a low standard of living

BTS Explain Concepts Behind ‘Love Yourself: Her’ Album: 'This Is the Beginning of Our Chapter Two’

Mere hours before the release of BTS'Love Yourself: Her, the album’s significance wasn’t lost on the group’s leader, Rap Monster.

“It’s really a huge, big step for us,” the 23-year-old rapper/songwriter/producer told Billboard during a phone call from Seoul. “Of course, every member is so excited about the album. We’ve been just practicing until now, day and night, to show these new songs and perfected performances. I left a message on our fan cafe, the other day, after we finished that 'this EP will mark the turning point of BTS’ and even though the wait felt really long with this album – I think it was the huge event, the BBMAs, were in May – so much has happened.”

The wait has been particularly anticipated for for the band’s famously passionate fan base, known as Army, who have been waiting for new tracks from Rap Monster, Jimin, Suga, J-Hope, Jin, V and Jungkook band after voting them Top Social Artist at the 2017 Billboard Music Awards over fellow pop juggernauts Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande, Selena Gomez and Shawn Mendes.

Since then, the BTS guys have landed distribution deals with Amazon and U.S.-based The Orchard (“We believe the physical album, still, really counts and it’s really important to connect with our fans around the world,” Rap Monster said) and hung out with worldwide chart-toppers like Major Lazer, Halsey, Charli XCX(“Maybe it’s just my sixth sense, but I think maybe we will be collaborating with even more interesting artists,” he added); even snagging The Chainsmokers to produce a beat for Love Yourself: Her.

One listen to the tightly produced record – which looks likely to make a big splash on the Billboard 200 next week – and the passion is palpable from the intense lead single “DNA,” the societal commentary in “Go Go,” among multiple lyrics and moments that feel ripped from the members’ personal journals. There’s also loads of passion in Rap Monster’s voice talking about these new songs as he sees and envisions the larger picture and message for his band’s latest batch of forward-thinking EDM, hip-hop and pop tracks. Read on for Billboard’s deeper analysis of Love Yourself: Her with Rap Monster.

Let’s start right from the beginning with “Serendipity.” Why was this the right song to choose as the intro and kick off the era?

When I wrote the lyrics, melodies and the first themes of “Serendipity,” I tried to come up with some rare things you find in life, something very special, like the calico, three-striped cat; things that have extraordinary meanings in people’s lives. I wanted to share this moment.

I was reading the lyrics are gender neutral, which I think is really powerful. Was that a conscious decision?

The lyrics were based on rare and special things in life. So, I thought, those feelings transcend genders, cultures and barriers between people.

We always put out the “Intro” just before releasing our single, so the intro is taking the role of telling the concept of this album. But “Serendipity” was actually the right song to share the feelings of our single, “DNA.” The title is about how our DNA is connected in the universe, I think that was the right feel for this album.

Let’s talk about “DNA.” How does this single continue and progress the story of BTS?

When we’re talking about our title tracks, “DNA” is about the expression of a young, passionate love. The lyrics are like, “The two of us our connected fatefully from the start, our DNA was just the one thing.” At the same time, “DNA” is taking BTS to new ground. We tried to apply new grammar and perspectives – if you listen to the song, you’ll understand what I’m trying to say – it’s very different from our previous music, technically and musically. I believe it’s going to be the starting point of a second chapter of our career; the beginning of our Chapter Two.

“Best of Me” is really impressive. It sounds like The Chainsmokers, but it also sounds like BTS. You didn’t lose yourself which isn’t easy when collaborating with new artists. What was that process like?

I love that track! We met them at BBMAs, we were so lucky. Actually, they invited us to their concert just the other day – they had a huge concert in Korea and we sang “Closer” together. For “Best of Me,” they gave us several tracks and samples months ago, we and our producers picked one sample, like, “Okay, this is fit for our next album.” So we worked on it, we sent it to them, we asked them what they think of the track we developed and got their opinions. And we made it! I’m so excited for it. [Laughs]

Your albums always have deeper social and society commentaries. Let’s talk about some of the topics with this release. “Go Go” instantly comes to mind.

“Go Go” is a trendy song, but it’s about how our young generation are living their lives with low expectations and standards so people are upset with reality; they have little hope and there’s so much economic hardship. We wanted to say something about it and emphasize to the world that it’s not their choice, but brutal reality that forces people to live and spend as if there’s no future.

But in Korea, “YOLO” has become a big key word for young people because we don’t have money and it’s really hard to get a chance to earn a lot of money. I think society has a lot of problems for young people. Young people spend their money on claw crane machines at arcades and they spend like $30 on trying to win these dolls. And then it’s like, “Oh! I spent all my money…shit. But I don’t regret.” That’s the biggest luxury for Korea’s young people: collecting accessories, cosmetics, that’s what they think is a luxury. It’s “YOLO” because it’s like, “I’m gonna buy all this! I’m gonna buy all this food and I’m going to eat it! I’m going to do it!” I think it’s sad because it’s all we can. “Go Go” is just saying, “Okay, just do it, we won’t regret it. Just spend several bucks on the machine and eat the food!” But at the same time, the song is very easily to sing along to so I think many people will like that song, especially if they find the deeper meaning.

Of course, I have to ask about making a skit interlude out of your BBMAs acceptance speech.

You need to hear “Mic Drop” because the skit was my speech at BBMAs –  because that was a big moment for our history – and then we put “Mic Drop” next to that because it’s like a flex – like, “Okay, we’re done. We don’t need to give a shit about anything.” That was the right skit and follow-up song for this album.

The last song, “Outro: Her” really spoke to me. It almost reads like a diary.

Ha! [Laughs]

After talking with you, it feels like it recaps the whole album and is really introspective.

I think that was the fastest work I did for this album. I wrote the verse in 20 minutes; it just came, very truthfully, from the bottom of my heart. I thought it was the right outro for this album because it is really a range of emotions – I’m saying I met this person that I really love, this person is the love of my life right now, I’m saying that I was confused and I was looking for love and this world is complex. But I think it’s you so, “I call you 'her,’ 'cause you’re my tear.” “I think you’re the start and the end of me.” That’s what I’m saying: You’re my wonder, but you’re also my answers. You’re my “her,” but you’re still the “tear.”

The hook is saying that love is not all about the happiness, it’s just not just about the joy, it’s not just about delight. If you want to love a person, you should know that there are tears and there can even be hatred inside of it. I think a love really includes all of that. That’s what I was trying to say. It’s complex.

And if fans are so lucky to own the physical album, they’ll hear two hidden tracks at the very. Why keep them secretive?

I think they’re hidden because you have to be a real fan of BTS to understand them. Otherwise, you won’t. Otherwise, you’d like be, “Why are they feeling so confused about things? They’re good?!? They’re No. 1 somewhere, they have so much stuff, why are they worried?” People always talk about that. But if you are true fan of BTS and you buy the album and you listen to the hidden track – if you are an Army and we spent time together from 2013, 2014 – they could understand. It’s kind of more special, more closer, to our true hearts.

© Jeff Benjamin @ Billboard

BTS Explain Concepts Behind 'Love Yourself: Her' Album: 'This Is the Beginning of Our Chapter Two'

From the meaning of “Go Go” to why the band needed to flex their win at BBMAs, BTS’ Rap Monster explains it all.

Mere hours before the release of BTS’ Love Yourself: Her, the album’s significance wasn’t lost on the group’s leader, Rap Monster.“It’s really a huge, big step for us,” the 23-year-old rapper/songwriter/producer told Billboard during a phone call from Seoul. “Of course, every member is so excited about the album. We’ve been just practicing until now, day and night, to show these new songs and perfected performances. I left a message on our fan cafe, the other day, after we finished that ‘this EP will mark the turning point of BTS’ and even though the wait felt really long with this album – I think it was the huge event, the BBMAs, were in May – so much has happened."The wait has been particularly anticipated for for the band’s famously passionate fan base, known as Army, who have been waiting for new tracks from Rap Monster, Jimin, Suga, J-Hope, Jin, V and Jungkook band after voting them Top Social Artist at the 2017 Billboard Music Awards over fellow pop juggernauts Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande, Selena Gomez and Shawn Mendes.


How BTS’ BBMA Win Proves K-Pop Can Compete & Thrive on a Global Scale

Since then, the BTS guys have landed distribution deals with Amazon and U.S.-based The Orchard ("We believe the physical album, still, really counts and it’s really important to connect with our fans around the world,” Rap Monster said) and hung out with worldwide chart-toppers like Major Lazer, Halsey, Charli XCX(“Maybe it’s just my sixth sense, but I think maybe we will be collaborating with even more interesting artists,” he added); even snagging The Chainsmokers to produce a beat for Love Yourself: Her.One listen to the tightly produced record – which looks likely to make a big splash on the Billboard 200 next week – and the passion is palpable from the intense lead single “DNA,” the societal commentary in “Go Go,” among multiple lyrics and moments that feel ripped from the members’ personal journals. There’s also loads of passion in Rap Monster’s voice talking about these new songs as he sees and envisions the larger picture and message for his band’s latest batch of forward-thinking EDM, hip-hop and pop tracks. Read on for Billboard’s deeper analysis of Love Yourself: Her with Rap Monster.

Q: Let’s start right from the beginning with “Serendipity.” Why was this the right song to choose as the intro and kick off the era?

When I wrote the lyrics, melodies and the first themes of “Serendipity,” I tried to come up with some rare things you find in life, something very special, like the calico, three-striped cat; things that have extraordinary meanings in people’s lives. I wanted to share this moment.

Q: I was reading the lyrics are gender neutral, which I think is really powerful. Was that a conscious decision?

The lyrics were based on rare and special things in life. So, I thought, those feelings transcend genders, cultures and barriers between people.We always put out the “Intro” just before releasing our single, so the intro is taking the role of telling the concept of this album. But “Serendipity” was actually the right song to share the feelings of our single, “DNA.” The title is about how our DNA is connected in the universe, I think that was the right feel for this album.

Q: Let’s talk about “DNA.” How does this single continue and progress the story of BTS?

When we’re talking about our title tracks, “DNA” is about the expression of a young, passionate love. The lyrics are like, “The two of us our connected fatefully from the start, our DNA was just the one thing.” At the same time, “DNA” is taking BTS to new ground. We tried to apply new grammar and perspectives – if you listen to the song, you’ll understand what I’m trying to say – it’s very different from our previous music, technically and musically. I believe it’s going to be the starting point of a second chapter of our career; the beginning of our Chapter Two.

Q: “Best of Me” is really impressive. It sounds like The Chainsmokers, but it also sounds like BTS. You didn’t lose yourself which isn’t easy when collaborating with new artists. What was that process like?

I love that track! We met them at BBMAs, we were so lucky. Actually, they invited us to their concert just the other day – they had a huge concert in Korea and we sang “Closer” together. For “Best of Me,” they gave us several tracks and samples months ago, we and our producers picked one sample, like, “Okay, this is fit for our next album.” So we worked on it, we sent it to them, we asked them what they think of the track we developed and got their opinions. And we made it! I’m so excited for it. [Laughs]

Q: Your albums always have deeper social and society commentaries. Let’s talk about some of the topics with this release. “Go Go” instantly comes to mind.

“Go Go” is a trendy song, but it’s about how our young generation are living their lives with low expectations and standards so people are upset with reality; they have little hope and there’s so much economic hardship. We wanted to say something about it and emphasize to the world that it’s not their choice, but brutal reality that forces people to live and spend as if there’s no future. But in Korea, “YOLO” has become a big key word for young people because we don’t have money and it’s really hard to get a chance to earn a lot of money. I think society has a lot of problems for young people. Young people spend their money on claw crane machines at arcades and they spend like $30 on trying to win these dolls. And then it’s like, “Oh! I spent all my money…shit. But I don’t regret.” That’s the biggest luxury for Korea’s young people: collecting accessories, cosmetics, that’s what they think is a luxury. It’s “YOLO” because it’s like, “I’m gonna buy allthis! I’m gonna buy all this food and I’m going to eat it! I’m going to do it!” I think it’s sad because it’s all we can. “Go Go” is just saying, “Okay, just do it, we won’t regret it. Just spend several bucks on the machine and eat the food!” But at the same time, the song is very easily to sing along to so I think many people will like that song, especially if they find the deeper meaning.

Q: Of course, I have to ask about making a skit interlude out of your BBMAs acceptance speech.

You need to hear “Mic Drop” because the skit was my speech at BBMAs –  because that was a big moment for our history – and then we put “Mic Drop” next to that because it’s like a flex – like, “Okay, we’re done. We don’t need to give a shit about anything.” That was the right skit and follow-up song for this album.

The last song, “Outro: Her” really spoke to me. It almost reads like a diary.

Ha! [Laughs]

Q: After talking with you, it feels like it recaps the whole album and is really introspective.

I think that was the fastest work I did for this album. I wrote the verse in 20 minutes; it just came, very truthfully, from the bottom of my heart. I thought it was the right outro for this album because it is really a range of emotions – I’m saying I met this person that I really love, this person is the love of my life right now, I’m saying that I was confused and I was looking for love and this world is complex. But I think it’s you so, “I call you 'her,’ 'cause you’re my tear.” “I think you’re the start and the end of me.” That’s what I’m saying: You’re my wonder, but you’re also my answers. You’re my “her,” but you’re still the “tear.”

The hook is saying that love is not all about the happiness, it’s just not just about the joy, it’s not just about delight. If you want to love a person, you should know that there are tears and there can even be hatred inside of it. I think a love really includes all of that. That’s what I was trying to say. It’s complex.

Q: And if fans are so lucky to own the physical album, they’ll hear two hidden tracks at the very. Why keep them secretive?

I think they’re hidden because you have to be a real fan of BTS to understand them. Otherwise, you won’t. Otherwise, you’d like be, “Why are they feeling so confused about things? They’re good?!? They’re No. 1 somewhere, they have so much stuff, why are they worried?” People always talk about that. But if you are true fan of BTS and you buy the album and you listen to the hidden track – if you are an Army and we spent time together from 2013, 2014 – they could understand. It’s kind of more special, more closer, to our true hearts.

Source.

BTS Explain Concepts Behind 'Love Yourself: Her' Album: 'This Is the Beginning of Our Chapter Two'

From the meaning of “Go Go” to why the band needed to flex their win at BBMAs, BTS’ Rap Monster explains it all.

Mere hours before the release of BTS’ Love Yourself: Her, the album’s significance wasn’t lost on the group’s leader, Rap Monster.

“It’s really a huge, big step for us,” the 23-year-old rapper/songwriter/producer told Billboard during a phone call from Seoul. “Of course, every member is so excited about the album. We’ve been just practicing until now, day and night, to show these new songs and perfected performances. I left a message on our fan cafe, the other day, after we finished that ‘this EP will mark the turning point of BTS’ and even though the wait felt really long with this album – I think it was the huge event, the BBMAs, were in May – so much has happened.”

The wait has been particularly anticipated for the band’s famously passionate fan base, known as Army, who have been waiting for new tracks from Rap Monster, Jimin, Suga, J-Hope, Jin, V and Jungkook band after voting them Top Social Artist at the 2017 Billboard Music Awards over fellow pop juggernauts Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande, Selena Gomez and Shawn Mendes.

Since then, the BTS guys have landed distribution deals with Amazon and U.S.-based The Orchard (“We believe the physical album, still, really counts and it’s really important to connect with our fans around the world,” Rap Monster said) and hung out with worldwide chart-toppers like Major Lazer, Halsey, Charli XCX(“Maybe it’s just my sixth sense, but I think maybe we will be collaborating with even more interesting artists,” he added); even snagging The Chainsmokers to produce a beat for Love Yourself: Her.

One listen to the tightly produced record – which looks likely to make a big splash on the Billboard 200 next week – and the passion is palpable from the intense lead single “DNA,” the societal commentary in “Go Go,” among multiple lyrics and moments that feel ripped from the members’ personal journals. There’s also loads of passion in Rap Monster’s voice talking about these new songs as he sees and envisions the larger picture and message for his band’s latest batch of forward-thinking EDM, hip-hop and pop tracks. Read on for Billboard’s deeper analysis of Love Yourself: Her with Rap Monster.

Let’s start right from the beginning with “Serendipity.” Why was this the right song to choose as the intro and kick off the era?

When I wrote the lyrics, melodies and the first themes of “Serendipity,” I tried to come up with some rare things you find in life, something very special, like the calico, three-striped cat; things that have extraordinary meanings in people’s lives. I wanted to share this moment.

I was reading the lyrics are gender neutral, which I think is really powerful. Was that a conscious decision?

The lyrics were based on rare and special things in life. So, I thought, those feelings transcend genders, cultures, and barriers between people.

We always put out the “Intro” just before releasing our single, so the intro is taking the role of telling the concept of this album. But “Serendipity” was actually the right song to share the feelings of our single, “DNA.” The title is about how our DNA is connected in the universe, I think that was the right feel for this album.

Let’s talk about “DNA.” How does this single continue and progress the story of BTS?

When we’re talking about our title tracks, “DNA” is about the expression of a young, passionate love. The lyrics are like, “The two of us our connected fatefully from the start, our DNA was just the one thing.” At the same time, “DNA” is taking BTS to new ground. We tried to apply new grammar and perspectives – if you listen to the song, you’ll understand what I’m trying to say – it’s very different from our previous music, technically and musically. I believe it’s going to be the starting point of a second chapter of our career; the beginning of our Chapter Two.

“Best of Me” is really impressive. It sounds like The Chainsmokers, but it also sounds like BTS. You didn’t lose yourself which isn’t easy when collaborating with new artists. What was that process like?

I love that track! We met them at BBMAs, we were so lucky. Actually, they invited us to their concert just the other day – they had a huge concert in Korea and we sang “Closer” together. For “Best of Me,” they gave us several tracks and samples months ago, we and our producers picked one sample, like, “Okay, this is fit for our next album.” So we worked on it, we sent it to them, we asked them what they think of the track we developed and got their opinions. And we made it! I’m so excited for it. [Laughs]

Your albums always have deeper social and society commentaries. Let’s talk about some of the topics with this release. “Go Go” instantly comes to mind.

“Go Go” is a trendy song, but it’s about how our young generation are living their lives with low expectations and standards so people are upset with reality; they have little hope and there’s so much economic hardship. We wanted to say something about it and emphasize to the world that it’s not their choice, but brutal reality that forces people to live and spend as if there’s no future.

But in Korea, “YOLO” has become a big key word for young people because we don’t have money and it’s really hard to get a chance to earn a lot of money. I think society has a lot of problems for young people. Young people spend their money on claw crane machines at arcades and they spend like $30 on trying to win these dolls. And then it’s like, “Oh! I spent all my money…shit. But I don’t regret.” That’s the biggest luxury for Korea’s young people: collecting accessories, cosmetics, that’s what they think is a luxury. It’s “YOLO” because it’s like, “I’m gonna buy all this! I’m gonna buy all this food and I’m going to eat it! I’m going to do it!” I think it’s sad because it’s all we can. “Go Go” is just saying, “Okay, just do it, we won’t regret it. Just spend several bucks on the machine and eat the food!” But at the same time, the song is very easily to sing along to so I think many people will like that song, especially if they find the deeper meaning.

Of course, I have to ask about making a skit interlude out of your BBMAs acceptance speech.

You need to hear “Mic Drop” because the skit was my speech at BBMAs –  because that was a big moment for our history – and then we put “Mic Drop” next to that because it’s like a flex – like, “Okay, we’re done. We don’t need to give a shit about anything.” That was the right skit and follow-up song for this album.

The last song, “Outro: Her” really spoke to me. It almost reads like a diary.

Ha! [Laughs]

After talking with you, it feels like it recaps the whole album and is really introspective.

I think that was the fastest work I did for this album. I wrote the verse in 20 minutes; it just came, very truthfully, from the bottom of my heart. I thought it was the right outro for this album because it is really a range of emotions – I’m saying I met this person that I really love, this person is the love of my life right now, I’m saying that I was confused and I was looking for love and this world is complex. But I think it’s you so, “I call you 'her,’ 'cause you’re my tear.” “I think you’re the start and the end of me.” That’s what I’m saying: You’re my wonder, but you’re also my answers. You’re my “her,” but you’re still the “tear.”

The hook is saying that love is not all about the happiness, it’s just not just about the joy, it’s not just about delight. If you want to love a person, you should know that there are tears and there can even be hatred inside of it. I think a love really includes all of that. That’s what I was trying to say. It’s complex.

And if fans are so lucky to own the physical album, they’ll hear two hidden tracks at the very. Why keep them secretive?

I think they’re hidden because you have to be a real fan of BTS to understand them. Otherwise, you won’t. Otherwise, you’d like be, “Why are they feeling so confused about things? They’re good?!? They’re No. 1 somewhere, they have so much stuff, why are they worried?” People always talk about that. But if you are true fan of BTS and you buy the album and you listen to the hidden track – if you are an Army and we spent time together from 2013, 2014 – they could understand. It’s kind of more special, more closer, to our true hearts.

9/20/2017 by Jeff Benjamin - Billboard

someone calling mon-el the epitome of male perfection is so sad like damb im sorry a bland looking guy like that is perfection for u must be tough living w ya standards so low i would hate to live like that…

AUGUST J MOVIE [8/10/2017] - Making of the Movie: Fullmetal Alchemist (3 of 3) ~Special Interview #2~

Special Interview #2
Executive Producer Kazuya Hamana

Up until now, Producer Hamana has worked on many great works throughout his career. He tells us about this movie that was filmed abroad in Italy and how planning first began.

| Part 1 (On-set Report) & Part 2 (Yamada x Sori Interview) |


A Super Epic among Japanese Film that will surpass the rest

—Please give us the details on how this project came about.

H: I began working for Warner Brothers last year as a so-called ‘Old Rookie.’ (Note: Hamana began working for WB in February 2015.) Before that, I worked for Tokyo Broadcasting System (TBS) for over 20 years making films, but planning for a Fullmetal Alchemist live action adaptation by Director Fumihiko Sori had heated up while I was still working at TBS. However, I think a lot of people most likely wondered, “Can Japanese film really adapt this work into a live action?” Actually, there was a time when the FMA live action adaptation [project] wavered and the main Warner Bros. branch almost abandoned it so there were some very high hurdles [that we had to overcome]. After a great deal of persistence from us with the director at the head, the result of our creative presentation was receiving Arakawa-sensei’s approval around the time that I transferred to Warner. Since filming began in June in Italy and they’re currently shooting in a studio [in Tokyo], we’re looking at close to 3 months of shooting.

—When it comes to the script, did Arakawa-sensei also have a look at it?

H: Of course. If Arakawa-sensei had not approved the script, we wouldn’t be able to make a movie so even when dialogue needed to be changed based on the circumstances on-set, we confirmed the change after going over it in detail with Sensei.

—Please tell us the reason why Yamada-san was appointed the starring role of Ed?

H: When the director and I were deciding [who would play] the role of Ed—I think people who know the manga will understand—I kept thinking, ‘there really is nobody [that could play Ed].’ The result of our meeting was the director and Arakawa-sensei both believing, 'Yamada is the only one, isn’t he?’ Speaking of which, we offered Yamada-kun the role knowing full well that if he refused, then we would have no other choice than to abandon the entire project. It was our only chance and everything depended on [Yamada taking the role] so I am extremely happy that it all worked out.

—What was Yamada-san’s reaction?

H: I hear he was very surprised. I heard that he said he was very surprised about being picked to play the protagonist, but he definitely wanted to do it. After that, we met face to face where he told us how he couldn’t help but be excited. [Yamada] communicated with the director and started to look forward to preparing for the role with a positive attitude. During the first costume fitting it seemed like there was a part of him that was more confident so from then on I think the level of commitment increased. It’s also become clear that that’s the attitude he’s had towards his role since shooting began. I was talking with the director just a little while earlier and we think that as an actor, Yamada-kun possesses genius ability.

—Was there a moment during filming where you felt Yamada-san’s meticulousness?

H: Obviously, this movie comes with a lot of action so he’s very particular with quite a bit of it. In other words, he knows exactly how to put his Ed-like qualities into his performance. Because he gives off this perceptive and nimble attitude, in spite of wearing a heavy, hard-to-move-in costume, [Yamada] is meticulous about doing things the right way through to the end on-set while giving his own opinion.

—What about the fixation on the film location and the CG?

H: About drawing the backdrop of the manga, I thought that instead of having Japan as the scenery, I wanted to have a situation abroad. After all, the names of the characters that appear have Western spelling. Filming occurred in the rural town of Siena in Italy. Sadly I wasn’t able to go, but what I felt from the making [of the film] and the pictures taken was that the production staff was looking for the perfect location. [The search for] film locations in Japan also began last year in the middle of July. I feel as if the FMA world is consistently coming together.

Of course, the full picture also includes the CG in the total, but one can actually feel all of those pieces tightly coming together. Take Al for example, when I first saw him I was so surprised at his reproduction. After we made that CGI Al demo footage and showed it to Arakawa-sensei, she gave us her consent. From now on, I’m sure that there are many fans that are very worried, but I would like to appeal to those fans and ask them to look forward to the movie enthusiastically. The current standards for live action adaptations may be low, but I support changing those standards into something higher, and I believe this film can.

—The manga is quite long, so what kind of story is planned for this movie version?

H: It’s a manga that is much, much longer therefore we can’t fit it all into a single movie, nor is this a movie that is slated to open in two parts, so once this movie is completed, we’re thinking that we would like to connect it to the next movie while staying faithful to the manga. To be honest, [this movie] will become an epic [work] with an all-star cast that will surpass recent Japanese film and shatter the budget so I would be happy if everyone could look forward to its opening.

anonymous asked:

honestly how is anyone having babies in the wasteland with all the radiation? it's in the food/water/environment/etc. wouldn't that affect fertility at all?

Actually, this is how I explain the lack of children in Fallout’s world!

This is a piece on

Birth control/sterility + some speculation on Duncan’s illness and the New Plague

Societies with living standards as low as the ones in the wasteland typically have lots of children - as a way to ensure that at least some of them survive and get to experience adulthood. It’s not just the raiders and simple bandits that should be taken into account - there are also the matters of malnutrition, starvation and, most importantly, diseases, which are far worse enemies than anything else, especially with the admittedly low level of medical care in the wasteland. Yes, there are doctors, and they can help you get better, but all of them seem to specialize on combat medicine, meaning that they heal wounds, not maladies. They know what to do if you break a leg or get shot, in short - they know how to stitch you up. It’s easier and simpler than having to deal with mysterious symptoms when a person is coughing their lungs out or develops an unexplainable rash. You can’t treat that with Med-X and RadAway. You have to know what tuberculosis and dermatitis are, how they are treated and how you can help a person when there is no medicine left from the Old World that might help you.

And despite all of this, children are a rarity in the wasteland. Having more than one child borders on impossible, it seems. So my explanation is exactly that: that the high radiation level is what keeps people from getting pregnant.

That also explains how wasteland people deal with birth control. They don’t. Simple as that. I’m certain there are no pills left, and condoms probably aren’t easy to come by anymore either - if they’d be of any use any longer anyways, after 200 years. So yeah, even though all these methods are no longer available, people still don’t get pregnant as often as they should - which means that they just aren’t able to.

And since I’ve already mentioned diseases, I’ll take this chance to talk a little bit about them, if you allow me…

Not much has been said about diseases in Fallout’s lore, but unless the wastelanders magically mutated and developed resistance against most forms of illnesses (given everything, it might be something to consider…), diseases should be celebrating a grand, grand comeback. Vaccines are gone. Medicine is gone. Knowledgeable doctors are gone. All of this, and especially the first factor, mean that it was really easy for the bacteria to start threatening human lives again, as they did in the Middle Ages.

Honestly, with a setting like that, I am surprised that the wasteland hasn’t experienced a few pandemics yet. But we don’t have many characters talking about diseases at all, as far as I can remember - unless the illness is a consequence of high radiation, like in the Pitt. Except there is one: MacCready.

It hasn’t been made clear what it was that happened to Duncan but the description MacCready gives us is this:

”One day he’s playing out in the fields behind our farms, the next he took a fever and these blue boils popped up all over his body. Last time I saw him he was almost to weak to walk”

The first thing that came to my mind was the bubonic plague. I am even sure that I wasn’t the only one who made that connection, yet I wasn’t actually satisfied with it. Because the bubonic plague? Really? How high are the chances for that to happen? But I honesty wasn’t able to find any other disease with similar symptoms. The only other alternative I stumbled upon were staphylococcal infections where boils happen to be a common symptom. But it’s different and it doesn’t match the picture. Not exactly. The boils aren’t blue, and sometimes it looks more like the first stages of ghoulification. Not to mention other symptoms like cellulitis, contagious rash MacCready doesn’t seem to have, and other things that aren’t mentioned in the description of Duncan’s condition.

Of all the actually existing diseases, the bubonic plague resembles Duncan’s condition the most.

I wrote about it (link) a while ago, and some sentences from the last paragraph are copypasted from there. The big question, of course, is why the whole wasteland isn’t infected yet. Several things to consider:

  1. The people of the Capital Wasteland live isolated from one another. That way, any kind of disease has troubles spreading and infecting a lot of people.
  2. Even though it seems that way, people don’t always get sick if they have a relative who is infected with the bubonic plague. Which makes sense because otherwise most of us wouldn’t be alive - none of our ancestors would have survived the Black Death of the 14th century. That’s why MacCready isn’t ill.
  3. Duncan isn’t the only case. MacCready wants to go to Med-Tek and search for the cure in this place because he met a person whose buddy got sick with the same disease. So it seems like it does spread, to some extent at least.
  4. Perhaps, the most interesting point. As it turns out, there is such a thing as immunity against the bubonic plague. According to genetic studies, during the Black Death only 0,2% of Europe’s population had such an immunity. Naturally, every person that fit into this small category survived - and passed their genes on to the next generation. So now, as an American citizen, you have a 15% chance of carrying that gene. It is possible that the number of such people grew over the centuries.
  5. But this is the theory I support more than any other, even though I originally dismissed it:

It’s the New Plague

Remember this?

For those who don’t know or forgot: the New Plague is a virus that has been engineered by the U.S. government - it was a weapon created with the intent of sterilizing the infected people, meaning, of course, the Chinese. Naturally, the Chinese got hold of the virus and released it on American ground, which led to 200 000 dead, a nation-wide quarantine, and later - to the creation of the Forced Evolutionary Virus, that was originally designed as a Pan-Immunity Virion Project to make every American citizen immune against every disease.

The symptoms of the New Plagues are these:

The time from onset of early, flu-like symptoms to death was three to five days. Later, infected subjects suffered from profuse sweating, unexplained contusions/swelling, and massive external hemorrhaging. Eventually, the New Plague resulted in clogged respiration, usually killing the infected subject. Survivors of the New Plague usually ended up sterile.

It was also called the Blue Flu. 

[…] the next he took a fever and these blue boils popped up all over his body….

It is important to note here that most of the information we have on the New Plague, comes from Bethesda, more specifically, from the DLC “Point Lookout”. It seems, Black Isle was more interested in FEV and what little they said about the disease, was included into the Fallout Bible. The symptoms though? That’s Bethesda. They’re the ones who described the illness and put the Disaster Relief Outpost in Point Lookout. They seem to be at least somewhat interested in the topic, and maybe more than that - it is even hypothesized that the swampfolk they created is the result of incest, radiation and a mutated strain of the New Plague. The disease might even still be there, in Point Lookout. And that’s not very far away from the Capital Wasteland.

Point is: Bethesda fleshed out the New Plague in Fallout 3. Described its symptoms for the first time. And then gave very similar symptoms to a boy who happens to be the son of their own character from the previous game. That looks incredibly suspicious to me. It still does, even if we don’t take Bethesda into account.

So. As a conclusion, we have: an area full of people that might have been affected by the New Plague, a case that looks like the New Plague in the Capital Wasteland and one in the Commonwealth (which means that the virus is spreading), and no medical care.

Words cannot describe how much I hope that Bethesda is going to do something with that.

Family Matters

Summary: Even someone as solitary as Mukuro has a family and she’s still learning how it works.

AKA the happiest fic you’ll ever read of Muku because she deserves this

Pairing: Mukuro Ikusaba x Makoto Naegi (naekusaba)

Cameo: Junko Enoshima, Komaru Naegi, the rest of the class

Keep reading

K-POP MV MEANINGS - 2NE1 COME BACK HOME [UPDATED]

We understand many of you are confused by the new 2NE1 “COME BACK HOME”MV and here at K-POP TIMEOUT we have an explanation for you!

First, here are the English Lyrics to help put things into perspective.

So the MV begins in a futuristic worldwith cyberpunk influences (cyberpunk focuses on high tech but low living standards). There is a billboard that reads “VIRTUAL PARADISE”. This is an important metaphor throughout the whole MV which we will get back to later,

We are then given a stark contrast to the promises of the billboard with the interior of the city, all falling apart (although beautifully HD on our computer screens).

The song begins with us jumping back into the “Virtual Paradise” in the billboard.

So the MV has 3 story lines - CL, Dara and Minzy&Bom.Their stories all become intertwined later on. We begin with CL, a resistance leader against the cyberpunk government, spray painting the derelict streets of white boring-ness (white is used in the MV pretty much with regards to anything simple and uninteresting). Her spraying paint pretty much means she wants to bring back color to the world. 

The lyrics seem to be about a boy who left her but in terms of CL’s story line metaphor, she is asking for the old world to come back as she looks upon what it has become.

We then see Minzy’s (&Bom’s) storyline, of her driving to work and appear more well off than the others with a nice automobile but she looks bored of the mundane everyday routine. For her the boy who left her was the exciting parts of life that she so misses.

male hand is shown moving barely and wearing sci-fi glasses.

This is all connected to something similar to an intravenous injection drip,which is used as foodfor patients in a coma. A motherboard (the “brain” of a computer) is found inside the drip, suggesting that this is brain food, which we will get back to later (there is even a computer fan to prevent it from overheating).

We are finally shown Dara’s story line, the most complex of them all and the only one involving a real boy(the same as the one lying in bed with sci-fi glass). She is seen to have a sweet life with her lover, except they live in a rather simple home of little glamor (and it’s white). While Dara seems to enjoy life as it is, we see Mr Lover looking longingly at the promised utopia in the “VIRTUAL PARADISE” Ad.

Other than a beautiful world, “VIRTUAL PARADISE” even seems to promise better bodily abilities.

Dara is then seen in the dining room with her lover, the whole place being whitewith little to no utensils and having no real food. Instead, they are seen to be eating pills, once again, highlighting the shitty standard of living in their world.

The eating of pills also suggest they live in a sick worldwhich may also make the fact Dara’s boy wants a stronger body as advertised may be another metaphor for wanting to leave the current world.

Time to go back to Minzy story line where she is now joined by Bom. The two are seen to be working in a factory line(no wonder Minzy’s bored with her life), producing the pills that people seem to eat as food along with other interesting chemicalssimilar to the color of the brain food. It can be seen that they are part of the system in this sad cyberpunk universe.

We are brought back to CL’s story, with her walking down the abandoned streets of what may have once been a booming city, her face with of despair for all that has gone away.

Meanwhile, Dara’s boy shaves his head and since we see him in sci-fi glasses state bald, we can assume that is his move towards joining “VIRTUAL PARADISE”, which Dara of course is not happy about.

CL the resistance leader shows her anger to the state as she breaks a power supply(obviously a symbol for power and control), gazing menacingly at the “VIRTUAL PARADISE”.

CL is then shown wearing the same sci-fi glasses as Dara’s boy earlier on and we finally get a glimpse of what they really do.

The brain foodwith the glasses together feed our minds with images of a beautiful colorful world, almost like stuff you expect to see when you are high on drugs.

And as the ad promised, this “VIRTUAL PARADISE” also comes with a stronger, better version of yourself as CL witnesses even badass-er(or in CL terms, badder?) than sci-fi glasses CL with even crazier glasses and all, once again similar to how people see themselves when on drugs.

And just to highlight these hallucinations/virtual images/virtual reality we see multiple CLs.

After a journey down druggie sci-fi glasses lane, we see CL walking into a factory, the one where Minzy and Bom works in. CL raps her way to get these girls to join her gang and suddenly we see Dara working there too.

This shows another level to Dara and her boy’s relationship. Not only did he jump ship to “VIRTUAL PARADISE”, she feels guilty as she is part of the system that pushed him to join a fake reality instead treasuring the less perfect but sweet one with her. This is almost like a metaphor of your boyfriend dumping you for a pretty but fake girl while you are sort of to blame for pushing him away too.

At this point we also see CL walking into a part of the factory full of plants similar to marihuana plants (or an attempt to look like them). This further suggests the idea of drugs used in the brain food and the idea of imaginations and hallucinations.

Minzy is seen driving home deep in thought, considering CL’s proposition to join her resistance movement.

In her car we see a time bomb which can symbolise 2 things - time is ticking and shit is about to go down or/and she has made up her mind to start living it up a bit and join CL on her adventure.

We are shown Dara’s boy lying still inside the world of “VIRTUAL PARADISE” (why don’t we just call this state VIRTUAL PARALYSED), with Dara also considering whether to join CL or not.

Minzy lays with the sci-fi glasses on.

Actually all of them, confirming that they have all joined CL.

What is different is they they are all connected to one brain food, suggesting that they are in a process of sharing the same thoughts and ideas (metaphor for cooperation but also something else..)

We are then shown CL, who we assume is the one sharing this brain foodas well as ideas and cunning plans for her resistance movement.

Then a flashback is shown to how Dara came to her decision, showing her watching the same ad on the tv (or maybe it’s the only ad since they live in some totalitarian cyberpunk wasteland?!).

We also see flashbacks of the good old days of love

..contrasting heavily with him lying still in a virtual world now.

Contrary to popular belief, Dara did not kill her old lover, she unplugs the sci-fi glasses. It is like a symbol of her snapping him out of the virtual world, telling him to wake up (like slapping your ex literally or just by telling him his girl now is actually a fake slut or something along those lines..) 

Bom is then suddenly singing in a high class party where everyone is dressed as angels, perhaps a metaphor that these people are all seen as saints or simply rich people living like gods. Or they may even of cupidswho messed up love lives but anyways…

We are then shown Bom in glasses, suggesting that this was part of the CL’s plan.

We get a glimpse of beautifully executed yet bizaare food like enormous fish heads and octopuses on who knows what, hinting at the connection of these rich ass saints/cupids/what not-s being tied to the “VIRTUAL PARADISE” program (because it’s fake beautiful food in a fake beautiful world..). Aside, from this comparison tying them to the virtual world druggie program, is it not fishy that these people are actually eating some form of food while Dara and her boo had to eat pills?? They are definitely in some sort of powerful elite position.

CL then enters with her almighty spray can and starts spraying these “saints”, bringing color to their boring white clothes, their boring white world full of sad lives.

Minzy also enters with molotov cocktails ready for action.

Minzy glances at Dara for the cue and Dara readies herself for this. Compared to the others she seemed more conflicted and confused, as she was doing this to avenge the world for messing up her boy then again she feels like she was part of this world.

Then shit goes down and we see flying grapes, with grapes being a symbol of wealth andpower (like Roman emperors :P) The resistance has begun and things are going to be overthrown.

Fire, the symbol of passion and revenge, is also seen after some lovely aiming from CL’s molotov cocktails.

After trashing the party and basically the elite society (and if those peeps were cupids, the horrible love they brought about), the girls exit, heading onto their next mission.

A red paint bomb is shown blowing up backwards, signifying a flashback.

We see their brain food sharing session, with explosion and destruction of the virtual world (The thing which CL loathed).

The breaking down of a monotone boring world. (The world which Minzy & Bom despised)

And finally a skull on the face of Dara’s lover, representing the lifeless state he became, breaking away from him finally. (The part that Dara wants gone from him forever)

Their individual faces also exploded into vibrant colors, suggesting that they have changed and evolved for the better (like girls changing after a breakup into new stronger women).

The girls then march along, leading a resistance movement behind them.

And the “VIRTUAL PARADISE” then breaks away.

In the MV, all the girls had to deal with different types of love of the past that left them - love of the environment, love of adventure and love of a significant other. They all wanted these loves of the past to “Come Back Home” and fought for it, becoming stronger and better in the process. 

Most important of all, they could not have done any of their things alone and while they had different aims, they were all united for their search for love. And they finished it all off with a movement of people, us Blackjacks, united as one with our Hot Pink fan color mist, marching for a better love together. In a sense, 2NE1 and the fandom are always here to support each other through rain and storm :3 

Last but not least, we jump out from the screen in the end of the MV, showing that the uprising/revolution took place in the virtual world, just like how Blackjacks and 2NE1 are united in the internet, where we will do great things together.

Was this helpful in understanding the MV?

If you notice anything else do not hesitate to comment as I may have missed something :P

Requested by anonymous

Pairing: Izaya/Namie
Theme: thunderstorms

Namie’s pen clattered to the desk at the first clap of lightning.

Izaya was on the couch but he didn’t turn to look at the noise. He laid on his back with a blanket draped over him, one arm over his eyes and the other folded over his stomach. Work had been busy and he finally found a night off, because even Orihara Izaya needed sleep.

Picking up the pen again, Namie kept working until she heard another crack, this time electricity cutting out, her lamp dimming. She stared at it and tapped it a few times, but to no avail; she stared at it until there was another flash and hands were over her ears, just barely dulling the following sound.

Pushing her chair back and standing, she made her way to Izaya, understanding she only had a few seconds before it would happen again. Izaya heard the footsteps and raised his arm, turned to look at her. And she prepared herself for the sneer, the taunt, the smirk, but he just pulled away the blanket and waited until she curled up gingerly next to him to replace it.

“You’ll fall off like that.”

Namie blinked when she felt herself pulled close, her head resting on top of his chest, his arm holding her. From the way he’d handled the situation, she decided it wouldn’t be too outrageous to guess he’d done this before, probably with his sisters. She frowned at the idea and hit him lightly.

He laughed.

“Aah, should I make you go home?”

“…You can try but I won’t leave. I live here.”

“Oh? Did you sign the contract too?”

“I have a toothbrush and a change of clothes.”

“What low standards of living…”

Namie stiffened when she felt his grip on her tighten, realizing it was only because he was shifting to get more comfortable. Afterwards he relaxed again and she melted into him, focusing more on the warmth and weight of the blanket, listening to Izaya’s heartbeat.

…Thank you.

Izaya smirked and Namie clicked her tongue at the idea of him being a mind reader.

Employee benefits.

pomelinefrich  asked:

Hi! I'm trying to write a story in which people from the middle ages/medieval era somehow end up timetravelling to now, the 21st century. What are some things I should keep in mind? Like, how would they react/adjust and stuff?

  • Secularism. Religion was a big part of the Middle Ages and an era where a minority regularly attend church (and not even the Catholic Church) would shock most medieval people.
  • Science. Science used to be a branch of theology. Now science and religion stand on opposite ends of the spectrum. It will be strange to see everything that used to be “divine” explained in mathematical ways.
  • Technology. Probably the most obvious one here. There weren’t any smartphones back then and the reliance on horseless carriages now will be shocking.
  • Modern Economy. The absence of the manor system would be shocking enough, although your medieval people might find small comfort in the large disparity between the working poor and rich. Few people work on farms and no one is tied to the land. Wealth depends on money, not (always) on land. Women are in the workforce and children aren’t expected to work. 
  • Things. Salt was pretty expensive. So was pepper, purple cloth, sugar, clothes, soap, silverware, paintings, and many other things we take for granted today. The middle class today has x200 more things than the middle class of the Middle Ages did. The material wealth would be staggering, and it wouldn’t be hard to convince a peasant that a lower-middle class family was somehow royalty.
  • Standard of Living. Infant mortality is low. Many awful diseases (including the Black Death, cholera, and leprosy) are now curable. The average lifespan is about eighty in first world countries. People bathe regularly (with soap, which is now really cheap!!) and change clothes every day. 
  • Language. Depending on where they’re from, your characters will speak Middle English, Old English, Old French, Middle Danish, Vulgar Latin, or some other archaic form of a modern European language. Said languages don’t translate readily to their modern equivalent. For example, you can understand the gist of what a Middle English speaker is saying, but in some places they mind as well be speaking Urdu for all you understand.
  • Education. Most people have had at least eight years of ¾ year schooling. The schooling took place at a secular institution and everyone received the same opportunity, regardless of social status, religion, race, or gender. Most people know how to read and write, basic mathematics, and are versed in history, science, philosophy, athletics, art, music, and whatever other electives they took up in high school. 
  • Food. Medieval diets were high in vegetables if you were poor and meat if you were rich. Modern diets are a little more balanced. Modern foods are also laden with sugar and fat (delicacies in the Middle Ages), has tenderer meat, and often comes in a container if it’s not fresh produce. Drinking tap water (with a lemon?!?!?) will be hard to get used to for people who grew up on ale, mead, wine, and beer, and were told that drinking water was dangerous.
  • Information. Letting a medieval person read the morning paper would amaze them. Taking a medieval person to the local library would blow them away. The amount of information we have at our fingertips even without the internet and television is staggering. Internet, radio, and television would be astounding and, since few know how the internet etc. work, perhaps magical. 
  • Government. Rights guaranteed for all? No monarchy? Democracy? They will be relatively new concepts for your characters, assuming they aren’t versed in Greek democratic literature. 
  • Interdependence. Manors sought to be self-sufficient. They were, for the most part, so anyone in a medieval village could usually find what they needed - clothes, tools, seed, food - from the people in the village or the materials in it. The modern era sees clothes from 100000 different brands, tools from China, seeds from Monsanto, and food from basically everywhere. Modern people don’t need to know how to grow their own food because they can just go to the supermarket to buy it.
  • Morals. Women walking around with their hair unbound and displaying skin. Masturbation is the butt of jokes, not a moral sin. There is no such thing as a solemn promise. The death penalty is a last resort and not imposed in many places. Corporeal punishment is opposed. The whole concept of a life period between childhood and adulthood. The fact that people don’t know the intimate particulars of all their neighbors’ lives.
  • He’s Dead, Jim. And, of course, your medieval people will need to deal with the fact that everyone they’ve ever known is dead. Their time period is hundreds if not a thousand years behind them. They will probably try to find out what happened to their families, towns, country, etc. 
Malcolm X on Zionism

Taken from The Egyptian Gazette – Sept. 17, 1964

The Zionist armies that now occupy Palestine claim their ancient Jewish prophets predicted that in the “last days of this world” their own God would raise them up a “messiah” who would lead them to their promised land, and they would set up their own “divine” government in this newly-gained land, this “divine” government would enable them to “rule all other nations with a rod of iron.”

If the Israeli Zionists believe their present occupation of Arab Palestine is the fulfillment of predictions made by their Jewish prophets, then they also religiously believe that Israel must fulfill its “divine” mission to rule all other nations with a rod of irons, which only means a different form of iron-like rule, more firmly entrenched even, than that of the former European Colonial Powers.

These Israeli Zionists religiously believe their Jewish God has chosen them to replace the outdated European colonialism with a new form of colonialism, so well disguised that it will enable them to deceive the African masses into submitting willingly to their “divine” authority and guidance, without the African masses being aware that they are still colonized.

CAMOUFLAGE

The Israeli Zionists are convinced they have successfully camouflaged their new kind of colonialism. Their colonialism appears to be more “benevolent,” more “philanthropic,” a system with which they rule simply by getting their potential victims to accept their friendly offers of economic “aid,” and other tempting gifts, that they dangle in front of the newly-independent African nations, whose economies are experiencing great difficulties. During the 19th century, when the masses here in Africa were largely illiterate it was easy for European imperialists to rule them with “force and fear,” but in this present era of enlightenment the African masses are awakening, and it is impossible to hold them in check now with the antiquated methods of the 19th century.

The imperialists, therefore, have been compelled to devise new methods. Since they can no longer force or frighten the masses into submission, they must devise modern methods that will enable them to manouevre the African masses into willing submission.

The modern 20th century weapon of neo-imperialism is “dollarism.” The Zionists have mastered the science of dollarism: the ability to come posing as a friend and benefactor, bearing gifts and all other forms of economic aid and offers of technical assistance. Thus, the power and influence of Zionist Israel in many of the newly “independent” African nations has fast-become even more unshakeable than that of the 18th century European colonialists… and this new kind of Zionist colonialism differs only in form and method, but never in motive or objective.

At the close of the 19th century when European imperialists wisely foresaw that the awakening masses of Africa would not submit to their old method of ruling through force and fears, these ever-scheming imperialists had to create a “new weapon,” and to find a “new base” for that weapon.

DOLLARISM

The number one weapon of 20th century imperialism is zionist dollarism, and one of the main bases for this weapon is Zionist Israel. The ever-scheming European imperialists wisely placed Israel where she could geographically divide the Arab world, infiltrate and sow the seed of dissension among African leaders and also divide the Africans against the Asians.

Zionist Israel’s occupation of Arab Palestine has forced the Arab world to waste billions of precious dollars on armaments, making it impossible for these newly independent Arab nations to concentrate on strengthening the economies of their countries and elevate the living standard of their people.

And the continued low standard of living in the Arab world has been skillfully used by the Zionist propagandists to make it appear to the Africans that the Arab leaders are not intellectually or technically qualified to lift the living standard of their people … thus, indirectly “enducing” Africans to turn away from the Arabs and towards the Israelis for teachers and technical assistance.

“They cripple the bird’s wing, and then condemn it for not flying as fast as they.”

The imperialists always make themselves look good, but it is only because they are competing against economically crippled newly independent countries whose economies are actually crippled by the Zionist-capitalist conspiracy. They can’t stand against fair competition, thus they dread Gamal Abdul Nasser’s call for African-Arab Unity under Socialism.

MESSIAH?

If the “religious” claim of the Zionists is true that they were to be led to the promised land by their messiah, and Israel’s present occupation of Arab Palestine is the fulfillment of that prophesy: where is their messiah whom their prophets said would get the credit for leading them there? It was Ralph Bunche who “negotiated” the Zionists into possession of Occupied Palestine! Is Ralph Bunche the messiah of Zionism? If Ralph Bunche is not their messiah, and their messsiah has not yet come, then what are they doing in Palestine ahead of their messiah?

Did the Zionists have the legal or moral right to invade Arab Palestine, uproot its Arab citizens from their homes and seize all Arab property for themselves just based on the “religious” claim that their forefathers lived there thousands of years ago? Only a thousand years ago the Moors lived in Spain. Would this give the Moors of today the legal and moral right to invade the Iberian Peninsula, drive out its Spanish citizens, and then set up a new Moroccan nation … where Spain used to be, as the European zionists have done to our Arab brothers and sisters in Palestine?…

In short the Zionist argument to justify Israel’s present occupation of Arab Palestine has no intelligent or legal basis in history … not even in their own religion. Where is their Messiah?

bettysnooze  asked:

CAH ( hershey )

( @hvschweetz )

Black card: In M. Night Shyamalan’s new movie, Bruce Willis discovers that __________ had really been __________ all along.
White card: A low standard of living. // Eugenics.

Alissa glared at the flyer on the notice board, trying to make sense of it. “…But who would ever want to be in another M. Night Shyamalan movie after the monstrosity of the Last Airbender?”

9

Navyy is working this evening so her grandmother came over to watch Minky in the afternoon and then I took over when I came home from work.  Oma (the German name for grandmother, which is what we call her), brought over a couple toys that she picked up at the local thrift store - one of those jangly push toys, and the classic Fisher Price red coupe.  Minky still has not quite figured out the logistics of walking it around himself, but he had fun getting in and out and playing with the gas cap.  It is missing its (non-functional) steering wheel, which I am sure he would have enjoyed, but free toys are always a plus!

Afterwards I made up some fish tacos using a number of random things we had sitting around.  As far as I am concerned the key ingredients to great tacos are some kind of awesomely seasoned protein, corn tortillas, cilantro, lime, and a little onion - anything else is extra.  These were pretty heavy on the “extra” with some black beans, leftover quinoa, fresh yellow pear tomatoes from the garden, and some salsa.  Normally I tend to be pretty minimalist, but these were pretty good and an easy way to use up some things that otherwise probably would have languished in the refrigerator.  Minky is a pretty solid eater these days, and loves tortillas and black beans.  I was surprised that he did not finish off the peaches, but hey, no real complaints here.  And check out that “big kid” glass - he has been really into drinking water in cups without lids/straws.  We had a bit of a spill tonight, but all-in-all he has done really well with them.

After dinner we played with some cars in the living room, and then he brought me a bottle of nail polish.  Up to now we have not painted his toes, but I figured I would give it a try.  The results were giggling and an emphatic “more” from him when I asked if he wanted me to continue.  So he ended up with one set of blue toes and one set of red toes and then we watched part of a King Arthur and the Knights of Justice episode on Youtube while they dried a bit (he rarely gets screentime, but I figured it would help prevent lots of errant nail polish smearing all over our carpet, etc.).

Bedtime went smoothly, and now I have the house to myself until 9:30 when Navyy gets home.  Woooo!  I thought about trying to accomplish something, but I will probably save that for tomorrow night (since she is working the same shift again), and instead just relax, have a beer, and maybe play some video games.

Also I heard rumor that Sharknado 2 is premiering tonight.  Those of you who watch it, enjoy, the first one was hilariously awful/funny.  Hope it lives up to those high (low?) standards.

When he questions whether we’re getting value for our money by compensating victims of a literal and cultural genocide how is that not racist? This compensation is the minimum that any government that does this to its citizens is required.

Poilevre is speaking like its so inconvenient to compensate those who had their lives ruined by the Canadian government.

I think First Nations independence and accountability is important but you first have to give people back control over their lives. If you put any other group through a residential school system no one would dare use that kind of language towards the victims.

Speaking of which First Nations communities are hugely underfunded compared to the rest of Canada. This is why their standard of living is so low when compared to the rest of the country.