates you best?
  • lord of the rings: is it important to work for the greater good of the world?
  • of mice and men: would you kill your closest friend to save them from a worse fate?
  • the perks of being a wallflower: does listening to other people's problems help you or weigh you down?
  • the phantom of the opera: how much do you judge others on physical appearance?
  • pride and prejudice: are you romantic?
  • the princess bride: what's your best feature?
  • a raisin in the sun: what is your most important possession?
  • romeo and juliet: have you ever done anything ridiculous for love? what?
  • stargirl: do you value uniqueness?
  • the taming of the shrew: would you be willing to be in a relationship with someone who is very dominant?
  • the tell-tale heart: is there anything you feel guilty about right now? what?
  • to kill a mockingbird: do you believe something has value simply because it's beautiful?
  • twilight: how consistent are your feelings about people close to you?
  • watership down: do you think your right to life is any greater than an animal's?
  • the westing game: if you died now, what would you want to happen to your possessions?

Born in 1930, Lorraine Hansberry was a writer and activist. With her play “Raisin in the Sun” Hansberry, at the age of 29, became the first black woman to have a play on Broadway. The play, which is considered an American classic and has been translated into 35 languages, almost didn’t make it to Broadway as investors were worried that the story of a black family would be a risky investment and not “universal enough” (something that was argued about in reviews at the time, and still an issue minority playwrights contend with). Prescient in the breadth and depth of it’s themes, the play ushered in a new black audience to Broadway and black artists. Other work includes “The Sign in Sidney Brustein’s Window” and “Les Blancs” published posthumously. A collection of her writing is “To Be Young, Gifted and Black: Lorraine Hansberry in Her Own Words,” which is also an Off-Broadway play. Hansberry died at the age of 34. For more information on her life and work, visit The Lorraine Hansberry Literary Trust.

Harlem
 
What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore–
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over–
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?

- Langston Hughes (died: 22 May 1967)

Child, when do you think is the time to love somebody the most; when they done good and made things easy for everybody? Well then, you ain’t through learning — because that ain’t the time at all. It’s when he’s at his lowest and can’t believe in hisself ‘cause the world done whipped him so. When you starts measuring somebody, measure him right, child, measure him right. Make sure you done taken into account what hills and valleys he come through before he got to wherever he is.
—  Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun