a life full of holes

ok but honestly what would i be without bangtan

anonymous asked:

Here's a headcanon question for you. How did Phoenix pay for law school? Did he work a side job? Did his family help pay for it?

//The AA universe is so damn confusing that it does make me wonder. Like, if we’re talking realistically, none of the lawyers in the series (at least the main/young ones) would be lawyers at the ages they are.You can’t be a full lawyer at the ages they’re at, but we just have to pretend that the messed up legal system allows teenagers to be lawyers, you know?

//Anyway, I imagine his process could have been sped up because he was working under Mia while going through law school. She would have helped him figure out how to go about it and it seems like he worked as her secretary before he became a lawyer (like you examine the desk out front in the second case and he talks about how it had been his desk).

//His parents probably did help him out as well and that money along with what else he was earning (and maybe whatever else had been put aside) might have been just enough for him to get through law school. And might also be the reason he’s so broke to begin with - he put any money he had saved up and what his parents had saved up so that he could become a lawyer. 

Is Quigley Quagmire a liar?

Every self-respecting Snicket fan has entertained the theory of a deceiving, villainous Quigley Quagmire at least once. In honor of this cherished tradition, the Snicket Sleuth is now proud to present a variation on this idea.

The character is suspicious and mysterious; however, it’s not that easy an accusation to prove. Quigley has numerous occasions to betray the Baudelaire orphans throughout the story and doesn’t seize them. And, although the stories he tells them about his life after the Quagmire fire are full of holes, his allegations are largely confirmed by other characters (Kit Snicket, Captain Widdershins, etc).

More reasonably, we can therefore assume that Quigley is not a liar per se. He could, however, be guilty of retaining important information from people who need it the most. He may have a variety of motives, but he seems to do it mostly out of shame. Quigley’s past actions may indeed have (unwillingly) caused Jacques Snicket’s death. Let’s start our trial after the cut.

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That’s what life is, pretty much: full of holes and tangles and ways to get stuck. Uncomfortable and itchy. A present you never asked for, never wanted, never chose. A present you’re supposed to be excited to wear, day after day, even when you’d rather stay in bed and do nothing.
—  Lauren Oliver, Vanishing Girls

Does anyone else remember reading that creepy story called “The Girl with the Green Ribbon Around Her Neck” from that An I Can Read book called “In a Dark, Dark Room,” and Other Scary Stories as a kid? That story fucked me up as a little kid, and even if I read it today it would still probably make me cringe. Now that I’m older, my biggest question is how the fuck did her husband, Alfred, never notice that his wife’s head was being held on her neck by a green ribbon the whole time? It’s not like Jenny superglued her head on before tying it with that green ribbon because when he untied it at the end it just fell right off. Wouldn’t Jenny’s head look at least a little bit wobbly, just being held together by a flimsy green ribbon? Also, poor Alfred. How did he explain the dismembered head in his house to the police after he untied the ribbon from Jenny’s neck, her head fell off, and she presumably died afterwards? How would they ever find him innocent of killing her, and how would they ever believe the truth about his wife basically being a zombie? This story makes no damn sense! It’s full of plot holes, and yet it freaked me out so much!

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YA LIT MEME: ( 9 | 10 ) series or books — The Walled City by Ryan Graudin

“My life has been full of these small things. Clothes without holes. Boots that fit. My first real mattress. Chma lounging in sun slants and dust motes. New, not-molding books. Bowls of rice porridge every morning. Classes with chalkboards. Dai rumpling my hair every time he sees me and talking about how long it’s getting. My sister smiling again. The small things add up.”

That’s what life is, pretty much: full of holes and tangles and ways to get stuck. Uncomfortable and itchy. A present you never asked for, never wanted, never chose. A present you’re supposed to be excited to wear, day after day, even when you’d rather stay in bed and do nothing.
That’s what life is, pretty much: full of holes and tangles and ways to get stuck. Uncomfortable and itchy. A present you never asked for, never wanted, never chose. A present you’re supposed to be excited to wear, day after day, even when you’d rather stay in bed and do nothing.
—  Lauren Oliver, Vanishing Girls
Small Sacrifices

I carried anxiety, held it with shaky hands
pushed it gently to my cheek and sighed,
you were so small
and my life was full of holes

the future looked empty
as universes passed us by
nothing hid away for rainy days
but your smile kept me dreaming

I made a pact with you and god
harden me with armor
let me eat fear from a plate
let me wear the superhero cape…just once

and then the child grew into summer
life became an epic turning into fall
I dressed  you with a kiss
on that first day of school


It’s weird how easy it is to fall
for people when you’re not looking–
I guess life is full of trap holes that
take you in if you don’t watch your step.
I wonder if in a farfetched way,
Alice in Wonderland was really
a metaphor about falling in love and
Lewis Caroll just didn’t know what to
make of it so he found the Hatter
and the Queen of Hearts and the
White Rabbit and the Cheshire Cat
and all the other characters to make
sense of all the chaos– I wonder why 
people never seem to question the
absolute craziness that is love.
I guess you don’t have time to
question anything when you’re falling.
—  A Hypothesis About Alice