a knight at the crossroads

Viktor Vasnetsov (1848-1926)
“A Knight At the Crossroads” (1878)
Oil on canvas
Symbolism
Located in the Museum of Russian Art, Minneapolis, Minnesota

So I’m stuck on the flower quest in Hollow Knight and I have to give the game credit for not only making a very difficult escort quest but one that I feel awful about being bad at in that my efforts to let this poor lady grieve her dead lover in peace I have brought about the senseless destruction of numerous heartfelt memorial gifts.

Grey Mourner, I’m so sorry that I’m apparently the only delivery service in Hallownest who can do this for you and I’m even sorrier that this many things want to maul me.

Maybe the Knight should just like. fill some orange balloons with water and tape them to weird places on their body to convince the infected they are One Of Them. 

Viktor Vasnetsov’s “A Knight at the Crossroads” (1882, oil on canvas). This is the second version of the painting.

A more exact translation of the Russian title would be “A Vityaz at a Fork in the Road”. The painting is an illustration to a common motif of Russian folk fairy tales, when a hero comes to a fork in the road and sees a menhir with an inscription, kind of: “If you ride to the left, you will lose your horse, if you ride to the right, you will lose your head”

5

The offer the King of Hell just proposed was not what you had expected. Sure, you knew things would go bad when you had arrived at the crossroads, had burried your box consisting the usual things for a crossroad deal and had waited for a demon to show up to seal your deal in order to save your brothers asses’ from burning in Hell after their deaths. But then the King of Hell himself had arrived. He had listened to your story, nodding here and there, and afterwards he had offered you a way out:

‘‘I will save your brothers from Hell’s wraith, (Y/n), if, and only if, you will become a knight if Hell.’‘

You were sure your mouth had dropped the moment the words had left his mouth.

‘‘When?’‘ You mumbled eventually, not really wanting to know the asnwer.

‘‘Right now.’‘

You knew there was no way back. If you really wanted to protect your brothers, you had to do this. There was no arguing with Crowly, he had made that pretty clear in the past. Deal or no deal.

‘‘…Deal,’‘ you spoke softly after a minute. You felt Crowly seeling the deal with the usual kiss, before you got surrounded by a darkness you had never felt before. But it didn’t scare you. In fact, you felt peaceful. Wih a sight, you felt something inside you change, as the darkness took possesion of you. When you opened your eyes again a few minutes or hours later, you weren’t really sure, they were pitch black.

‘‘Come on, (Y/n) Winchester,’‘ you heard Crolwy speak, but it sounded far away. ‘‘Let’s go take a howl at that moon.’‘

(Gifs not mine)

6

ART HISTORY MEME > [1/8] mythology

A Russian folklore has found its painter in the face of Viktor Vasnetsov. He was one of the first to find his way to the past, reflect it on the canvas and he has showed it to people, making them witnesses of the fairytales.

Samolet (Carpet) (1880), Bogatyrs (1881), The Unsmiling Tsarevna (1926), Snow Maiden (1899), A Knight At the Crossroads (1878), Gamaun, The prophetic bird (1897), The Frog Tsarevna(1918), Sirin and Alkonost The Birds of Joy and Sorrow (1896), Ivan Tsarevich Riding the Grey Wolf (1889)

lilygigg  asked:

Sweet baby Jesus you like Hellsing?? Yes good I like you even more :D

I fucking love Hellsing. Granted, most of that is residual love that’s still rattling around inside me from about…oh, I don’t know, eighth grade or so? but yeah no, I used to be one of those slightly greasy Hot Topic babies camped out in the manga aisle at the bookstore, up to my elbows in the messy grotesque art of that goddamn series. I really felt like I was getting away with something, I used to hold the pages close to my chest when someone passed by. 

in hindsight, I think what I was getting away with was a straight shot of kink. right in the veins. I don’t think Hellsing meant to be quite (quite) as kinky and like–illicitly hot as it was? I always got the impression it was aiming For Boys, what with all the tits and gore and guns and revisionist supernatural WWII stuff. but uh. maybe the target ended up being a little wider than that. 

it’s hard to even describe it exactly, but I know I wasn’t the only teenage girl who ended up in sort of a knot over the series. like, here, this is just a sampling: there’s this deeply enforced master/servant relationship between a lady knight (who exists at this crossroads of female self-presentation that I think gave many young lesbians a big “ding” moment) and her vampire–dog, I think, is the best word. this terrifying arcane beast who rips her enemies apart with his teeth, and comes to heel at her command, and clearly clearly gets off on the dynamic. he crawls to her on his knees with the darkness of hell yawning open in his wake and she feeds him a drop of her blood and they never touch one another, and frankly it’s still a bit too much for me. there’s this lingering, fetish-y attention paid to the shape of guns, and to gloved hands. there’s binding rituals and monstrous transformation and a vampire fledgling who has this whirlwind of sexualized daddy issues that manifest in whether or not she can allow herself to drink blood like her sire encourages. everyone is in tight suits or billowing silk neckties or leather straightjackets, and double-jointed or their eyes are glowing or they’re licking things and look, I was a kid and this was all pretty overwhelming. 

and like. I don’t think this was the intention! but holy hell, this manga and anime slammed into a small female subset of my generation like a runaway train, and gave us all, you know. stuff to think about.

being thirteen is fucking weird. 

but just imagine Bela being the Queen of the Crossroads, ever since Crowley gave up the title to be King of Hell

and she never liked him, so when she hears that Abaddon is back and looking to rule Hell (because hey, this is Bela Talbot we’re talking about and of course she knows everything about Hell) she’s estastic

and when she goes to Abaddon, the Queen is put off by the Crossroad Demon trying to ally with her, because Hell doesn’t need saleswomen, but Bela proves herself worthy by kneeling between her Queen’s legs and eating her out messy and enthusiastically, before she shares her ideas to help Abaddon gain favour and claim the throne

and when Crowley is dead, Abaddon and Bela rule Hell as the Queen of the Crossroads and the Queen of the Knights

Viktor Vasnetsov’s “A Knight at the Crossroads” (1878, oil on canvas). This is his first version of the painting, a second followed in 1882.

A more exact translation of the Russian title would be “A Vityaz at a Fork in the Road”. The painting is an illustration to a common motif of Russian folk fairy tales, when a hero comes to a fork in the road and sees a menhir with an inscription, kind of: “If you ride to the left, you will lose your horse, if you ride to the right, you will lose your head”