a movie to rule them all

Tagged by: @ohroses ty🌹

Rules: tag 9 people you want to get to know better

Relationship status: waiting for a rich + good looking guy to fall in love with me and give me all his assets jumin han im sorry im a gold digger

Lipstick or chapstick: lipstick!!

Last Movie I Watched: train to busan (it was so depressing…i’ll never get over it)

Last song you listened to: i will go to you like the first snow-ailee (the goblin soundtrack😢)

Top 3 shows: the office, ezel, valid love (i think i watched all of them at least 3 times OTL)

Top 3 characters: meiko inoue (solanin) ayumi yamada (honey and clover) haruno sakura (naruto)

Tagging: @sestets @sulliemeadows @hasbeenlokid @hakkei @velvetblush  @didem-dg @attoliattolis @heavenisalongroadhome @chodingjunior

Shark Emoji Review

A big friendly shark with an adorable shine in their eye! Traditional colors, possibly a great white? Looks like they’re about to ask you how you’ve been and give you a hug. 10/10

Looks like a meany, but is a tough guy with a heart of gold. Pretty shade of blues, like a blue shark! Not as detailed as Apple, but still ready to do business. Will beat up anyone who hurts you and give you a kiss. 10/10

A bold lil fella (pun intended) who ends up getting into pretty risky situations! Cute face of shock, yet curiosity and wonder. Very simple look of a not-so-simple great white. A good baby. 10/10

Don’t confuse this one for a dolphin! This is a shark through and through! Has the curious and gentle face of a thresher, yet no long tail. That doesn’t stop them! I support them. 10/10

Apple’s smaller, and not as detailed, sibling. That isn’t anything bad! Gentle colors and a tiny face to support such a cute shark. Most likely also has a Facebook and posts how much they love their friends. 10/10

Big and shy pal. What has you so sad? Could really use a hug. But, when they hug back, it feels like hugging a teddy bear! An ambigious shark. Cute color that fits their character. 10/10 (+a hug)

Looks like they just took a picture of a random great white. What a beautiful picture though! Looking good! 10/10

Dude with an attitude. A beautiful and confident smile that could draw in anyone. Their dream is to one day have a motorcycle gang and rule the sea. No one tell them it’s hard to ride a motorcycle with fins. 10/10 (+wishes for the best)

Ahh!!! Scared you, didn’t they? Looks like they look up to Jaws! A big fella with cute lil eyes and gleaming teeth. Wants to be a big movie star someday, practicing their moves for their Jaws-not-a-ripoff movie. Bet they will do great! 10/10

Complains: Not enough sharks. That’s it. They’re all beautiful.

4

Many that live deserve death. Some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them, Frodo? Do not be too eager to deal out death in judgment. Even the very wise cannot see all ends. My heart tells me that Gollum has some part to play yet, for good or ill before this is over. The pity of Bilbo may rule the fate of many.

A white guy’s thoughts on “Get Out” and racism

This weekend, I went to see a horror movie. It got stuck in my head, and now I can’t stop thinking about it—but not for any of the reasons you might think.

The movie was Jordan Peele’s new hit Get Out, which has gotten rave reviews from critics—an incredible 99% on Rotten Tomatoes—and has a lot of people talking about its themes.

First of all, I should tell you that I hate horror movies. As a general rule, I stay far, far away from them, but after everything I’d read, I felt like this was an important film for me to see. This trailer might give you some inkling as to why:

Creepy, huh? You might know writer/director Jordan Peele as part of the comedy duo Key & Peele, known for smartly tackling societal issues through sketch comedy. Get Out is a horror movie, but it’s also a film about race in America, and it’s impressively multilayered.

I left the theater feeling deeply disturbed but glad this movie was made. I can’t say any more without revealing spoilers, so if you haven’t seen the movie yet and you don’t want to have the plot spoiled for you, stop reading now and come back later.

Seriously, this is your last chance before I give away what happens.

Okay, you were warned. Here we go.

Our protagonist is Chris Washington, a young black man who has been dating Rose Armitage, a young white woman, for the last four months. She wants him to meet her family, but he’s hesitant. She acknowledges that her dad can be a little awkward on the subject of race, but assures Chris that he means well.

After unnerving encounters with a deer (echoes of The Invitation) and a racist cop, Chris and Rose arrive at the Armitages’ estate. On the surface, the Armitages are very friendly, but the conversation (brilliantly scripted by Peele) includes a lot of the little, everyday, get-under-your-skin moments of racism that people of color have to contend with: Rose’s dad going on about how he voted for Obama, for instance, and asking how long “this thang” has been going on. Chris laughs it off to be polite, though he clearly feels uncomfortable.

There’s a fantastic moment here, by the way, when Rose’s dad offhandedly mentions that they had to close off the basement because of “black mold.” In the midst of the racially charged atmosphere of the conversation, it’s nearly impossible not to take this as a racial remark, and Chris certainly notices, but what could he possibly say about it? Black mold is a real thing; his girlfriend would surely think he was crazy and oversensitive if he said it sounded racist. Chris never reacts to the remark, but that one tiny moment is a reminder to the audience of a real problem people of color often face, when racism can’t be called out without being accused of “playing the race card” or seeing things that aren’t there. (Incidentally, it turns out that the basement is actually used for molding of a different sort.)

There are other reasons for Chris to be unsettled: The only other black people on the estate are two servants, Georgina and Walter (Rose’s dad says he knows how bad it looks, but that it’s not what it seems), and something is clearly “off” about them. Later, more white people show up—and one more black character, and he, too, feels “off.”

By the end of the film, we learn the horrible secret: Rose’s family is kidnapping and luring black people to their estate, where they’re being hypnotized and psychologically trapped inside themselves—Rose’s mom calls it “the sunken place”—so that old or disabled white people’s consciousnesses can be transplanted into their bodies. The white people are then able to move about, controlling their new black bodies, with the black person’s consciousness along for the ride as a mere “passenger.” In a shocking twist, it turns out that even apparently-sweet Rose is in on the plot, and Chris must fight her and the rest of her family to escape.

This isn’t a “white people are evil” film, although it may sound that way at first, but it is a film about racism. I know many of my friends of color will connect with this movie in a way I can’t, so I won’t try to say what I think they’ll get out of it. I do want to say how I connected with it, though, because I think what Jordan Peele has done here is really important for white audiences. 

If you look beyond the surface horror-movie plot, this film actually gives white people a tiny peek at the reality of racism—not the epithet-shouting neo-Nazi kind of racism that white people normally imagine when we hear “racism,” but the “Oh it’s so nice to meet you; I voted for Obama” kind of racism, the subtle othering that expects people of color to smile and get along and adopt white culture as their own whenever they’re around white people.

So many of the moments in Get Out are clearly intended to work on multiple levels. When Chris confronts Georgina about something being wrong and she smiles and says, “No, no no no no no,” with tears streaming down her cheeks, the symbolism is blatant. How often do people of color have to ignore the subtle indignities they face and hide their true emotions in order to avoid coming across as, for example, “the angry black woman/man”? How many times do they find themselves in social situations—even with their closest white friends!—where people make little comments tying them to an “exotic,” supposedly monolithic culture, where they have to respond with a smile and a laugh instead of telling people how stupid and offensive they’re being? 

I can’t tell you the number of these stories I’ve heard from my friends, and I’m quite sure that the stories I’ve heard are only a tiny fraction of the stories that could be told. So there’s something in that moment that speaks volumes about the experiences of people of color in America.

The same is true for so many other moments. The black characters Chris meets at the Armitages’ have all symbolically given up their identities and conformed to white culture; when Chris meets one character, he turns out to be going under a new name, with new clothes and new mannerisms; when Chris offers him a fist bump, he tries to shake Chris’s fist. Again, within the story, there’s an explanation for all this, but every moment here is also about assimilation and culture differences. 

For me as a white audience member, all of these moments did something remarkable: They showed me my own culture—a culture I’m often blissfully unaware of because it’s all around me—as something alien. They reminded me that I, too, have a culture, and that expecting everyone else to assimilate to my culture is just as much an erasing of their identities as it would be to expect me to assimilate to someone else’s culture.

And that’s a big part of what Get Out is about—the erasing of identities, and the power of racism to destroy people. I think it’s really significant that racism is portrayed here very differently from how it’s normally portrayed in movies written by white people. In most Hollywood movies, you know a character is racist because they shout racial epithets or make blatant statements about a certain race’s inferiority. That allows white audiences to say, “I would never do/say that, so I’m not racist!” We really don’t want to think we are.

But notice something important about Get Out’s treatment of racism: This is a film about the literal enslavement of black people—racism doesn’t get more extreme than that—and yet Peele doesn’t go for the obvious by having the white characters admit that they think black people are inferior; instead, they subjugate and dehumanize people by claiming to admire things about them. They turn them into fashion accessories. 

When Chris asks why only black people are being targeted for this procedure, the response is telling: It’s not (supposedly) because the white characters think African Americans are bad, but rather, because they like certain things about them and they want “a change” for themselves. They want to become black—it’s trendy, we’re told!—but without having had any of the actual life experiences or history of African Americans. White people need to see this: to experience the ways in which Chris is othered by people who tell him all the things they like about him—isn’t he strong? Look at those muscles! Does he play golf like Tiger Woods? And he must be well-endowed and have such sexual prowess, right, Rose?

The white people in the audience need to be reminded that just because you’re saying positive things about someone doesn’t mean you’re not being racist, that turning someone into an exotic “other” may not be the same as shouting an epithet, but it’s still taking away someone’s identity and treating them as a commodity.

The film is filled with these kinds of moments. When we realize that Rose’s white grandmother has inhabited the body of Georgina, the fact that she keeps touching her own hair and admiring herself in the mirror takes on a whole new level of significance. (White people, please don’t ask to touch your black friends’ hair.) When Chris connects with a dying deer on the side of the road and later sees a deer head mounted on the wall at the Armitages’ estate, the symbolism is hard to miss. Black people are being turned into trophies in this house. And, oh yeah, they’re being literally auctioned off—as they were in real life in the not-too-distant past.

One day, I’d like to see the film again to pick up on all the ways things read differently the second time through. I noticed several things in retrospect that gain new significance once you know the ending, and I’m sure there’s a lot I didn’t notice. For example, Rose’s dad says he hired Walter and Georgina to care for his parents, and when his parents died, “I couldn’t bear to let them go.” The first time you see the film, it sounds like the “them” is Walter and Georgina. But in retrospect, it’s clear the “them” he couldn’t bear to let go was his parents, so he sacrificed Walter and Georgina for them. Which, again, is an example of how the supposed care of the white characters for the black characters (his care for Walter and Georgina, Rose’s care for Chris) is really all about caring for themselves and treating the black characters as completely interchangeable objects.

The message of the film isn’t simply that the black characters are “good” and the white characters are “bad.” There are presumably—hopefully—many good white people in the world of this film, and many others who wouldn’t do what the Armitages are doing but also probably wouldn’t believe Chris or make the effort to stop it. Peele’s mother and wife are both white, so he’s clearly not trying to paint all white people as villains. 

But I admit, as a white guy, I really, really wanted Rose to be good. I’ve been the white person in an interracial relationship introducing my black boyfriend to my family. I’ve been that. So I related to Rose, and I really wanted to believe that she was well-intentioned and just oblivious; even though she misses the mark on several occasions, there are times that she seems like she gets it and she really does listen to Chris. When a cop asks to see Chris’s ID early in the film even though he wasn’t driving, Rose stands up against the obvious racism, showing us all what it looks like for white people to do the right thing. “That was hot,” Chris says to her later, and I thought, yeah, that’s who I want to be.

So I have to admit, it was really upsetting to me to see Rose, the only good white character left in the film, turn out to be evil. But I realized that part of that is that I really wanted her to represent me, and that’s really the point. Just think how often horror films have only one black character who dies early on, and how many films of all genres have no significant black characters for audience members to look up to or identify with. I think it’s really important for white audiences to experience that.

As I’ve reflected on the film, it seems to me like there are three kinds of popular movies about people of color. There are those that feature POC characters that are essentially indistinguishable from the white characters—as if they just decided to cast Morgan Freeman instead of Tom Hanks without giving any thought to the character’s race. Then there are the movies that deal with racism, but in a way that allows white people to feel good about ourselves, because we’re not like the characters in the film. (This is especially true for movies about racism in the past; some of them are very important films, like Hidden Figures, which I loved, but we need to be aware that it’s still easy for white America to treat it as a feel-good film and think that we’re off the hook because we no longer have separate restrooms.) And finally, there are movies that focus more directly on the lives of people of color but tend to draw largely audiences of color; not many white people go see them, because we think they’re not “for us” (even though we assume films about white people are for everyone).

Get Out isn’t any of those. It’s drawing a broad audience but it’s not afraid to make white people uncomfortable. And if you can give me, a white guy, a chance to have even a momentary fraction of an experience of the real-life, modern-day, casual racism facing people of color in America, I think that’s a very good thing.

the Doctors as Homestuck classes

The aspect of the Doctor is obviously Time, and I really liked the idea that he would have a different class with each regeneration. Because that’s what regeneration is - you’re essentially the same person, just your appearance and attitude changes, so your aspect stays the same, you just interact with it in a different way.

These may not be 100% accurate, I haven’t watched all of Classic Who so I know some Doctors much better than the others.

1 - Thief. Stole the TARDIS and also two school teachers. Left his granddaughter on Earth and broke the TARDIS of another renegade Time Lord, the Monk (so stole their time-travelling abilities from them)

2 - Rouge. He had companions from different time periods, stealing them for their advantage. For example, he took an orphaned girl from the Victorian era and she ended up finding a new loving family in 2017

3 - Page. Starts with a lack of his aspect, being stuck on Earth, unable to fix the TARDIS to leave it for the longest time. Fixes it later and indulges in more awesome time shenanigans.

4 - Heir. Tom Baker has been the Doctor on screen for the longest time (7 years), he’s the icon of classic Who, embodying it in some way. Also he’s weird, like his wibbly-wobbly aspect.

5 - Mage. Mages suffer, and that’s what Peter Davison is really good for. He passes out in like, half of his episodes, if not more. Also during has era one of the most tragic deaths of a classic companion happened.

6 - Bard. The producers didn’t treat Colin Baker’s Doctor too well, so he became possibly the most unpopular Doctor. Although he’s redeemed in the books and audioplays. Also had an interesting dark side to him.

7 - Maid. He was really dark and had weird relationships with spacetime rules, sometimes really sticking to them, sometimes blatantly breaking them.

8 - Sylph. As the TV show was put on a 16-year-old hiatus, Paul Mcgann’s Doctor kept the fandom alive first in the TV movie and then in the countless audioplays.

9 - Seer. I feel like out of all the doctors, Christopher Eccleston’s was the best at “feeling” the time. Like in that scene from “The end of the world” when he was able to walk through the fast spinning fans. Or his speech in “Rose” about feeling the Earth spin under his feet.

10 - Prince. As the seasons evolved, Ten’s destructive intentions unraveled more and more, ending with “Doctor Victorious”. See “The Family of Blood” and “The Waters of Mars” when he literally went against the laws of time.

11 - Witch. The most time shenanigan inducing Doctor. Rewrote the laws of time on multiple occasions.

12 - Knight. Spent 4 billion years in the Confession dial for Clara and lost his vision protecting Bill. Nuff said.

INFPs are the ones who...

-Won’t break a class rule but would start a revolution
-Listen for hours, even when they know that person wouldn’t let them talk for five minutes
-Always look out for the misfits and the loners
-Do their English homework, “just for fun”
-Will wait up all night just to say good night to someone
-Remember the little things people tell them like their favorite book or their best memory
-Always say thank you to waiters and janitors
-Cry when the dog dies in movies
-Write their feelings out on paper before they can find the words in their mouths to explain them
-Sit in their rooms, late at night in the dark, crying silently because they don’t want to wake anyone up
-Who apologize to the person who ran into them
-Can never pretend that they don’t care because they’ll end up crying or angry

anonymous asked:

yo i haven't seen pd2 in like YEARS but yuuri and victor in your little drabble had me weak and i don't even know what kinda factor they play in the movie or if there's anything else you can give us but i'd love to see more of them because. yes @ them being all over each other in front of everyone when people have shit to do, i.e. important ruling a kingdom stuff

well, the dynamic between the queen and joe in the movies (can’t say much about the books bc it’s been years since i read one of them lmao) is that they’ve got a will they won’t they tension going on and literally the entire damn country ships them (the friggin bishop or…. whatever religious leader officiating the wedding was like “finally” when they did get married in pd2 lolol) and yea that’s probably what i’d be going for. but with a couple tweaks since a lot of details have been shifted around in this au to make it work better with the yoi cast lol


Viktor’s never seen anyone as stoic as Mr Katsuki before in his life. He runs a tight ship, getting all the other security officers into line and smartly suited up. He obsessively goes over every possible breach or flaw at every venue, even drawing up blueprints and maps of the buildings Viktor sets foot in just so he knows the weaknesses of each wall, the locations of each ventilation shaft. He knows the precise details of Viktor’s schedule down to the minute, coordinating with Lilia, his chief advisor and assistant, until everything around the King seems to flow like clockwork, the well-oiled cogs of a machine designed to protect his every step.

“Why are you doing this?” he asks Mr Katsuki once, a couple months into his tenure as chief of security, and Mr Katsuki only smiles a tight, brittle smile that doesn’t reach his calculating yet sparkling eyes.

“I wouldn’t be able to live with myself if you were hurt, Your Majesty,” he replies.

Viktor laughs at just how earnestly serious the man looks. “My life is in your hands already, Mr Katsuki. You might as well call me Viktor.”

There’s a little chink in Mr Katsuki’s armour at that when his cheeks flush visibly pink. “I don’t know if I could, Your Majesty,” he says, his voice quiet, soft, and Viktor immediately realises he’d do anything to see this sort of expression on the man’s face again.

Mr Katsuki is a reassuring shadow at his side, watchful yet protective. Viktor values his work and dedication. Admires his bravery and honour.

But he doesn’t fall in love, though, until one fateful afternoon when he’s leaving his motorcade and a gunman opens fire, and Mr Katsuki is on him in an instant, tackling him onto the asphalt and shielding him with his body. As his heartbeat rings loudly in his ears, Viktor looks up into the wide-eyed expression on his chief of security’s face, and realises that the man is genuinely terrified of losing him.

“Yuuri,” he breathes, reaching up for him. The light haloes Mr Katsuki, making him almost angelic. The noise and commotion fade away with each blink of Mr Katsuki’s long lashes, and then the world fades to white.

When Viktor wakes up, he is in a hospital bed, and Mr Katsuki – Yuuri – has fallen asleep with his fingers inches from Viktor’s own. 

Keep reading

The Outsiders (significant) relationships: Book vs Movie

Book Johnny and Dallas: u know u all want them to get married

Movie Johnny and Dallas: johNNY YOUR ONE TRUE LOVE IS DALLAS GO TO HIM, NOT PONYBOY

Book Pony and Johnny: bffs

Movie Pony and Johnny: hella more than bffs

Book Soda and Steve: we’re basically boyfriends who don’t have any book time

Movie Soda and Steve: we’re basically boyfriends who don’t have any screen time

Book Steve and Ponyboy: they break the ‘stick together’ rule like a hundred times

Movie Steve and Pony: they hugged but you can see the pain in pony’s eyes

Book Darry @ everyone: brotherly dad

Movie Darry @ everyone: hot single dad, orphan, has 6 kids, find him on Christian Mingle

anonymous asked:

I. Am. Not. A. Bank. For the love of god. I don't know what it is about a movie theater that screams "break all your big bills here!" but like clockwork every week around payday people bring these 100 dollar bills and completely wipe out my register within four transactions. Your ticket is 6.50. You sir, are an asshole. And I can't even turn them away because management has a stupid rule about always accepting cash, even when it empties my register and I need change six times in one shift.

Thinking about the time Scott broke his leg skateboarding, how his mom made him stay home for three days. 

On the first day, Stiles skipped school to keep him entertained. He brought Scott chips and comics and his favorite soda, sat with him on the couch and tried to distract him as he worried about the classes he was missing. They watched all the Die Hard movies and had a long discussion about Matt and McClane. Scott seemed to think they’d fallen in love, which Stiles thought was weird, it was the least romantic movie he’d seen.

The next day Stiles stayed at school and took extensive notes - way more than he usually bothered with - and asked the teachers for the classes he didn’t share with Scott about what was covered. Sped to Scott’s on his push bike as soon as the final bell rang and delivered it all with an exaggerated flourish. He rubbed his palm over his head with an abstracted twitch when Scott gave him the world’s sweetest ever smile. 

The third day, Stiles stayed at school half the day, but couldn’t stop thinking about Scott, so he traveled to Scott’s during PE – it was okay, Finstock didn’t remember his name anyway – and offered the notes he could with a shrug. He set about making Scott hot chocolate with marshmallows and getting Scott’s single still-functioning games console - that Nintendo Gamecube was gonna live forever – set up. 

“You could go back to school,” Scott pointed out with a laugh, when Stiles complained bitterly at his fourth loss within ten minutes.

Nah” Stiles replied with a roll of his head. “I mean, I will if you want me to?”

“No! No. You have no idea how much I appreciate this, dude.”

So Stiles stayed with Scott until Melissa came and sneaked in later that night to deliver notes he’d bought off Vernon Boyd. 

Scott was back at school the next day, on crutches. Stiles wrapped an arm around his middle and hooked Scott’s arm over his shoulder the moment he had to attempt the stairs. They were harassed by Jackson fucking Whittemore the entire day, called conjoined twins, tweedle dumb and tweedle dumber, buttcheeks one and two.

Stiles didn’t care, because the look Scott gave him when he arrived at his classroom at the end of final period was love, pure and simple. And he was pretty sure the look he gave in return was the same. 

haikyuu!! ot3+ week: spring edition is coming!

we are here to give you a head start!  join us in celebrating your favourite haikyuu!! poly ships with fan art, fan fiction, edits, headcanons, and more!  

  • ot3+ week will take place from may 1 - may 7!
  • anyone is allowed to participate!  you don’t need to ask, just join in.
  • all media is accepted!  fan art, fan fiction, graphics/gifs, videos, cosplay – anything!  mature content is allowed but please remember to tag all nsfw entries!!
  • •• that being said, we will not tolerate stolen works under any circumstances.

you can find more general information here!!

here are the prompts for the season!

  • may 1st - lust | spring has sprung | red
  • may 2nd - gluttony | flower in bloom | orange
  • may 3rd - greed | at camp | yellow
  • may 4th - sloth | movie marathon | green
  • may 5th - wrath | road trip | blue
  • may 6th - envy | any crossover/au | indigo
  • may 7th - pride | karaoke party | violet

you may take the prompts however you like, it is completely up to you!  there are no rules on how you want to interpret them.

Oh, sleepovers. Nothing is better than spending a night with your bestfriends overdosing on junk food, laying around in your most comfortable and embarrassing pajamas and watching five movies in a row. Sleepovers can either be extremely relaxing or hard to recover from, but they are so funny and irreplaceable that I personally think there should be an international Sleepover Night. 

Movies, obviously, are a must-be according to the Sleepover Bible (made up by me right now), but sometimes it can be hard to choose what to watch. I guess one of the best ways to decide is having a marathon or establishing a theme: you can watch the whole Harry Potter/Pirates of the Caribbean/Star Wars saga, go for a tv series like Friends or Grey’s Anatomy or follow a fil rouge that links together a few films.

What I’m proposing you today is one of my favourite themes: teen movies from 1990 to 2000. Beside being extremely funny and unmissable if you are a movie amateur, they definitely left a mark in the filmmaking history, defining a generation not so far in time from ours. They can also teach you something about style or pop culture, so you have no excuses left not to watch them!

JAWBREAKER (1999)

People worshipped them and cursed them, but everybody wanted to be them .

In Jawbreaker you have all the ingredients for a classic teen movie: a high school, a popular and mean clique of Queen Bees, a kind-hearted girl loved by everyone, a prom, hot guys - with the only exception that this is not a classic teen movie.

Jawbreaker is a dark comedy and (surprise!) it involves a kidnapping, a death and police investigations. Written and directed by David Stein, the movie revolves around the “Flawless Four” of Reagan High School, Los Angeles:  Courtney Shayne, Marcie Fox, Julie Freeman and Elizabeth Purr. They all rule the school with a terror regime, except for Liz. She is not as mean as her friends and makes no differences in relating with others - her beauty and honesty, then, make her the most loved and admired girl. 

Obviously, this generates jealousy in Courtney, Marcie and Julie, who decide to prank their friend on seventeenth birthday, by performing a fake kidnapping. They take her off guard early in the morning, binding her with ropes and pushing a jawbreaker candy into her mouth. The girls lock Elizabeth in the trunk of a car and drive towards the mall to celebrate their friend’s brithday with breakfast. However, once they open the trunk, the sight is definitely not what they expected it to be…

Jawbreaker is worth watching not only for the twisted, surprising plot and the iconic (and definitely realistic) language used by the girls, but also because it explores the dynamics of a group of girls with the voice of an outsider, Fern Mayo, who finds herself involved in the events against her will. This movie is gonna make you laugh, startle and maybe regret not living in 1999.

Cruel Intentions (1999)

In the game of seduction there’s only one rule: never fall in love.

Drugs, sex, a hot step-brother, games of seduction, classy and total black outfits, rich mansions. If you like this list, Cruel Intentions is the perfect movie for you. Beside having an incredibly attractive cast, a young Reese Witherspoon included, its plot twists the usual “mean clique” dynamics.

Set in a wealthy Manhattan, the film is about an oddly assorted couple: Sebastian Valmont and his step-sister Kathryn Merteuil. He’s well known for his countless sexual conquers and seductive manners, which perfectly match Kathryn’s inner wickedness and malice - but they always both manage to get away with it thanks to their fascinating looks and charming attitudes. 

The tight relationship between the two not only sees them accomplices in many misdeeds, but also gives rise to explicit sexual innuendos, as Sebastian’s not-so-secret fantasy is to sleep with Kathryn. Despite wishing the same, the girl likes to play it hard to get, so she decides to set up a bet: if Sebastian will be able to seduce Annette Hargrove, Kathryn will have sex with him - otherwise, she’ll get his vintage Jaguar. It’s not as easy as it seems: Annette is the daughter of their school’s headmaster and has recently written an article on saving her virginity for marriage.

As the time goes by and the relationship with Annette develops, Sebastian will find his controversial morals hardly tested. He’ll also have to manage the seduction of the young and naive Cecile, the new girlfriend of Kathryn’s ex, and he’ll be soon torn between his usual lifestyle and a wager maybe too hard to win, even for his unbeaten ego.

Cruel Intentions is weird, explicit, somehow shocking. It points out the differences between boys and girls as it comes to sex, providing a few interesting reflections under a chic, witty and dark atmosphere. Kathryn’s outfits are ICONIC and the movie will make you want more - and you’re lucky, because there are a prequel and a sequel.

Clueless (1995)

Dear diary, I’m more fabulous than five minutes ago.

I don’t even know how to start with this and if you’ve never seen Clueless before… oh my gosh, you can’t imagine what you’ve missed. This movie is p-e-r-f-e-c-t! 

Yes, we have a Queen Bee, Cher, with her sidekick Dionne. And yes, she’s vain and superficial. But she is funny, gorgeous, good natured, harmless and extremely relatable. You could easily make any quote from her character yours, really. She’s crazy wealthy and lives in a mansion in Beverly Hills, obviously being the most popular girl at school.

The movie explores Cher’s life and her attempts at making “good deeds”, showing how her attitude is more innocent than biased. She decides to give Tai Frasier, a “tragically unhip” girl, a makeover aimed at initiating her into the popular universe of their high school; she tries to act as cupid and match two professors (also to raise her grades); all of this, just for the sake of “giving back to the community”.

Cher’s hilarious adventures continue as she finds herself facing a new, attractive boy at school, her annoying stepbrother, the driving license exam and other teenage things we’ve all been through. I loved this movie because she’s fierce and self confident in a positive way, for once - and I won’t even mention the outfits of almost every character, which I’ve seen more than once reinterpreted in the latest collections of many fashion brands. And let me add that Alicia Silverstone’s facial expressions are the best thing in the world… In a few words: watch it. You won’t absolutely regret it.

The Craft (1996)

“You girls watch out for those weirdos” - “We are the weirdos, mister”

Everyone loves a bit of magic. Candles, chanting odd words, summoning the supernatural, meeting in the middle of the night - all things you probably don’t do but that still sound fascinating and attractive, especially if you are a young girl with a mysterious past in a new school where you know no one.

This is how it goes for Sarah Bailey once she arrives to the catholic academy of St. Benedict, Los Angeles. A group of outcasts, with difficult, gloomy lives and rumored to be practicing witchcraft, notices that Sarah is not as normal as she seems, thus luring her into joining their coven. The powers of the four girls reach a whole new level as they try to fix their messy lives and make up for any wrong that had been unfairly done to them.

However, nothing is easy when it comes to unearthly powers - the group will face difficult personal struggles and they will soon understand that everything comes with a price. 

This thriller will open your eyes on the hard life of social rejects in a surreal way, making you think twice before exposing someone not as lucky as you - you never know what may be their revenge. I loved The Craft because it explores a different side of the world depicted in the movies listed above - it gives voice to the unheard and shows things from a different point of view.

10 Things I Hate About You (1999)

But mostly, I hate the way I don’t hate you, not even close.

Sisters can be so different. Take Bianca and Kat Stratford, for example. One is popular, beautiful, admired and elegant, the other is a smart, casual, ironic bookworm. Cameron James (and adorable Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is head over heels for Bianca as soon as he sees her, but he’s warned by a friend that the girl’s father doesn’t allow her to date anyone. This doesn’t only upset Cameron, but Bianca as well - that’s why before the prom she quarrels with her dad until he agrees on letting her go at one condition: Kat has to find a boyfriend and go to the prom, too, causing Bianca to become furious since her sister will never want to be with someone.

Cameron finds out about the new rule and decides to find a boy who will date Kat, so then he’ll be able to go out with Bianca. The mission seems impossible, but of course we have Heath Ledger, in the role of Patrick Verona, who once again becomes the hero and (obviously with a heavy salary) agrees on trying.

Will the mission stay professional? Will Kat resist to Patrick’s charm or will she be trapped by the good-looking outcast as bitter as she is? Will Bianca go to prom with Cameron? You need to watch the movie to find out. This is one of my favourite ones, I’ve seen it at least three times and it’s just great - I always like watching the development of a romantic relationship, because each one is different from the other. And the singing scene on the bleachers? Iconic.

Romeo + Juliet (1996) - trailer

If love be rough with you, be rough with love.

Do I even have to say something?? I mean, Leo DiCaprio, Shakespeare’s most known masterpiece, love and death, Baz Luhrmann. This is enough, isn’t it?

Romeo + Juliet is the modernized and adapted version of the famous, tragic love story. It’s visionary, surreal, heartbreaking and it should be seen at least once a week because it’s just too much. It is set in a imaginary Verona Beach, where the adventures and deeds of two families in war intertwine with the forbidden love affair of a young boy and girl. The plot follows Shakespeare’s script, but you won’t find swords or horses. Guns and sportscars, gas stations and a swimming pool are just a few of the innovative twists Luhrmann has used in this dreamy and loud film.



What about you? What are your favourite 90ies/sleepover movies? Let us know by commenting this post, the Facebook page or sending an ask! x

ok we all know how íþróttaálfurinn is an elf, yes? well let me just tell you this, icelandic elves are not like what u see in movies. like no. 1 rule about icelandic elves is don’t fuck with them or they will either make u go insane or steal ur babies. they might do it anyway even if u do nothing. also don’t mess with the rocks or the hills where they live or ur cursed for life. if an elf tells u to do something u better do it bc u’ll get a reward and everything will be good but if u don’t…. hoo boy u gonna regret it

I think this might be an unpopular opinion based off some posts I’ve seen, but I don’t really think that the Liam romance is incomplete or needs fixing because there isn’t a big sex scene at the end of the romance. I think criticisms or desires for such are valid and wouldn’t want to diminish them. Granted, if Bioware threw more content at us, of any kind really, I’d happily take it. But I don’t think the merit of the romance is diminished because the arc does not culminate in sex.

Bioware said throughout development that not all romances would culminate in sex, and that there would be different romance arcs for different people. So for some Andromeda characters, yeah, the end of the romance comes together with sex. But not all, and I actually really like that. I think it can be a bit exclusionary of a narrative, and also unrealistic. I mean, think about it… in any relationship, are all ills past and future cured once the pair has sex? Not even close. It’s not always the hardest thing to work toward in a relationship.

For Liam, it doesn’t seem like sex is the hurdle. He gets a hookup early on and Ryder has the choice of whether to decide if they want to move forward with something more serious, or just leave it at a one night stand. If you choose to move forward with a relationship, you can definitely get the impression that this isn’t the most familiar thing to Liam. After you choose to lock in a relationship with him, he sends you an email where he talks about “no more games”. He hasn’t played with Ryder, hasn’t been dodgy or shady about a relationship. I think he mostly means himself by that. 

Then, he takes his sweet time putting together the jump jet date, as he says he will. He works on sweet things for the two of them, tries not to get ahead of himself, admits that he says things before thinking. It strikes me that taking relationships seriously with heavy commitment is something he wants, but knows he’s not great with. 

The romance doesn’t end with a titillating sex scene like some others do (and tbh on a personal level, I am very glad because the sex scenes have actually ruled out certain romances for me as an ace person). Liam doesn’t get a giant romantic “I love you” moment, but I think it’s hard to miss that all the scenes you get with him really do say I love you, just in his own way. He makes Ryder mix tapes of movies with themes, and sends them sweet messages just to let them know he’s thinking of them, talks about them growing old together. The love is clearly there, and I don’t think it means Liam loves Ryder any less if he doesn’t get a cut scene to show it.

I think that for a romance between two 20-somethings (because though we’re never given an age for Liam, I find it hard to believe he’s any older than 25/26), I think it’s highly realistic. I know plenty of people whose relationships begin with sex, and they fumble their way to something serious and committed. Sometimes people don’t know how to say “I love you” so easily, but they know how to show it in the best ways they can. So I really don’t believe that Liam didn’t get a good or complete romance because the arc is a bit reversed from Bioware’s usual formula. I think that the arc itself is just completely different, and to me, was incredibly refreshing.

tucker & dale and the instigation of internet mob culture

Re-watching Tucker and Dale vs. Evil (the parody movie where the rednecks in the woods are the hapless protagonists and its the bunch of paranoid college kids causing all the problems.)

Originally posted by maemaewolf

I’d forgotten how much the situation was escalated by the one teenager who was clearly looking for an excuse to hurt people.  The college kid that, at the beginning of the movie, explicitly declares himself a better person than those around him.

Chad.

He’s the one who tells his friends “what’s really going on here is worse than you think.” He’s the one who insists they handle it themselves and not through official channels. He’s the one who casts his opponents as “pure evil” and says “we finally have a chance to fight back without rules.” When some of the other teenagers express uncertainty he’s the one that says if they can’t handle what needs to be done, maybe they deserve to die, too.

“We have to burn this place to the ground.  Destroy it completely. You have no IDEA what this is all about, do you Allison? These freaks are evil. And they deserve everything that’s coming to them.”

I’d never realized before how closely every single plot point in the movie mirrors the way mob culture instigators will rile up the masses under the guise of “social justice”:

  1. You assume bad faith in your opponents.
  2. You declare your opponents subhuman and acceptable to hurt by any means.
  3. You discourage the use of peaceful or official methods to address the issue.
  4. You keep your followers in line through fear of the “other” and threats of ousting them into that group if they become “contaminated.”
  5. You revel in as much chaos and pain as you can inflict–

–after all, you’re the good guy.

kernelatorsblog  asked:

troll jake

Your name is JAYKKE NGLISH and you live alone on AN ISLAND OFF THE COAST OF THE MAINLAND that inhabits many LUSII. Your MOIRAIL is ROXXIE LALOND, who lives in the ocean frequently visits you on your island, your BEST BRO who you have a weird relationship with is DIRKKE STRIDR, who made you a ROBOT that BEATS THE SHIT OUT OF YOU and is the reason your HORN WAS BROKEN. Your other MUTUAL GOOD FRIEND is JAINNE CROKER, who you BELIEVE IN. You love to go out and do ADVENTURES AND WATCH COOL MOVIES. Which is to say, any movie. They’re all great. Your ancestor was a REBEL known to oppose the current rule of the EMPRESS, she was known as THE EXAMINER due to her apparent liking of the sciences. Your weapon of choice is a pair of TRUSTY PISTOLS, and you’re not afraid to pull them out. Oh, did you mention how much you just FUCKING LOVE MOVIES? Because you do. TROLL AVATAR is one of your favorites. It’s just AVATAR with the word “TROLL” in front of it, but you don’t know that, seeing as you ARE AND HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A TROLL.

anonymous asked:

Do you think the melodramatic space soap opera the Olkari king was watching is foreshadowing?

“ Betrayal! She loves you! “

Probably was just a typical drama scene, but who knows? future Keith and Allura? past Allura and Lotor?

I wonder though if this is like a classic drama? Or is it some modern series or movie? Is it like an Olkari movie? Galaxy famous movie? Like the girl is an Olkari.. the guy is some dino species… Is this like forbidden Olkari love? Do Olkari mate with these dino species? Are lizard like beings the beauty standard in Olkari society? In the Galaxy? Like I’m guessing this guy would be considered handsome if he’s staring in a romantic drama..

Does this show us a glimpse of a 10000 year old Olkari film industry? Zarkon rule film industry? (I dunno, like there are malls… and different species and not just Galra hang out in them.. seems like Zarkon is atleast somewhat investing in entertainment business for his conquered universe..)

I also like how Keith is always the only one who’s just completely unfazed by anything alien.

They all like “wtf” and Keith is there “Oh I’ve seen this one, good movie”