a character that you want to know more about

You know what makes me sad about S7? We finally get S1 stuff (literally this is the same story and dynamics but that’s beside the point)—actual characters and plot in town WITHOUT magic and saviors and heart-ripping and poof-ing and mcguffins and exaliber and snow monsters and talismans and portals and the underworld and whatever other shiny thing the writers felt they needed to keep us entertained when really all most of us wanted was to watch our characters, not an out-of-control plot on speed.

I wish we saw more of this with the characters we love.

looking for some feedback

hey everyone! i am just looking for some feedback from my followers about my blog.

as someone who really values diversity, i try my best to implement it while i play and create sims; however, i am definetly not perfect at it. now, this is where my followers come in. i would appreciate if you guys messaged me regarding:

a) if there is a lack of representation of a certain identity/race/gender/ethnicity/personality/sexuality/etc.. on my blog that you would like to see more of

b) if you have criticism for a way i have portrayed a certain character or just about anything involving diversity on my blog in general (for example if one of my characters inaccurately portrays a certain identity please let me know)

c) just really any advice or criticism you could provide me with so that i can try to be as diverse as possible


thank you!! anon is on so you can message me things anonymously if you want. i will take everyone’s feedback very seriously and i appreciate any message you guys might send me!

anonymous asked:

oumakokichi tumblr com post 166327441530 is about ouma in localization vs oriiginal, although it's written by his fan and thus isn't impartial. it's still an interesting read though

(Thank you so much! It was really interesting! I love Kokichi even more now!!

If you know about the whole game and wants to know more about how Kokichi is really in the japanese game you should totally read this! (The translation changed really big things about his characters)

-mod lili)

7

AU Day has me yazzed i shit you not

So this AU (Guardian Signs Reverse AU) was inspired by @niki-chan234 // @nikirachan234 ‘s SOA Reverse AU – which is awesome and you should definitely check it out :D

This is all the art I’ve done for the GS AU, at least what I could find in my two most recent sketchbooks. If I can find the time to do more, I definitely will, but with school and everything, who knows?

Anyway, enjoy! I put some quick blurbs about the characters in this photoset under the “Keep Reading” as well as a list of who everyone is switched with (as of rn) if you want to check it out! 

happy pokemon ranger week! <33

Keep reading

The Door (Chapter 12)

An Undertale Fanfiction by: Topaz Shadowwolf
Undertale is owned by: Toby Fox
Setting: Post neutral run when Papyrus dies with chapter intros being before the child fell.
Relationships: Sans and Toriel is the main focus, with a little bit of Undyne and Alphys
Rating: I’m thinking Teen?
Heads up: There is some depressed thoughts, feelings of worthlessness/wanting to die, mention of major character death, and the occasional bad word. Oh, and flowey being flowey, so you know, psychological/physical trauma. I really don’t want to say much more since I really don’t want to spoil anything further down the road…

You can read it on AO3!
Here is Ch 11 Ch 10 Ch 9 Ch 8 Ch 7 Ch 6 Ch 5 Ch 4 Ch 3, Ch 2, and Ch 1on Tumbler.

Keep reading

I wasn’t tagged by anyone, but i stole this from @allskynostars and i felt like i wanted you guys to know more about me lol


Name: Morgan

Star Sign: Taurus

Average hours of sleep: Like 6-7 usually, though the last few nights have been like 4.

Lucky number: i don’t really have one but i’ll go with my birthdate. 25.

Last thing I googled: a Garth Brooks song

Favourite fictional character: hmmm there are so many. Jess Mariano(Gilmore Girls), Seth Cohen (the OC), and i’d have to say maybe Christina Yang(Grey’s Anatomy)

When did you start this blog: i think April or May

Amount of followers: 26 wonderful gems 💎💜

What do I post: Riverdale, Bughead, Lili, Cole, Dylan, random shit and fan fics 💕.

My OTP’s: bughead predominately.

Do I run any more blogs: nope!

Do I get a lot of asks: no, but i wish i did! i love interacting with other people on here 🤗😘

Why did I choose this url: well @cooperbettycooper got to 600 followers and had a url giveaway, and i picked this one. and i LOVE it.


idk if y’all have been tagged, but if you haven’t been i wanna see your answers 💕


@elegantmoonchild @sweaters-and-crowns @aisforr @findingbetty @a-girl-named-whiskey

imjustafuckinggirl  asked:

So, I don't know how to write pain like! What words do I use? how do I describe it! I really need some help here!

No problem! And sorry about not answering sooner, I was on vacation. To make it up to you, I’ve made one of my trademark Long Posts about it.


TIPS ON HOW TO WRITE PAIN (FOR BOTH ORIGINAL CONTENT WRITERS AND FANFICTION WRITERS)

When I first started writing, about eight years ago, I had the same issue as @imjustafuckinggirl.

How are you supposed to write about pain you’ve never experienced before???

The characters in my book suffer through all sorts of terrible shit, and in no way am I writing from experience, which is marginally easier to do than write about something that has never happened to you.

However, with time, I managed to gather up a few strategies on how to write pain.

1. Don’t Write Paragraphs About It

I know, it’s tempting. You want to convey to the reader just how much pain the character is in, and you think that the pain will be emphasized the more you write about it.

This, however, is a lie.

As a reader, when I’m reading a book or fanfiction where, whenever the writer uses agonizingly long paragraphs to describe when a character is hurt, I skip it.

Entirely.

It’s boring and, quite frankly, unnecessary, especially during a fight or huge battle, which are supposed to be fast-paced.

When it comes to writing about pain, it really is about quality and not quantity.

In my own writing, I stick to short, quick paragraphs, some of them which are barely a line long. This gives it a faster pace and sort of parallels with the scattered, spread out thoughts of the character as they suffer.

2. Describe it Right

Many times, usually in fanfiction, writers over-exaggerate certain injuries.

This partially has to do with the fact that they’ve never experienced that injury before and are just thinking about what it might feel like.

As a girl with two brothers and who often participated in rough play-fights, I can assure you that getting punched is not as painful as you think it is.

(However, it does depend on the area, as well as how hard the punch is, on top of the fact that you have to take into account whether or not the punch broke bones)

I’m reading a high school AU where a character gets punched by a bully (Idk where they got punched it wasn’t stated) and the author is describing it like they’d been shot.

It was to the point where I was like Did the bully have brass knuckles or something????

It was very clear that this author had never been punched before.

When describing the pain of an injury or the injury itself, you have to take into account:

- What object was used to harm the character

- Where the injury is

- How long the character has had the injury

- (For blades) How deep the cut is

- (For blunt force trauma) How hard the hit was

- Whether or not the wound triggers other things (Ex: Concussion, vomiting, dizziness, infection, internal/external bleeding).

There’s also the fact that when some authors described wounds caused by blades such as knives, daggers, and swords, they never take into account the anatomy of a person and which places cause the most blood flow.

Obviously, a cut on your cheek will have less of a blood flow than a cut on your wrist, depending on what the blade hits, and I hope that everyone consults a diagram of veins, capillaries, arteries, etc. when they’re describing blood flow from a certain place.

There’s also the fact that you have to take into account where the blood is coming from. Veins? Arteries?

The blood from arteries will be a brighter red, like vermilion, than the blood from veins, which is the dark crimson everyone likes to talk about.

Not all places gush bright red blood, people!

3. DIFFERENT INJURIES HAVE DIFFERENT KINDS OF PAIN

Here, let me explain.

A punch feels different from a slap.

A broken arm feels different from getting stabbed.

A fall feels different from a dog bite.

I’ll give you a list of all the kinds of things that can be described for the three most common kinds of injuries that happen in stories:

Punch/Blunt Force Trauma

How it feels:

- Aching

- Numbness (In the later stages)

- A single spike of pain before it fades into an ache

- Throbbing

Effects:

- Vomiting (If the character is punched in the gut)

- Swelling

- Bruising

- Broken bones

- Unconsciousness (Blow to the head)

- Dizziness (Blow to the head)

- Concussion (Also a blow to the head)

- Internal bleeding

- Death (In the case of concussions and internal bleeding and broken bones- ribs can pierce lungs)

Stab Wound/Cut

How it feels:

- Stinging (only shallow wounds have just stinging)

- Burning

- With stab wounds, I feel like describing the effects of it make it more powerfully felt by the reader

Effects:

- Bleeding (Consult chart of the circulatory system beforehand for the amount of blood flow that should be described and what color the blood should be)

- Dizziness (Heavy blood loss)

- Unconsciousness

- Infection (if left unattended)

- Death

Gunshot

How it feels:

- Depends on the caliber bullet, from how far away they were shot (point-blank range is nothing like being shot from a distance), and in what place. Do careful research and then make your decision.

Effects:

- Bleeding (Consult chart of the circulatory system beforehand for the amount of blood flow that should be described and what color the blood should be. Also take into effect the above variables for blood flow as well.)

- Dizziness (Heavy blood loss)

- Infection (if left unattended)

- Death

Some things that a character may do while they’re injured:

- Heavy/Harsh/Ragged breathing

- Panting

- Making noises of pain

  • gasping
  • grunting
  • hissing
  • groaning
  • whimpering
  • yelping (when the injury is inflicted)
  • screaming
  • shrieking
  • wailing

- Crying/ Weeping/Sobbing/Etc.

- Clenching their teeth

- Unable to speak

- Pressing their hands against a stab wound/cut to try and stem the bleeding

- Eyesight going out of whack (vision blurring and tilting, the room spinning, black spots consuming sight)

- Eyes rolling up into their head

- Trembling/shaking

- Ears riniging (from gunshot)


HOPE THIS HELPED!

The Dos and Don’ts of Beginning a Novel:  An Illustrated Guide

I’ve had a lot of asks lately for how to begin a book (or how not to), so here’s a post on my general rules of thumb for story openers and first chapters!  

Please note, these are incredibly broad generalizations;  if you think an opener is right for you, and your beta readers like it, there’s a good chance it’s A-OK.  When it comes to writing, one size does not fit all.  (Also note that this is for serious writers who are interested in improving their craft and/or professional publication, so kindly refrain from the obligatory handful of comments saying “umm, screw this, write however you want!!”)

So without further ado, let’s jump into it!

Don’t: 

1.  Open with a dream. 

“Just when Mary Sue was sure she’d disappear down the gullet of the monstrous, winged pig, she woke up bathed in sweat in her own bedroom.”

What?  So that entire winged pig confrontation took place in a dream and amounts to nothing?  I feel so cheated! 

Okay, not too many people open their novels with monstrous swine, but you get the idea:  false openings of any kind tend to make the reader feel as though you’ve wasted their time, and don’t usually jump into more meaty action of the story quickly enough.  It makes your opening feel lethargic and can leave your audience yawning.

Speaking of… 

2.  Open with a character waking up.  

This feels familiar to most of us, but unless your character is waking up to a zombie attack or an alien invasion, it’s generally a pretty easy recipe to get your story to drag.

No one picks a book to hear how your character brushes their teeth in the morning or what they’d like to have for dinner.  As a general rule of thumb, we read to explore things we wouldn’t otherwise get to experience.  And cussing out the alarm clock is not one of them.  

Granted, there are exceptions if your writing is exceptionally engaging, but in most cases it just sets a slow pace that will bore you and your reader to death and probably cause you to lose interest in your book within the first ten pages.  

3.  Bombard with exposition.  

Literary characters aren’t DeviantArt OCs.  And the best way to convey a character is not, in my experience, to devote the first ten pages to describing their physical appearance, personality, and backstory.  Develop your characters, and make sure their fully fleshed out – my tips on how to do so here – but you don’t need to dump all that on the reader before they have any reason to care about them.  Let the reader get to know the character gradually, learn about them, and fall in love with them as they would a person:  a little bit at a time.   

This is iffy when world building is involved, but even then it works best when the delivery feels organic and in tune with the book’s overall tone.  Think the opening of the Hobbit or Good Omens.

4.  Take yourself too seriously.

Your opener (and your novel in general) doesn’t need to be intellectually pretentious, nor is intellectual pretense the hallmark of good literature.  Good literature is, generally speaking, engaging, well-written, and enjoyable.  That’s it.  

So don’t concern yourself with creating a poetic masterpiece of an opening line/first chapter.  Just make one that’s – you guessed it – engaging, well-written, and enjoyable. 

5.  Be unintentionally hilarious.

Utilizing humor in your opening line is awesome, but check yourself to make sure your readers aren’t laughing for all the wrong reasons (this is another reason why betas are important.)  

These examples of the worst opening lines in published literature will show you what I mean – and possibly serve as a pleasant confidence booster as well: 

“As the dark and mysterious stranger approached, Angela bit her lip anxiously, hoping with every nerve, cell, and fiber of her being that this would be the one man who would understand – who would take her away from all this – and who would not just squeeze her boob and make a loud honking noise, as all the others had.”

– Ali Kawashima

“She sipped her latte gracefully, unaware of the milk foam droplets building on her mustache, which was not the peachy-fine baby fuzz that Nordic girls might have, but a really dense, dark, hirsute lip-lining row of fur common to southern Mediterranean ladies nearing menopause, and winked at the obviously charmed Spaniard at the next table.”

– Jeanne Villa

“As I gardened, gazing towards the autumnal sky, I longed to run my finger through the trail of mucus left by a single speckled slug – innocuously thrusting past my rhododendrons – and in feeling that warm slime, be swept back to planet Alderon, back into the tentacles of the alien who loved me.”

– Mary E. Patrick

“Before they met, his heart was a frozen block of ice, scarred by the skate blades of broken relationships, then she came along and like a beautiful Zamboni flooded his heart with warmth, scraped away the ugly slushy bits, and dumped them in the empty parking lot of his soul.”

– Howie McClennon

If these can get published, so can you.

Do:

1.  You know that one really interesting scene you’re itching to write?  Start with that.

Momentum is an important thing in storytelling.  If you set a fast, infectious beat, you and your reader will be itching to dance along with it.  

Similarly, slow, drowsy openers tend to lead to slow, drowsy stories that will put you both to sleep.

I see a lot of posts joking about “that awkward moment when you sit down to write but don’t know how to get to that one scene you actually wanted to write about.”  Write that scene!  If it’s at all possible, start off with it.  If not, there are still ways you can build your story around the scenes you actually want to write.

Keep in mind:  if you’re bored, your reader will almost certainly be bored as well.  So write what you want to write.  Write what makes you excited.  Don’t hold off until later, when it “really gets good.”  Odds are, the reader will not wait around that long, and you’re way more likely to become disillusioned with your story and quit.  If a scene is dragging, cut it out.  Burn bridges, find a way around.  Live, dammit. 

2.  Engage the reader.

There are several ways to go about this.  You can use wit and levity, you can present a question, and you can immerse the reader into the world you’ve created.  Just remember to do so with subtlety, and don’t try too hard;  believe me, it shows.  

Here are some of my personal favorite examples of engaging opening lines: 

“In the beginning, the universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move." 

– Douglas Adams, the Restaurant at the End of the Universe.

"It was the day my grandmother exploded.”

– Iain Banks, Crow Road.

“A white Pomeranian named Fluffy flew out of the a fifth-floor window in Panna, which was a grand-new building with the painter’s scaffolding still around it. Fluffy screamed.”

– Vikram Chandra, Sacred Games.

See what I’m saying?  They pull you in and do not let go.

3.  Introduce us to a main character (but do it right.)

“Shadow had done three years in prison. He was big enough and looked don’t-fuck-with-me enough that his biggest problem was killing time. So he kept himself in shape, and taught himself coin tricks, and thought a lot about how much he loved his wife.”

– Neil Gaiman, American Gods.

This is one of my favorite literary openings of all time, because right off the bat we know almost everything we need to know about Shadow’s character (i.e. that he’s rugged, pragmatic, and loving.)   

Also note that it doesn’t tell us everything about Shadow:  it presents questions that make us want to read more.  How did Shadow get into prison?  When will he get out?  Will he reunite with his wife?  There’s also more details about Shadow slowly sprinkled in throughout the book, about his past, personality, and physical appearance.  This makes him feel more real and rounded as a character, and doesn’t pull the reader out of the story.

Obviously, I’m not saying you should rip off American Gods.  You don’t even need to include a hooker eating a guy with her cooch if you don’t want to.  

But this, and other successful openers, will give you just enough information about the main character to get the story started;  rarely any good comes from infodumping, and allowing your reader to get to know your character gradually will make them feel more real.   

4.  Learn from the greats.

My list of my favorite opening lines (and why I love them) is right here.

5.  Keep moving.  

The toughest part of being a writer is that it’s a rare and glorious occasion when you’re actually satisfied with something you write.  And to add another layer of complication, what you like best probably won’t be what your readers will like best. 

If you refuse to keep moving until you have the perfect first chapter, you will never write anything beyond your first chapter.  

Set a plan, and stick to it:  having a daily/weekly word or page goal can be extremely helpful, especially when you’re starting out.  Plotting is a lifesaver (some of my favorite posts on how to do so here, here, and here.)

Keep writing, keep moving, and rewrite later.  If you stay in one place for too long, you’ll never keep going. 

Best of luck, and happy writing.  <3

Things I Would Like to See in Future Seasons of Voltron

* Paladin’s backstory- I /need/ to see their families. Lance’s siblings, all of their homes, where they grew up (and the mystery of Keith’s family and home).
* One episode dedicated to the paladins’ families- a glimpse into how they are coping to the loss, the story from their perspectives. Do they go to the Garrison to find answers?
* More Coran/Allura history- more Altean history, the traditions of their people and planet.
* LGBTQ+ characters- I don’t mean Klance or any ship to do with the Paladins (but I wouldn’t complain), but I just want some characters who are openly LGBTQ+ and are strong characters.
* Hunk character development- in season three we got to see Lance and Keith develop deeper, but now it’s my sun’s time to shine. Pretty please.
* Allura badass fighting scene- I want to watch her wreck shit up. Let us see how she fights and how strong she is. That would be awesome.
* Lions development- more insight about the Lions. Do they have anymore abilities? Are they able to form into something other than Voltron?
* Matt/Shiro/Pidge Reunion- DO YOU KNOW HOW HARD I WANT THIS?!?!? I WANT THE TEARS THE HUGS THE EMOTIONS. ALL OF IT!!!!
* Communicate to Earth- surely with all that alien technology, the team would be able to create a way to contact Earth, or at least their families. Imagine the angst!!
* Beach or Rain- for my bby Lance. PLEASE. LET HIM BE HAPPY!!!
* Allura and Coran trying human food- and hardcore judging it.
* Pretty please
* Please
* And thank you

2

secondaries!

gotta dig that plumber/miner/electrician/gardener aesthetics right

Important Quotes from GRRM

“Some people I met thought we have to find the story’s through line. Who’s the important character? Somebody thought that Dany’s the important character – cut away everybody else, tell the story of Dany. Or Jon Snow. Those were the two most popular characters to build everything around, except you’re losing 90 percent of the story. “ - Rollingstone 2014

“[T]hey couldn’t get a handle on the size of the material, the very thing that I set out to do. I had all these meetings saying, “There’s too many characters, it’s too big — Jon Snow is the central character. We’ll eliminate all the other characters and we’ll make it about Jon Snow.” Or “Daenerys is the central character. We’ll eliminate everyone else and make the movie about Daenerys.” And I turned down all those deals.” -Time Magazine 2017

These two quotes are probably the most important quotes from George because he plainly states that the story is not just about Jon/Dæny. George narrows them down to being only 10% of the story. Are they important? Yes. But so are a host of other characters.


“So all that time I thought Gandalf was dead, and now he’s back and now he’s Gandalf the White. And, ehh, he’s more or less the same as always, except he’s more powerful. It always felt a little bit like a cheat to me. And as I got older and considered it more, it also seemed to me that death doesn’t make you more powerful. That’s, in some ways, me talking to Tolkien in the dialogue, saying, “Yeah, if someone comes back from being dead, especially if they suffer a violent, traumatic death, they’re not going to come back as nice as ever.“ That’s what I was trying to do, and am still trying to do, with the Lady Stoneheart character.” - Time Magazine, 2017

Death does not make you stronger or nicer. Applying this to Jon, he is not the same and never will be.


“At some points, when [Game of Thrones showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss] and I had discussions about what way we should go in, I would always favor sticking with the books, while they would favor making changes,” he said. “I think one of the biggest ones would probably be when they made the decision not to bring Catelyn Stark back as Lady Stoneheart. That was probably the first major diversion of the show from the books and, you know, I argued against that, and David and Dan made that decision.” - Time Magazine, 2017

Leaving Lady Stoneheart out was something George feels is a big mistake, we can assume that Lady Stoneheart is integral to the storyline in the unreleased books.


"It was the summer of 1991. I was still involved in Hollywood. My agent was trying to get me meetings to pitch my ideas, but I didn’t have anything to do in May and June. It had been years since I wrote a novel. I had an idea for a science-fiction novel called ”Avalon. I started work on it and it was going pretty good, when suddenly it just came to me, this scene, from what would ultimately be the first chapter of A Game of Thrones. It’s from Bran’s viewpoint; they see a man beheaded and they find some direwolf pups in the snow. It just came to me so strongly and vividly that I knew I had to write it. I sat down to write, and in, like, three days it just came right out of me, almost in the form you’ve read.”- Rollingstone, 2014

The Starks sparked the idea, and are at the very root of the story, but not the entire story. This also emphasizes that this book is not just about a bastard and dragon. +Bran is important, though the show fails to portray this.


“You have to remember that I started writing this story in 1991 and I first met David and Dan in 2007. I was living with these characters and this world for 16 years before we even started working on the show. They’re pretty fixed in my mind and I’m not going to change anything because of the show, or reaction to the show, or what fans think. I’m just still writing the story that I set out to write in the early 1990s.- Time Magazine, 2017

Self-explanatory.


I think there are two types of writers, the architects and the gardeners. The architects plan everything ahead of time, like an architect building a house. They know how many rooms are going to be in the house, what kind of roof they’re going to have, where the wires are going to run, what kind of plumbing there’s going to be. They have the whole thing designed and blueprinted out before they even nail the first board up.”

The gardeners dig a hole, drop in a seed and water it,“ he told the Guardian. "They kind of know what seed it is, they know if [they] planted a fantasy seed or mystery seed or whatever. But as the plant comes up and they water it, they don’t know how many branches it’s going to have, they find out as it grows.-2011, The Guardian

“In the case of any of my novels, I know where I’m starting from, I know where I want to end up, more or less,” he said. “I know some of the big turning points along the way, the stuff I’m building for, but you discover an awful lot along the way. Characters rise up and seem more important, and you get to what you’d thought was going to be a big turning point and… the thing you’d thought about two years ago doesn’t really work as well, so you have a better idea! There’s always that process of discovery for me. I know not all writers work that way, but it’s always been the way I work.” -Time Magazine, 2017

Putting these quotes together because they’re implying similar things. 

George has a view of where he’s going but that doesn’t mean things can’t be reimagined. For an example, George’s original outline is almost completely different from the books we have now, but a few parts of the outline are still there, but taking shape in different characters.


I did consider in the very early stages not having the dragons in there. I wanted the Targaryen’s symbol to be the dragons, but I did play with the notion that maybe it was like a psionic power, that it was pyrokinesis — that they could conjure up flames with their minds. I went back and forth. My friend and fellow fantasy writer Phyllis Eisenstein actually was the one who convinced me to put the dragons in, and I dedicated the third book to her. And I think it was the right call.” -2017 Meduza


“In some senses, Theon is struggling all the way through to be a hero. They both come out of the same situation: they’re both raised in Winterfell by Eddard Stark, but they’re not part of the real, core family. Theon is a ward, and Jon Snow is a bastard son. So they’re both a little outside, but Jon handles this successfully, and Theon fails to handle this. He is poisoned by his own envy and his sense of not belonging.” -2017 Meduza

This quote brings the Season 7 scene with Jon and Theon to mind. Theon tells Jon that he always made the right decision, while Theon made the wrong decisions (choosing the Greyjoys over the Stark family that raised him). Jon will make the right decision.


“So many readers were reading the books with so much attention that they were throwing up some theories, and while some of those theories were amusing bulls— and creative, some of the theories are right. At least one or two readers had put together the extremely subtle and obscure clues that I’d planted in the books and came to the right solution." -The Telegraph, 2014

Extremely Subtle and obscure hints; George’s bittersweet ending will not be predictable. Only a few people have figured out the ending. If your predicted ending involves ultimate good (humans) vs ultimate evil (others), you already lost.

Don’t Worry About ‘Strong Female Characters.’

In a world where a woman showing her chest is somehow pro-feminist and anti-feminist at the same time, it’s easy to see why any writer would stress over their female characters.

Relax.

Chances are, if you know anything about writing, your fictitious females are fine, even if they are fine. But if you’re still worried, I have two good examples from Disney coming up. (Hint: They’re sisters.)

But first…

The term ‘Strong Female Character’ is ludicrous and makes writing worse.

There’s more scrutiny and expectation placed on female characters than male characters, and at a risk of writing a twenty-paragraph essay about who is to blame for that, let’s just say I think the term ‘strong female character’ is part of the problem. It isn’t just a case of high expectations that are impossible to meet, but also about the stress it puts on the author that halts the creative process.

So again, relax.

Stress aside, it can also lead to this:

“I want to write a strong female character. Someone inspiring. Someone every little girl can look up to. Someone…”

No. Stop right there, Idealist. This is why there are so many more Mary Sues than Gary Stus.

You didn’t even know Gary Stu was a thing, did you?

Let go of the idea of representation. You don’t represent anyone. Your character doesn’t represent anyone. You are you, and they are them. Write people.

What does ‘strong’ even mean?

Mentally strong? Physically strong? It can mean just about anything.

The vagueness of the term hasn’t helped.

A lot of people have taken it to mean – and stop me if you’ve heard this before – a fiery, no-nonsense woman, who don’t need no man.

That was good for the first, what, twelve times? Heck, I take that back. It’s still a good archetype, when done correctly. Sarah Connor and Ellen Ripley are beloved examples of this. Iconic, even. Since then, it’s been turned into a formula by people who don’t understand why those characters are liked to begin with, and repeated to the point of yawn-inducing parody.

A character who makes you yawn is not a strong character.

Remember: In writing terms, strong = well-written.

So what makes a well written character?

Let’s look at that example now.

Disney… Sisters… Eldest sings a famous song…

I’m sure you already know. It is of course…

Lilo and Nani.

…What? Who else did you think it was going to be?

Lilo and Nani are, hands-down, two of the best characters Disney has ever put out. They have interests, hobbies, and jobs. They love each other, make each other laugh, but also get on each other’s nerves. They have good qualities and they have bad qualities - and not bad as in Elsa’s 'oh, I’m so insecure’ or Mulan’s 'gosh, I’m so clumsy.’ They are flawed. Nani is short-tempered and irresponsible. Lilo is stubborn and violent. Yet, they’re still likeable because their situation makes it clear why they are the way they are. We can relate to them.

In short: They feel like real people.

And possibly the most important thing for any character: They drive the plot forward.

“Wait, Ashlee!” those of you who have seen the movie cry out, “What about Stitch? He’s the main character. He’s the one who drives the plot forward, surely.”

Stitch is the catalyst. The point of attack. The first plot point. The inciting incident. etc. At the start, its Stitch’s escape from the prison ship and crash landing on Hawaii that causes the plot. After that, it’s largely Lilo and Nani who control the story and the tension.

Speaking of tension…

Good characters have stakes. Raw bloody stakes!

Lilo and Nani have the most to lose. If Nani doesn’t get a job and Lilo doesn’t train the born-to-be-wild Stitch, they lose their home and each other.

To sum it up…

Character Checklist:

  • Vulnerable
  • Flawed 
  • Relatable 
  • High stakes and the ability to overcome them

Thank you for reading. Comments, criticisms, and trolls are welcome.

RT if you care about Barry Allen enough to want him happy, and with the person he loves the most in the world, Iris West. 

What do you think about my portrayal?

👎 - it’s not good

👇 - not that bad, but definitelly could use some improvement

👌 - it’s ok, but there’s some space to improve

✋ - your character’s personality is too bland

🤞- your character’s appearance is too simple (not unique/they have very common traits)

✍ - I’d love to know more about your muse’s backstory

✌ - your character has engaging personality

🤘 - your character has unique, interesting appearance

👊 - I like the way you portray your muse

👍- your portrayal is great

👏 - others should learn from you

🤙 - can you teach me how to portray my muse that well?

The Best Sonic??

Hey, Nanite here. I’m a long-time Sonic the Hedgehog fan and am currently a mod on the @sonicpositive and @motivationalsonic blogs! Cutting to the chase, I’ve been asked by several people who my favorite ‘version’ of Sonic the Hedgehog is, since the franchise has so many different continuities to choose from. I couldn’t decide, so I’m gonna draw some Sonics (not all of them, we’d be here all day) and rate them! Starting we have:

Classic Sonic! What a guy who’s fly, a blue dude with a ‘tude– it’s the original Sonic! How could I not love him? Good and wholesome. Saves little animals. 12/10.

Archie Sonic! Boy does this guy bring back some of my best memories. Me showing off the latest issue to all the other kids in class, reading them out loud to my little brothers and trying my best to get their voices juusttt right. Tons of fun and action and some of the best characters in the whole franchise! Sad to see him go, but I have no doubt IDW Sonic will be just as way past cool! 100/10!

Modern Sonic! Fun games, great music, and a rockin’ look! This guy is all about fun and being a hero and he inspires me every day. Keep on running, Sonic. 10/10.

SatAM Sonic!! I remember being a kid, finishing an episode, and going into the woods behind my house so I could pretend to be a Freedom Fighter and protect the forest from Doctor Robotnik. Tried to dig a hole beneath an old stump so that I could retreat to my own “Knothole Village”. Didn’t get far, but boy was it fun. 15/10.

Dreamcast Sonic! (Adventure Sonic)! Boy oh boy, this guy was the BOMB! Sonic Adventure and Sonic Adventure 2 STILL are two of my favorite games. From the Chao Gardens, to the fun stages, to the absolutely unforgettable music, I think Sonic made a pretty decent transition into 3D. Open Your Heart, dudes. 11/10.

Boom Sonic. Is this the one everyone was waiting for? I sure hope so. I had lots of fun playing Sonic Boom. Yeah, it was glitchy, yeah, it was tough, but there was something incredibly charming about it. I don’t know if it was the character interactions, or the humor, or maybe it was the fact that I had someone else to play it with and it’s more enjoyable with a friend. Say what you want but I liked the game and I love the show. Boom Sonic is funny, relatable, and as always, cool. 10/10.

And last but certainly not least, Werehog Sonic. I love him with all my heart and can’t get enough of this hoggo. He’s not as fast as any of the other Sonics on this list, but his heart is just as big, if not bigger. He only looks scary!! He’s actually a big softie who loves his friends, just like any Sonic should. Sit, Stay, Roll into a ball. This Sonic is a Good Boy. 10000/10.

Annnnnnd there you have it! All the Sonics are good to me and they all have a special place in my heart. “But Nanite, what about Metal, Underground, Aosth, and Riders? What abou–” Hold up!! I intend to rate most of the Sonics I can think of, but I’ll be saving those guys for next time. Though something tells me we’ll come to a similar conclusion haha. Anyway, hope y’all liked the many Sonics! If you actually read to the end of this the surprise is that they’re all transparent and free to use!! Sonic gets a lot of flack, but hopefully this helps spread some positivity! Love ya, Sonic!! <3

anonymous asked:

Honestly I'm just happy you started drawing more Rick Riordan/PJO stuff again. Haven't people learned from before??? Remember when Viria was so done with the PJO fandom after they kept pestering her with 'Why aren't you drawing more PJO?' 'Can you draw some PJO pls' Like Y'all need to be patient and stop asking the artist 'What about this character???' 'When are you doing this one??" Like please stop?? I feel annoyed and I'm not even Viria

ahah, oh god.

I can’t say I’ve reached that level of..uh..well. But it does feel kind of disheartening to constantly have people saying stuff like “where the fuck is this character”, “okay its great but where’s that character” “BUT WHAT ABOUT X CHARACTER”, like. yeah. I know you want to see them, *I* want to see them, but I have only one hand and very limited time. 

Also things like “WHY DO THEY LOOK LIKE IT ITS NOT HOW I IMAGINED THEM” and “NO ITS NOT HOW THEY LOOK”, “WHY ARE THEY DRESSED LIKE THAT” etc etc…It’s completely normal to see characters differently, please remember I can’t get inside someone’s head! I try my best to follow the description and do it justice.

As for PJO, to be honest I think this job actually helped me to restore my love and tenderness I felt for the series, so. Hope it will last:”) So far I feel more joy than anything else.

Thank you for being considerate! *3*~