a different world a different story

me: man idk if i ever want to dm

me, now: hashing out an entire world where i can run oneshots potentially, with different players and characters getting to run through different short stories and maybe even here about/deal with the consequences of other player parties doing Fuckshit

this year’s emmy awards are proof that diverse storytelling is so necessary and worthwhile. when people are given a voice, when they’re given the opportunity, they create the most incredible content and it shows when they win the awards, too. san junipero and lena waithe are out here winning awards centred around lgbt stories. riz ahmed and donald glover and sterling k brown winning their categories. reed morano winning for best director of a drama series. big little lies fucking sweeping the board. the handmaid’s tale winning best drama series.

there’s still such a huge problem in on screen representation but tonight is proof that we need to demand more stories told by more people. we need stories that highlight complex and different women. stories about complex and different people of colour. stories about complex and different lgbt characters. 

give us the chance to create and we will create something amazing for the world to share.

the-spockicorn  asked:

Hi, I’ve been considering starting a book in the fantasy genre. I really wanted to give some Native American representation in it, since it's something that I rarely see. However, this story wouldn't take place in America, it would be in a completely different world (though one loosely based off of earth in the 14 hundreds ish?) This is similar to your mixing cultures post, but I wanted to know: is there a good way to give Native American representation in stories that aren’t historical fiction?

Representing PoC in Fantasy When Their Country/Continent Doesn’t Exist

The core of this question is something we’ve gotten across a few different ethnicities, and it basically boils down to: “how can I let my readers know these people are from a certain place without calling them by this certain place?” Aka, how can I let people know somebody is Chinese if I can’t call them Chinese, or, in your case, some Native American nation without having a North America.

Notes on Language

As I have said multiple times, there is no such thing as “Native American culture”. It’s an umbrella term. Even if you are doing fantasy you need to pick a nation and/or confederacy.

Step One

How do you code somebody as European?

This sounds like a very silly question, but consider it seriously.

How do you?

They probably live in huts or castles; there are lords and kings and knights; they eat stew and bread and drumsticks; they celebrate the winter solstice as a major holiday/new year; women wear dresses while men wear pants; there are pubs and farms and lots of wheat; the weather is snowy in winter and warm in summer.

Now swap all those components out for whatever people you’re thinking about.

Iroquois? They live in longhouses; there is a confederacy and democracy and lots of warriors from multiple nations; they eat corn, beans, and squash (those three considered sacred and grown together), with fish and wild game; they wear mostly leather garments with furs in winter; there are nights by the fire and cities and the rituals will change by the nation (remember the Iroquois were a confederacy made up of five or six tribes, depending on period); the weather is again snowy in winter and warm in summer.

Chinese? They harvest rice; there is an emperor appointed by the gods and scholars everywhere; they use a lunar calendar and have a New Year in spring; their trade ships are huge and their resources are plenty; they live in wood structures with paper walls or mud brick; they use jade and ivory for talismans; their culture is hugely varied depending on the province; their weather is mostly tropical, with monsoons instead of snow on lowlands, but their mountains do get chilly.

You get the gist.

Break down what it is that makes a world read as European (let’s be honest, usually English and Germanic) to you, then swap out the parts with the appropriate places in another culture.

Step Two

Research, research, research. Google is your friend. Ask it the questions for “what did the Cree eat” and “how did Ottoman government work.” These are your basics. This is what you’ll use to figure out the building blocks of culture.

You’ll also want to research their climate. As I say in How To Blend Cultures, culture comes from climate. If you don’t have the climate, animals, plants, and weather down, it’ll ring false.

You can see more at So You Want To Save The World From Bad Representation.

Step Three

Start to build the humans and how they interact with others. How are the trade relations? What are the internal attitudes about the culture— how do they see outsiders? How do outsiders see them? Are there power imbalances? How about greed and desire to take over?

This is where you need to do even more research on how different groups interacted with others. Native American stories are oftentimes painful to read, and I would strongly suggest to not take a colonizer route for a fantasy novel.

This does, however, mean you might not be researching how Natives saw Europeans— you’ll be researching how they saw neighbours. 

You’ll also want to look up the social rules to get a sense for how they interacted with each other, just for character building purposes.

Step Four

Sensitivity readers everywhere! You’ll really want to get somebody from the nation to read over the story to make sure you’ve gotten things right— it’s probably preferable to get somebody when you’re still in the concept stage, because a lot of glaring errors can be missed and it’s best to catch them before you start writing them.

Making mistakes is 100% not a huge moral failing. Researching cultures without much information on them is hard. So long as you understand the corrections aren’t a reflection on your character, just chalk them up to ignorance (how often do most writers get basic medical, weapon, or animal knowledge wrong? Extremely often). 

Step Five

This is where you really get into the meat of creating people. You’ve built their culture and environment into your worldbuilding, so now you have the tools you need to create characters who feel like part of the culture.

You’ll really want to keep in mind that every culture has a variety of people. While your research will say people roughly behave in a certain way, people are people and break cultural rules all the time. Their background will influence what rules they break and how they relate to the world, but there will be no one person who follows every cultural rule down to the letter. 

Step Six

Write!

Step Seven

More sensitivity readers! See step 4 for notes.

Step Eight

Rewrite— and trust me, you will need to. Writing is rewriting.

Repeat steps seven and eight until story is done.

Extra Notes

I’ll be honest— you’re probably going to need a certain amount of either goodwill (if you’re lucky enough to make friends within the group you’re trying to represent— but seriously, please do not make friends with us for the sole purpose of using us as sensitivity readers. It’s not nice) and/or money to get to publishing level. 

The good part is the first three steps are free, and these first three steps are what will allow you to hurt others less when you approach. While you’ll still likely make mistakes, you’ll make a few less (and hopefully no glaring ones, but it can/does happen) so long as you do your due diligence in making sure you at least try to understand the basics.

And once you feel like you’ve understood the basics… dive down even deeper because chances are you’re about to reach a tipping point for realizing how little you know.

People will always find you did something wrong. You will never get culture 100% accurate— not even people who were born and raised in it will, because as I said in step five: cultures have a huge variety of people in them, so everyone will interact with it differently. But you can work your hardest to capture one experience, make it as accurate as possible, and learn more for next time.

~ Mod Lesya 

Sadly in the London Production [the chandelier] falls very slowly because of Health and Safety. I always wanted to have a block of seats in the middle of the stalls that were 50p each and you had to sign a form, saying “I sit in this seat at my own risk” and really have the chandelier belting down.

In the Australian Production - naturally, them being Australians - the chandelier comes down at a hundred miles an hour and stops an inch above the heads of the audience, and is much more exciting.

I’ve seen chandeliers fall now at productions all over the world and you can kind of tell which country you’re in by the speed of the chandelier.

—  Richard Stilgoe, Co-Lyricist on Andrew Lloyd-Webber’s Phantom of the Opera [in regard to his feelings on the Falling of the Chandelier and International Productions]

one of my favorite things about malec is that they’re an adult, interracial lgbt couple. i know for many people in the lgbt community, coming out and coming into themselves didn’t happen until adulthood, especially poc. this includes me.

it means so much to me to see magnus, a man of color, and his recently-out boyfriend alec, living openly while cultivating their careers, managing familial relationships and making a home together. 

One thing people tend to miss when writing smart/gifted characters is how much being smart/gifted in a family of smart/gifted people can mess with your perceptions. I was doing multivariable calculus at 16, and I’m the worst at math in my family, so I tend to think of myself as bad–or at least not very good–at math. A musically gifted person with musically gifted older siblings may compare themselves to their older sibling’s current skills and feel inadequate, even if they are surpassing where that sibling was when they were that age. Alternatively, a musically gifted person with musically gifted younger siblings may feel inadequate or like a failure when their younger siblings reach a milestone earlier. Someone who can read five languages may feel inadequate growing up with parents who read seven. 

Additionally, families where different people are highly gifted in different areas will likely see times and places where one skill is prioritized or more highly valued. Someone who’s an amazing programmer may be more highly valued than a sibling who’s an amazing writer, because programming is a more highly valued (and highly paid) skill in the world today. A singer may be more highly valued than an instrumentalist.

Think, in your stories, about what that would do to a character, being in a family like that.

RT Fan Gothic
  • A man sneezes while five other men are talking over him. You know exactly which one sneezed. 
  • Your brain is now unsure if someone has actually said this or if you can hear their voice in your head.
  • There is a cult for an editor. We are all members of said cult. We all bring our hands together above our heads. We worship this editor. PE/\KE. SPE/\K. P E /\ K E S P E /\ K
  • There is an infinite number of Adams. 
  • You click on a video that is 10 minutes long. You black out and come to hours later, watching a different, but similar video.
  • You are called a shizno and you feel insulted. You do not know what this word means, but you are insulted.
  • All your money is disappearing. You don’t know where it’s going, nor do you remember spending it, but merchandise keeps showing up on your doorstep. You have so much merchandise. Your room is covered with so many posters that they cover the windows. No way in. No way out. You only wear merchandise now. 
  • One man is constantly constantly shirtless and this is not questioned.
  • You wanted to watch a silly show about soldiers in a canyon. You didn’t know what you were signing up for. It wasn’t this. Anything but this. 
  • There are two pairs of Joel and Adams and no one ever knows which one a person is referring to.
  • There are screencaps of tweets on tumblr before the staff has even tweeted it.
  • Another hypothetical situation has been discussed. They must have hundreds of millions of dollars at this point.
  • A man is impregnated with an alien child, but this is fine. This is perfectly normal. This child grows up and plays on the basketball team. This is perfectly normal.
  • You feel the strange compulsion to add “as dicks” to everything you say.
  • There have been terrible, terrible things done For The Kids.
  • For some reason the dynamite is kind.
  • Certain state names make you cry.
  • One man is simultaneously the dumbest and smartest person alive. You do not question this.
  • A different man is at once a murderous dark god, a loving husband, and a gigantic nerd. This, too, is never questioned.
  • There are four of the exact same person. Not cloned, however. The clones are a different story we must never speak of.
  • Everything is also a gun.
  • You must pick a team in the great battle of red versus blue. Friendships have been ruined over picking the wrong team. There is no remaining neutral. 
  • No one thinks twice about giving a child access to weapon gun hybrids, nor do they reconsider letting them fight the monsters of the world. Clearly, a man has made many, many mistakes.
  • You do not know who this drunk man declaring that he is the cheese master is, but you accept his mastery of cheese.
  • We wonder why we’re here. We see it as one of life’s greatest mysteries.
Why Do You Not Want to Represent Us?

A Discussion on Culture and Erasure

WWC frequently receives asks wondering if it’s alright to have PoC distant from their culture, outright not having one— or even if it’s okay to make something up to fit what the person wants to write about. And we feel the need to ask: why? Why do you only want our looks, our cultural trappings, without ever having a culture? Why do you want to perpetuate the pain of assimilation, of abuse, of violence? Why do you wish to create something “better” for your own gains, instead of taking us as we are?

That is what you are doing, every time you do not put in all of us, or create something to fit your own whims over our reality. We are more than our skin and outward appearance of difference. We are more than a collection of traits. We are more than stereotypes of what you think we are. Our ethnicities colour every aspect of our lives and, while we aren’t thinking about it all the time, we are aware of it. We were built by it. We live it every day. 

Representation is more than simply “I have brown people.” It is “I have this segment of culture respected in my story.” It means “this character is me”, which means this character must be built by the same factors that built us— our culture. Our real culture, not modified with “artistic licence” to make a “better” plot.

By stripping us of our ethnicities, you are stripping away our hearts. You are stripping away our homes. You are writing stories that simply remind us the world sees our bodies and cultures as playthings. As if our souls can be fragmented and split apart so you can tell yourself “I’m being diverse.” How can you say that when we do not see ourselves in your work? You are not doing anyone any justice. You have failed to understand the concept of what representation even is: a person’s life in media.

While we are no different from the majority in terms of our minds, our passions, our ideas, we are different in where we come from. Our experience was shaped by our culture and in order to show us as true characters, you must give your own characters our ethnicity’s history. Our comforts will be different from yours because we grew up being comforted by different things. Our favourites will be different because we hold different things at higher value.

Assimilating us with your actions— refusing to do the proper work involved to truly build a character of Color with as rich a background as white characters— simply perpetuates the pain of being marginalized. It’s lazy. 

That also isn’t to say that people without complex relationships to their ethnicities exist, but ask yourself: are you the person to tell this story? Chances are, you are not. Leave narratives of pain to the people who’ve lived it, where they belong. We are not your stock plots. 

Respect us enough to take all of us, not just the parts you want. To do anything else would be an injustice.

- WWC

13 Reasons Why controversy

Because the response to 13 Reasons Why has been so controversial, I’d just like to point out some things.

As explained in 13 Reasons Why: Beyond the Reasons, the suicide scene was shown BECAUSE they wanted it to be painful for the audience to watch, as well as the rape scenes. Not because they wanted to be gruesome or inconsiderate, but because it is REALITY for so many people in the world and a lot of people like to pretend these things don’t exist or shield themselves from the reality of it; they ignore it because they’ve never gone through it, so they don’t care so much. So then when they see these scenes, they will be made uncomfortable and see what people are really truly experiencing and that it is not something that should at all be sugarcoated or ignored. IT IS REAL.

Secondly, for those saying it’s disgusting for them to show these scenes, THERE ARE WARNINGS AT THE BEGINNING OF THE EPISODES THAT SHOW RAPE AND/OR SUICIDE TO NOT WATCH IF IT WILL AFFECT THE VIEWER IN ANY WAY. These warnings are given specifically so that if you are not comfortable watching or believe it would cause a trigger, you should not even watch. So the fact that people are bashing the show for showing these scenes in relation to them being a trigger, the warnings are already made very clear in the beginning. They did take this step to make sure it wouldn’t just pop up and be any sort of triggers. The producers knew very well to be wary of that.
The show also worked with a lot of psychiatrists, psychologists, and leading experts in teen-suicide prevention. Though this still may not be enough for you to think they did everything right, they again did have the warnings. They are very aware that it could cause triggers and put some people in danger, but THAT IS WHAT THE WARNINGS ARE FOR. DO NOT WATCH IF IT COULD DANGER YOU. VIEWER’S DISCRETION IS ALWAYS ADVISED.

THE SHOW WAS NOT CREATED FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES. IT IS TO SPREAD AWARENESS FOR ALL THE ISSUES (suicide, rape, bullying) AND POINT OUT HOW LITTLE THE SIGNS CAN BE AND HOW MUCH MORE CAREFUL AND HELPFUL EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO BE TO THE PEOPLE AROUND US. As also talked about in Beyond the Reasons, they want to promote teaching boys the proper ways to approach a girl and gain permission to become intimate with her, always getting the YES to teach boys respect for women. This is very important because as most people know, it has always been extremely hard for rape victims to get help because of the “what were you wearing” “were you flirting” “did you lead him on” “did you directly say no” arguments that are so wrongfully executed—instead, 13 Reasons Why knows that this is an issue, as somewhat shown in the scene with Mr. Porter as he questions Hannah. So in the after show, they speak about how parents need to be teaching their children more about consent and less about just protecting yourself, covering up, etc. They are aware that the real issue is with proper consent, and that is a very important message to get across.

Coming from someone who has battled depression and suicidal thoughts and attempts, I must also point out that EVERY SINGLE PERSON, EXPERIENCES, THOUGHTS, REACTIONS, ETC ARE DIFFERENT. What one person suffering depression thinks may be different than another. Hannah Baker’s story is very unique in many ways yet also extremely relatable in many ways to many, many people and girls around the world. JUST BECAUSE YOUR STORY MAY BE DIFFERENT DOES NOT MEAN HERS IS INCORRECT OR LESS/MORE THAN ANOTHER’S. There are a lot of people who can relate to feeling as though you are NOTHING and of no worth to the people around you, just a burden that only disappoints everyone and makes their lives worse. This is a very real state of being and depression and feeling of complete worthlessness that people can reach in their lives, especially some young teenage girls, like Hannah Baker, and even myself, that will lead to suicidal thoughts, attempts, or completely following through with, like Hannah. They believe the world and their loved ones would be better off without them. Again, as someone who has attempted suicide as a teenager and worked for years to fight depression and overcome it, I can say that while the suicide scene did make me uncomfortable and was extremely painful to watch, I was not offended. I knew of the warning at the beginning of the episode, read it, and continued to watch because EVERYONE HANDLES THESE THINGS DIFFERENTLY. I UNDERSTOOD the purpose of including the scene and making it so graphic and realistic. IT’S REALITY, THIS IS HAPPENING TO PEOPLE EVERYDAY AND IT SHOULD NOT BE SUGARCOATED OR SHIELDED FROM THE WORLD; it needs to be made more AWARE OF by those who like to turn a blind eye to it, but it is exposed WITH WARNING. So again, if some feel as though a scene like this would be a trigger, IT IS ADVISED YOU DO NOT WATCH. Everyone is affected differently and they did not just insert it with no consideration for the affect it could have on those battling the same wars as Hannah.

To say Clay was an easy solution and could have saved Hannah by loving her—no, he could not have saved her by just loving her, that is not what this story is even saying. Hannah does explain at the end of her last tape as she exits the school that some people cared, but she felt it was only mediocre, not enough for her to want to stay and feel NEEDED and truly LOVED. So no, they are not saying Clay could have kept her alive by simply loving her, or that love can save someone, it is much more complex than that. What they are saying is that people can care, but not showing how much they truly care can affect someone in the ways it affected Hannah. It was not just one boy’s love that could have saved her, but the love and care of many people, for them to show that they truly cared about her being alive and DID NOT see her as worthless, an object, just another person on earth. She needed to feel as though they NEEDED her to stay, that they genuinely cared about her as a person and that her life was truly worth something, because she did not feel it was. When Clay says he could have kept her alive if he wasn’t so afraid to tell her he loved her, he simply means he could have given her a sense of hope, a sense of belonging on the earth, that someone truly, whole-heartedly valued her life and her as a human being, not an object.

The actress who plays Jessica also explained that she reached out to a family member who is an actual rape survivor, and she stated that she was pleased that the show was “not shying away from the ugliness” of these scenes because viewers will see what these people really go through–again, another topic that is usually sugarcoated and instead needs to be addressed.

13 Reasons Why is a unique way of telling the story of a teenage girl who committed suicide, and the reasoning for bringing it to screen was MOSTLY to promote awareness and shine light on things that are not talked about enough that the youth suffers every single day, things adults see as “normal teenager struggles,” “small stuff,” “it only feels like the end of the world and really isn’t,” etc. This show is being spread more than even expected, and that is a very good thing for those who are in need of help and have parents or peers that once ignored their problems and will now tend to them.


**an issue cannot be tended to/made aware of/more properly prevented if it is just sugarcoated rather than slapped in people’s faces (those who don’t realize how severe it is) like this show does. it can really change things and leave an impact.

**if you are at risk for triggers and do not feel you are currently healthy enough to watch this show, please take care of yourself and do not watch. or, skip episodes 9, 12, and 13 and read up on them instead. these are the episodes that can be triggers for those at risk, if you weren’t yet aware.

**also feel free to stop by my inbox and talk to me if you need someone to talk to, or just would like to speak more on the subject.

2

Not one more fan meeting, one precious life being saved (x)

Don’t think about how this crossover episode could have gone if Karolsen were still established. Two healthy, interracial relationships getting paralleled. Two reporter women who are independent and strong and loving. Two men who love their girlfriends more than anything in this world or a parallel one and know that they can do anything. 

Don’t think about how it would have been Iris and James, the two human Black people in the relationships, who got to save their superhuman SOs in this episode and be the heroes this time. 

Don’t think about if James Olsen had a counterpart in Earth 1 who is also a world-renowned journalist that Iris West absolutely looks up to and is totally starstruck (even though she knows that this is a different James Olsen). Don’t think about James Olsen telling her that being a good journalist isn’t about getting the most glory or being the first to find a good story, but about making telling the truth, no matter how hard it is, and hoping that the story the facts tell can inspire everyone who reads it to do the right thing and make a difference in their own way. Don’t think about James Olsen making sure Iris knows that she is just as much a hero as the Flash, even without a superpower. 

Don’t think about James Olsen and Iris West groaning to each other about all of the stupid shit their respective partners can get into when they’re in full-on hero mode. Don’t think about them commiserating with each other about how scary it is when they put themselves in the line of fire and they can’t do anything about it, but loving them enough to never force them to choose between love of their job and love of their partner. 

Don’t think about how special and groundbreaking this episode could have been in comparison with how ugly and dumb it actually was.

why did yuuri take no drunk selfies at the banquet? why does he have no pictures of him holding onto viktor, tie around his head, laughter in both of their eyes? why is his the only phone with no evidence? how did viktor not demand yuuri not leave without at least a selfie together?

another piece of writing advice

the more knowledge and experiences you have the better you’ll be at writing

if you don’t have a ton of experiences, you need to at least do research and read (yes, read) a lot

you can’t expect to become a professional writer if you sit in your room all day and only consume modern YA fiction and MCU movies. You have to consume literature and cinema with actual weight to it

All of this builds a foundation for your writing ability. 

Writing fiction isn’t really anything but ‘creating a fake world’ and if you don’t know anything about the real one you won’t be able to make an engaging fake. So do research. About history, government, society, social interaction, all that. Just like building anything, you need to know how it’s structured, so read a lot as well. Consume many stories by different authors in different genres and try to see how they’re built, what their parts are.

Research isn’t just something you do when you need a character you decided was smart to drop a factoid or something. Don’t just make assumptions about how things and organizations work. Don’t assume you know how a hospital functions before writing something in a hospital; do research. Don’t assume, even if you’ve seen it on TV. 

Try to gain an understanding of things, rather than just superficially absorbing information. Once you understand how something is, think about WHY it is. Everything has a reason. Once you get good at thinking about the reasons why things exist you can use that when crafting your world and give it a much richer and more genuine feeling than if you didn’t.

Example: If you’re writing a story about two nations at war, you have to consider why they’re at war. “The ruler of one is a bad guy” isn’t a good reason. Wars are incredibly costly and their outcome is never guaranteed no matter what the difference in military force is. Think why the war is happening. Is the aggressor interested in some resource? Is it an ideological war? What drove this situation to outright war? Why is this a hot war instead of a cold one? The list goes on.

This even goes down to a personal level. “This person acts this way” why do they act this way? Try to figure it out, even if the audience won’t have that reason revealed to them. It’ll make the portrayal of them much more realistic and people will accept them as ‘real’ better.

ew.com
'Wayward Sisters': Get the first details on the 'Supernatural' spin-off
Samantha Highfill | October 13, 2017 at 9:55am EDT

In  June, The CW announced Wayward Sisters,
 a potential Supernatural spin-off — with a backdoor pilot set to air as Supernatural‘s first episode of 2018 — about a group of troubled women who’ve all been orphaned by supernatural tragedy. Led by the late Jimmy Novak’s daughter, Claire (Kathryn Love Newton), and under the training of sheriffs Jody Mills (Kim Rhodes) and Donna Hanscum (Briana Buckmaster), they’ll become a monster-fighting force. “This is an opportunity to do something in the world of Supernatural that has some of the sensibilities of Supernatural but addresses a lot of issues, scenarios, and characters that are very different,” executive producer Andrew Dabb says.

It all begins when Claire comes home. “Claire went out, she kicked ass on her own, but a crisis will occur that will force her back into the fold of the Wayward family,” EP Robert Berens explains. And though the show will have a similar feel to Supernatural — Kim Rhodes calls it a “perfect sibling” to the series — one of its biggest differences is location. While Supernatural is a road show, Wayward will be localized in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, a decision that Dabb says allows them to create a real community. “This is a place where romance can happen. Or rivalry,” he says.

Speaking of which, Claire arrives home to find that her caretaker, Jody, has taken in a new psychic named Patience (Clark Backo), the granddaughter of Missouri Moseley (Loretta Devine), and she won’t exactly be happy about it. “[Jody] is constantly saying, ‘My door is always open,’ and she does it again in episode 3 of this season where we meet Patience,” Rhodes says. Dabb adds that Patience will serve as the “eyes of the show” when she walks in as the new girl. “Everyone else is like, ‘Sometimes we do autopsies of monsters on the dinner table.’ She’s like, ‘That’s insane! That’s not a thing people do.’ She’s there to offer a little bit of perspective.”

Rounding out the family is Alex (Katherine Ramdeen), the first girl Jody took in and the closest thing she has to a daughter, and Kaia (Yadira Guevara-Prip), 
a new addition who has the ability to walk between worlds in her dreams. “Kaia has been on her own for a long time,” Dabb says. “She’s not sure who she can trust, but she starts to form certain bonds and relationships that make it clear that this is the place she needs to be.” One of those bonds will be with Claire, whom Kathryn Love Newton reveals saves Kaia’s life when they first come into contact. “She wants to keep Kaia safe,” Newton says. “It’s really important to her, and you’ll find out why.”

As for Kaia’s ability to walk between worlds, Newton says the story “does have a little more of a fantasy vibe” than Supernatural, though it still has what she calls the “core Supernatural dynamic.” As Berens puts it, they approached the spin-off with the attitude of: “What’s a show that’s like Supernatural but different?” And although one of the key differences is the fact that this show features women at its center, Rhodes says it’s not “Supernatural with girls.” Rather, as she puts it, “It’s Supernatural with heroes that happen to be female.”

But unlike Supernatural, Wayward features a much larger support system for the central characters, a key detail for the writers. “What is possible if you have more than just a sibling relationship to guide you through this process,” Berens says. “Could it be different? Could it be less psychologically and physically damaging than what we’ve seen Sam and Dean go through? That’s a really core question of the show.”

Speaking of Sam and Dean, there is a reason why they don’t just show up and help out. Rhodes promises, “It’s made very clear why this is happening without Sam and Dean, although there’s a beautiful opportunity for them to come visit.”

After all, Jody’s door is always open.

2

Femininity Means Power for Blair Cherelstein

This post is in celebration of Women’s History Month. Throughout March, we’ll be highlighting the stories of women doing extraordinary things around the world.

By all standards, Blair Cherelstein (@blurchur) leads the life of your average 22-year-old. “I wake up, I go to class, my job, my internship,” says Blair, a film major in West Virginia. “There’s this misperception that trans people operate under a different way of life, but I don’t do anything that a cis person [someone who identifies with their birth sex] would do differently in their day.” Having known since the age of 4 that she was a girl who happened to be born with the body of a boy — “Health class was confusing as hell” — Blair started taking hormones more than four years ago to transition into the woman she is today. “To me, femininity means power,” says Blair. “I’m so proud of the sense of community I feel with other women.” In honor of International #WomensDay, Blair is going to keep it simple: “I just celebrate it by being in public and holding my girlfriend’s hand.”

reiversmusings  asked:

Is giving Dominaria a "cohesive identity" code for "turning it into a one trick pony" as you've been doing for every world you've invented in the post-8th edition era? Honestly, if that's the plan I'm fairly certain most of the people who've wanted you to go back would prefer you just not. Part of Dominaria's charm is being an actual developed world with different cultures.

All our worlds have depth. Each one has a cosmology with different creatures and cultures. A world guide about all the components is crafted for each world.

The people who love calling it a “World of Hats” are doing the same disservice as the people calling Jace a “Mary Sue”. It’s a snarky undermining of the incredible amount of hard work done by our creative team to make cool new worlds.

What our worlds are not are hodgepodge worlds with disparate parts that have no connection with one another.

“But that’s the way the real world is.” There’s a difference between what works in the real world and what works in stories. Real life is often unbelievable through the lens of story. I had umpteen writing classes drive this point home.

And even when our worlds have more distinction between the parts, Alara and Tarkir as examples, there’s a relationship between the parts.

There was no reason for Ice Age and Mirage to be on the same plane other than laziness on our part. Them co-existing on the same world did little to enhance one another.

When you have a Multiverse, it’s important that you craft your worlds so that the players can remember them, that they have some kind of identity. Star Wars and Star Trek treating their worlds like this was not a fluke but an important means to build a world where the pieces were memorable.

Here’s my counter argument to those who feel that worlds with lots of unconnected elements make for better worlds. Imagine we just clumped two consecutive worlds together. Amonkhet and a Kaladesh are one world and Innistrad and Zendikar are one world. And Tarkir and Theros.

Have we just made better worlds? Is part of the world optimistic steam punk with an Indian vibe and the other Bolas-crafted Egyptian inspired world, somehow make the world more sophisticated? Or is it just more cluttered and less distinct?

The reason it took us so long to return to Dominaria is we wanted to do it right. We wanted to be respectful of what the world was but bring to it a modern sensibility of being a world that had a cohesive identity rather than a hodgepodge of unrelated elements.

We did it though and in a way that is both respectful of what came before and productive in moving forward with a world that becomes part of our stable of worlds that doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb. Old fans, please have faith. We too love Dominaria.