a character that you want to know more about

anonymous asked:

(1/2) Hello :) I’m writing to you because I seriously need some help with my story (English is not my native language but I will try my best to be understandable). You see, I created my main character (who is on my mind for a really long time) and I wanted to build a fantasy plot based on her, even if I know the contrary is a more logical way. She is an empath so she can interpret, replicate and manipulate the emotions or moods of others. Or rather the opposite: she can block them.

Ah yes, the beloved OC who needs a plot. I know this dilemma well. No worries, there are a few simple questions that will help you get started.

If you want to write about her past:

  • Where did she come from?
  • Where is she now?
  • How did she get here?

If you want to write about her future:

  • Where does she need to go?
  • What needs to happen to get her there?
  • Will she need help getting there?

And if that future is hard to get to:

  • What will get in her way?
  • How will she overcome what gets in her way?
  • Will she make it to her destination, or will she change paths?
  • Where must she end up?

You might also check out some writing prompts or start following some prompt blogs. Roleplay writers often use these to write quick scenarios including their OC. I enjoy them for that reason too. If I find one that interests me, I put my character in the scene and write how he/she would react in that situation. If I fill in the blanks around that scene, I have a story.

As usual, here are some articles that go into more detail than I do (all from Mythcreants because they were first in my bookmarks).  I wish you and your MC the best!

How to Turn Your Concept Into a Story

Using the Heroine’s Journey

Planning Character Arcs 

The Six Traits of Strong Characters

Establishing and Satisfying Plot Threads

Understanding Conflict & Tension 

Outline a Short Story in Seven Steps  (even if you plan something longer)

Dark Wings Digest Panel At Aseliacon!

This year at Aseliacon @based-on-fiction and I will be hosting a panel for Dark Wings Digest! We’ll talk a lot about the process behind making each issue (design, art, writing, themes, etc ), as well as the ideas and choices we make about the characters. But more than anything we’re hoping to talk with readers and get feedback! Everyone at Aseliacon is our target audience and we want to know what you think! If you have any ideas for future issues, general suggestions, if you want to know why we had a certain character do something, if we haven’t used your favorite character yet or very little from your favorite game. We want to know all about it! 

So if you want to let us know what you think or are just interested in the process behind making a magazine please come by our panel on Saturday evening right after artist alley! (Don’t worry, we will remind everyone that stops by our table about it)

And we’ll have plenty of all 5 issues available! 

True Colours: Ghost Story Deleted Scene

Asked by @elvesandturians : I was wondering though, does the main character still look like Camila or has she reverted back to her natural self?

A/N: This takes place somewhere between Part 3 and Part 4. It’s not a true deleted scene. I suppose it’s more of a drabble to add to the story. This was really fun to write tho, so if there are any other bits you have questions on, backstories you want to know about, etc. send an ask and I’ll try to write a little drabble on it.

Ghost Story Masterlist


You heard two knocks on the door and looked up from your book as Clint popped his head into the room.

“Hey kiddo, I brought you some lunch.”

You took the bag and peeked in, quickly closing it again with a squeak.

“Clint you didn’t!”

He beamed at you. “Why don’t you actually open the bag and see for yourself?”

You took the sandwich out of the wrapper and eyed it carefully before taking a large bite.

“Mmmm pefdo wi a hnt of aioli.” You groaned, giving Clint a thumbs up.

“I thought you’d like that flavour combination,” he chuckled, passing you a water bottle. “So, how are you feeling?”

You finished your bite and took a sip of water while you thought. “I’m alright,” you nodded. “Itching to leave the med bay, their food sucks, the usual.”

“Nah, you just prefer my sandwiches over their healthy cardboard.”

“That too.” You giggled, looking down at your feet as they swung back and forth off the edge of the hospital bed.

He nudged your arm. “You sure that’s it? Just sucky food and the usual?”

“I’m also feeling a bit blue I guess. I mean physically. I’m blue. It’s just… weird. Being this colour again. But I can’t really look like Camila can I? That’s not fair to Dr. Banner.”

Clint nodded thoughtfully. "Have you tried talking to Tony?”

“No?”

“I mean he does do all the DNA sciencey stuff. He could probably figure something out.”

“Huh. That’s actually not a half bad idea.”

You hopped off the hospital bed and looked up. “FRIDAY, where’s Tony?”

“He’s in Lab 4, dear. Shall I tell him you’re coming?”

“Yes please.”

You turned toward Clint, a smile tugging at your lips. “Let’s go find out what I look like.”


I didn’t know who to tag so I’m just tagging the usual Ghost Story and main taglists below the cut. I hope you enjoyed this little snippet :)

Keep reading

you know what’s really genuinely unsettling? the degree to which men fucking do not want to sympathize with/be interested in women.

male audiences will happily watch a dozen superhero shows, but then something like Agent Carter or Supergirl turn up and they’re panned from the first trailer and have to struggle for ratings. male audiences will watch countless installments of a franchise as long as it’s about men doing man things but the second a character like Rey or Furiosa or god forbid four entire female Ghostbusters steps up and takes a position of prominence it’s “pandering sjw bullshit”.

it’s not pandering. men just aggressively don’t want to have to be invested in a woman’s narrative and it’s really gross.

this is just a tiny little detail but I really love how they made Viktor tell Yuuri his wants and desires during the course of the show because it shows a lot of character (and really displays the utmost care his VA put into Viktor’s voice)

it’s SO CASUAL 

He says this as if it’s the easiest thing in the world, no big deal, almost a throwaway comment, but knowing how Viktor feels about Yuuri it’s OBVIOUS that this carries a lot more meaning than he lets on

it’s a very natural thing to do because you want to guard the depth of your emotions and fear rejection so you present what you actually want in a way that makes it seem not that important to you, to shield yourself from the eventual rejection and embarrassment that might follow in its wake

he does this again in episode 7

he says this WAY TOO CASUALLY, as if it’s just a random solution that popped into his head (and this is also a sign of how Viktor deals with issues through actions as opposed to words), but once again he just reveals his emotions in a way that puts him out of harm’s way if he’s rejected. VIKTOR’S LIKE “Yuuri you’re crying??? Ah okay I can kiss it better if you want no big deal just doing my job as coach hahaah right Yuuri” 

like

Viktor

your gay is showing

and the fact that he actually kisses Yuuri in the end of the episode just shows that he was entirely serious the whole time on a much deeper level than he lets on (it makes me both laugh and cry that he probably waited for this moment for MONTHS……the poor man, he’s so patient)

episode 9, same thing again

presented in a very lighthearted tone this time. During the first times he talks as if it’s of little importance to him, but now his words are more sincere but with this tone instead. Once again, no grand words, no outpouring emotions, just Viktor casually expressing the depth of what he feels for Yuuri and how he desires for their relationship to progress. At this point he has his boyfriend and he has his kisses, so now he just moves on to the next stage because well, Viktor Nikiforov is madly in love with Yuuri and wants the whole world to know 

HE DOES THIS SO MANY TIMES

I’m just……so in love with the thought of Viktor, while brave enough to express his wishes, still not being able to do this in a way that would perhaps put him in an awkward spot. He’s obviously very pushy right at the beginning and as we know he cries himself to sleep in episode 2 after Yuuri rejects him 

He always appears very confident and overall sure of himself so these things are so interesting to me because, while subtle, it reveals his insecurities and how much he longs for Yuuri but fears being turned down at the same time. Viktor is, until Yuuri comes into his life, ultimately a very lonely character and it makes sense that he would grasp for Yuuri and at the same time feel uncomfortable revealing just HOW MUCH he wants these things.

These subtle choices in dialogue and expressions and voice acting reveals so much to us and I love this kind of storytelling. 

VIKTOR IS SUCH A FASCINATING CHARACTER!! I love him I’m so glad he found love and happiness and a future for himself with Yuuri by his side 

I will forever want justice for every female character who was demonized by fandom because their canon ties to a male character was deemed a threat to a popular slash pairing. 

The 10 Elements of a MAIN CHARACTER

To all the writers who have ever been told “Your characters have to be three dimensional!” or “They should be well-rounded!” and just felt like saying: “What does that even MEAN?! What goes into a 3-dimensional character? Specifically? And how do you go about creating one?!”

Good news. There’s a way. 

Great main characters – heroes, protagonists, deuteragonist, whatever you want to call them – have ten things in common. Ten things that are easily developed, once you know what to create within your character. So no one will ever be able to tell you “needs to be more three dimensional!” ever again. Ha. 

1) Weaknesses: Main characters should be flawed, but I’m not saying this because it will make them more realistic (though it will) – I’m saying they need to be flawed because if they’re not, they shouldn’t be a main character. Story is another word for change, or more accurately, character growth. Not character as in “fictional person”, character meaning “heart and soul”. Story is someone’s character changing, for better or worse. Main characters at the beginning of the story are lacking something vital, some knowledge of themselves, some knowledge of how to live a better life, and this void is ruining their lives. They must overcome these weaknesses, if they’re going to become complete, and reach a happy ending. There are two types of weaknesses: Psychological and Moral. Psychological ones only hurt the main character. Moral ones cause the main character to hurt other people. Easy.  

2) Goal: Characters exist because they want something. Desiring something, and the fight against opposition for that desire, is the lifeblood of story; and because character is story, it’s also desire that can breathe life into words on a page, and begin the process of creating a real person in a reader’s mind. It’s this ‘desire for something’ that sparks that first connection between reader and character. It makes us think “Well, now I have to find out if this person gets what they want.” This is a powerful link. (How many mediocre movies do we suffer through, when we could easily stop watching, because we’re still trapped by that question of “what happens?”) So if this is powerful enough to keep people watching an annoying movie, imagine how powerful it can be in an excellent story. 

Like in Up, the goal is to get the house to Paradise Falls.

3) Want: If the main character wants something, they want it for a darn good reason. Usually, they think that attaining the goal will fill the void they can sense in their lives, the deficiency they can feel, but don’t know how to fix. And they’re almost always wrong. Getting the goal doesn’t help anything; which is why, while pursuing that goal, they discover a deeper need that will heal them. Which brings us to …

4) Need/Elixir: Main characters are missing something, a weakness in their innermost selves is causing them to live a less-than-wonderful life. Through story, these main characters can be healed. Once they discover what’s missing, and accept it, and change the way they live to include this truth they’ve uncovered … they’re healed. Learning this truth, whatever it is, forms the purpose of the story for the main character. The reader, and the character, think the story is about achieving that big tangible goal the premise talks about; really, underneath it all, the story is about someone achieving a big intangible truth, that will ultimately save their life and future. Often, this need is exactly what the character fears or professes to hate. 

Like Finding Nemo, where Dory states exactly what Marlin needs to learn. 

5) Ghosts: 

Not this kind of ghosts.

Ghosts are events in your character’s past which mark the source of their weaknesses and strengths. Because these happened, the character became who they are. All we need to know about backstory are these moments, because who the character became is all we care about. There’s really only one ghost you absolutely need: the source of their moral and psychological weakness. Something happened that knocked the character’s world off kilter, and everything from that moment onward has been tainted by what happened. This moment haunts them (hence the name), and holds them back from uncovering that need that will heal their weaknesses. Pixar are masters of this: the source of Carl being stuck in the past, curmudgeonly, unable of loving anyone new? Ellie dying; his ghost. In Finding Nemo, the source of Marlin being suffocating, protective to the point of being harmful, possessive, and fearful? His wife and 99% of his children being eaten in front of him; his ghost. 

6) True Character: These are the strengths, values, convictions, fears, faults, beliefs, worldview, and outlook on life that make the main character who they truly are. 

7) Characterization: This is everything on the surface of a main character. The way they look, talk, act, etc. All of this originates from those deeper elements of their being, the strengths, values, ghosts, weaknesses, needs, that make them who they truly are. So often, you can think of this as a facade they’re projecting, a way to shield the the truth about themselves, how they wish to be perceived. The story, and the other characters, are slowly going to see deeper than this characterization, revealing more and more of the reasons it is the way it is. 

8) Arc: If the character is going to change from “Incomplete Person” to “Complete Person” there’s going to be a journey they go on to make that possible. The external story, the pursuit of that big tangible goal the premise is about, is causing an inner journey to take place. What they have to do in pursuit of that external goal will apply pressure to those weaknesses, and pressure causes change. This process has seven steps, but if I write it all here this post is going to be obscenely long. So I might wait and give this its own post.

9) Changed Person: Who is the character going to be at the end of this story? They better be different, or else the story didn’t work. How do they show how different they’ve become? What is the moral choice they make, that spins their trajectory from “the future doesn’t look so great” to “happily ever after”? This should be known right away, maybe even before anything else is settled about the character. This gives a distinct end goal, a way to work backwards, a destination in mind that you can navigate towards.  

10) Fascination and Illumination: The surface characterization, and the brief glimpses of the true character underneath create curiosity in the reader/audience. What the character says, and the implied subtext beneath the dialogue, creates a puzzle the audience wants to solve. Actions they take work the same way; if the writer indicates there’s deeper motivation behind why a character behaves in the way they do, we buy into solving that mystery right away. We can’t help it. “Who are you really? Why are you the way you are? And how is that going to effect the story?” These are all the unspoken, almost not consciously acknowledged, questions that fascinating characters provoke. Searching out meaning, connecting the dots to find the truth – we can’t resist this. We’re not fascinated by tons of backstory and exposition about a character; we’re fascinated by story, by mystery, by the technique of withholding information and having to interpret and hunt out the truth on our own.  So gradually, the story and the characters will force that character to reveal a little more, and a little more, until we have a complete picture of who this person is. Crucial that this information isn’t told up front. Gradually illuminate it. It’s just like getting to know a real person. 

So how does this work in a real character? Let’s take a look at Flynn Rider/Eugene Fitzherbert, because almost everybody has seen that movie. 

Moral Weaknesses: He’s selfish. He’s a little greedy. He’s a little rude. He uses his charisma and bravado to keep people at a distance from the real him. 

Psychological Weaknesses: Insecurity, fear of vulnerability, feels like the real him (Eugene) would be unwanted, unlovable, and have nothing – just like when he was an orphaned kid. Also, he doesn’t know who he wants to be, what he wants to live for. 

Goal: Flynn wants to get that crown. So he has to get Blondie to see the floating lights, so she’ll give it back to him, and then they can part ways as unlikely friends.  

Want: Why does he want the crown? What does it mean for him? He actually states it (reluctantly) in song: “I have dreams like you, no really. Just much less touchy feely. They mainly happen somewhere warm and sunny. On an island that I own, tanned and rested and alone. Surrounded by enormous piles of money.” He senses there’s something off in his life, something is missing. But he mistakenly believes this missing piece is money, which will allow him to buy a lonely island, where he can live out his days as Flynn and no one will ever know Eugene. 

Need: “All those days chasing down a daydream. All those years living in a blur. All that time never truly seeing, things the way they were. Now she’s here, shining in the starlight. Now she’s here, suddenly I know. If she’s here, it’s crystal clear, I’m where I’m meant to go.” He wants a crown … he needs to fall in love with Rapunzel. He needs to love something more than himself, and find out that love isn’t something to fear and push away. He needs to abandon the 'Tales of Flynnagin Rider’ ambition, and get a more worthwhile, new dream. 

Ghost: The source of all of his weaknesses can be linked to his “little bit of a downer” childhood as an orphan. Interestingly, he isn’t aware of another facet of that ghost, and Rapunzel points it out to him. “Was he a thief too?” she asks. He looks taken aback, before answering “Uh, no.” Something’s gone wrong. The choices he’s making are not living up to that original role model.  

Characterization: Flynn’s charming, funny, smart, charismatic, and arrogant (in a somehow charming sort of way). He’s also rude, contemptuous, and sarcastic. All traits that help him keep up that 'swashbuckling rogue’ facade, and push people away from the real him. 

True Character: Underneath all that, he’s a Disney prince. That pretty much sums it up.  

Changed Person: “Started going by Eugene again, stopped thieving, and basically turned it all around.” He started the story as the guarded and evasive Flynn, he ends as the selfless and thoroughly-in-love Eugene. 

Fascination and Illumination: Imagine if everything about Flynn had been told, right up front. We know he’s an orphan, we know he’s upheld a fake reputation, we know he’s a kind and loving guy underneath it all, we even know about his “tales of Flynnagin” childhood dream. You know what happens? We like him … but we’re not interested in him. There’s nothing we need to find out. There’s no curiosity. And if there’s no curiosity, and nothing being illuminated, your story’s not going anywhere. So instead, we find out – alongside Rapunzel – more about Flynn as the story progresses. And that is how it should be. 

So!

Developing characters in this way, I’ve found, really reduces worries about how “well-rounded” and three dimensional I’ve made them. They feel real to me. And besides helping me create characters, this ten element technique has also let me analyze characters I like, which is strangely fun. It’s a great way to figure out why a character works, what causes them to be so effective, and how you can go about creating them yourself. 

Yeah, I’m a bit of a nerd. 

But if you want, try it out. Develop a character. Analyze a character. You might find it as useful/fun as I do.

“As a black American man you’re taught that you have to be the most imposing, the most physical, that much better than your counterparts—and being homosexual is perceived as the inverse of that. But finding Chiron’s character, for me, had very little to do with [his] sexuality, because I feel like you fall in love with the mental aspect of people, not the physical. If I’d been born loving men, I’d love them the same way I love women. For me, it was really more about learning to hate myself, because Chiron hates himself. I had to allow myself to feel this disdain towards other people because I couldn’t accept myself. I really didn’t know I wanted to be an actor until this role. [Acting] always felt like pretending. But with this character, I felt as far removed from myself as I could be—and I loved this person. I cried for him.”  -  Trevante Rhodes about his role in Moonlight

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And all I was supposed to feel was grateful. I was supposed to just shut up and be thankful that I had these great parents who wanted me when my birth parents didn’t. But the truth is you never wanted me, either. What are you talking about? I was a replacement for your dead baby. That’s all I’ve ever been.  You got it all wrong, son.  No, I’ve spent my life striving for perfection, and you know why, Dad? ‘Cause I live in fear. That if I let up for a moment, I will remember that I am unwanted.

And another thing about this photo reel

The immediate reasons to be fucking oBSESSED are obvious but do you know what else really has me emotional about it? 

Yuuri’s confidence. His carefree attitude. He’s totally taking the lead here! Like seeing this is WILD for me, especially knowing this happened BEFORE THE EVENTS of this series. I love this! I can’t get enough of this and I want more (hence my other post lol). LOOK AT HIM. And just take away the obvious perfection of this victuuri content and think about Yuuri as a character. 

Yes, he’s drunk, but listen drinking doesn’t give you qualities and skills you weren’t already capable of. I’m p sure all of them were a little tipsy :p.  All it does it lower your inhibitions and amplify certain aspects of you that already exist. Drunk Yuuri is still Yuuri. THIS IS REALLY YUURI. He didn’t just suddenly learn how to pole dance and break dance and do all these holds. And we’ve seen him pull of his eros sober. It was something all his own and it was so surprising at the time but now? Now it makes perfect sense in the best way. 

I really feel like the Yuuri in these camera roll scenes is significantly real and seeing him so confident and in the spotlight is like WOW. My heart breaks a little because HE DOESN’T REMEMBER. Boy has to know and understand that he captured everyone’s heart that night. He’s a goddamn shooting star. As a character he’s a triumph, a masterpiece. He’s so multifaceted and honestly seeing his journey to this point in his career was already good enough. 

But they didn’t stop there! They were like “Not only is Yuuri a badass now, he was ALWAYS A BADASS. Victor didn’t change him at all. This wasn’t what we thought it was going to be at first AT ALL. It seemed like Victor was spicing up Yuuri’s life and bringing out all these NEW sides of him. ALL LIES. Yuuri was the one spicing up Vitya’s life. EVERYONE’S lives even! Who knows what the atmosphere between all of them was like before this? Like honestly? I bet they were all being super stuffy and formal and not all that chummy like they are now and their closeness now is partially thanks to this cute boy. I love Yuuri so much like :’) Just….I just need a moment. *ahem* 

OKAY but do y’all UNDERSTAND like he was upstaging CHRISTOPHE !!! 

he was DANCE BATTLING YURIO. YURIO you guys. Since when has this kid been a socialite? Letting loose at parties?! WHAT? This is the power of our pork cutlet king

this was ALL before the main events in the series like…I’m dumbfounded right now.

Yuri was so timid and insecure in the first episode. And we just rolled with that. We thought this was about a blossoming skater trying to find his footing again. We thought it was about Victor helping him learn to be confident. 

Originally posted by bunnydesuuu

But nah. Yuuri had us fucking fooled. This man is a showstopper. This guy captivated the greatest skater on the scene, he completely stole the show. He just hit a rough spot, honestly.  

Imagine if someone tried to tell us Yuuri Katsuki knew how to do pole! Or breakdance! Or would hold his idol Victor in a saucy tango pose? 

We’d all be like HA! Okay~ :p 

We thought Victor was going to be the seductive one. 

Mann the production team must have been laughing at all of us this whole time. They were sitting on this from DAY ONE. 

We got played in the best way. Honestly? Standing ovation. This is how it’s done. Other studios better step up because YOI raised the bar beyond our wildest dreams. 

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i drew this like two months ago and i post it on my twitter but i didn’t wanted to post it here yet because i wanted to design hunk!,sadly my tablet broke so i don’t think i’ll doing it for the moment.
this are the design for my vampire hunters au! (is a klance au).

if you want to know more about this au, i wrote here  and here a little of the role of each character.

also i drew some klance nsfw-ish about this

you received an invitation to a dinner party hosted by one of your more popular mutuals. you want to get to know them better, so you go.

sandwiched between 2 of your mutuals-in-law, you pick off the pineapple from your pizza. you start to think that coming to this party was a bad idea. that fact solidifies itself when your eyes meet with someone across the table: its an ex mutual. you softblocked them a week ago because they were talking shit about your top comfort character. you hope that they still havent noticed that you softblocked them, but their eyes are drilling holes in you. a cold sweat drips down your neck.

one of the mutuals-in-law tries to start a conversation: “so i started watching that new anime… i think im kin with the blue haired one,” they say. the other mutual-in-law turns to look at you. “me too,” they say. the mutual you softblocked says from across the table, “me too”. you stare down at the pile of pineapple on your plate. “m-me too,” you choke out.

coming to this party was a terrible idea

“Everyone who works on this show loves Alex Danvers and wants good things for her and Maggie, so we decided to go for it.”

- Andrew Kreisberg [x]

This. 

This right here is why Supergirl feels like a fresh of breath air in a swamp full of brutally killed beloved characters and constant unearned angst.

They love their characters, and they act like it.

Any writer knows that your favorite characters sometimes have the worst things happen to them, as a result of more attention being paid to them and a storytelling need for obstacles and emotionality in order for the narrative to keep going on. Your favorite character’s psyche is the one you want to explore the most, and you do that by testing their limits and seeing how they respond to obstacles. In general, there needs to be a lot of conflict for the story to stay dramatic and interesting.

However, what many storytellers are forgetting about is ever having any resolutions.

“Conflict, conflict, resolution, conflict” is the method I prefer as a writer. There must always be more conflicts than resolutions, but if you leave out resolutions all together it leaves your characters suicidal and your consumers dread-filled. 

Most shows right now look like “conflict, conflict, conflict, conflict.”

When this style first started happening, viewers latched on. It was new and edgy and exciting because you just had to know what happens next. But viewers are catching on.

What will happen next is simply the worst thing that can happen without destroying the show.

And this formula has made prejudice terribly obvious. When you destroy everything that surrounds your favorite character for the purpose of affecting them psychologically, you reveal who matters to you. You reveal who matters to your story.

And who doesn’t. 

Straight characters matter. White characters matter. Male characters matter. Cis, able bodied, and neurotypical characters, all only going outside the norm enough to be quirky versions of the same thing, matter.

So everyone else is screwed. And the writers don’t even seem to realize that this is what’s happening.

“No one is safe” is a lie. 

No writer kills off the characters that the story is really about.


And then there is Supergirl.

A show that is positive whenever it can be, and in a way that doesn’t sacrifice the real grief at the center of it, but rather creates goodness on behalf of it.

Do you think that other television show writers would have been able to resist killing off Jimmy Olsen when they decided against a Kara x James endgame? Think of the emotional damage it would have done to Kara, the shock of the fans, the headlines: 

“Supergirl Kills Beloved Comic Book Character Jimmy Olsen”

But they didn’t kill him or write him off. They put pen to paper and came up with a new storyline because he is one of the show’s core characters. He matters.

J’onn matters.

He serves as Space Dad to Kara and Alex and helps them out with their storylines, but he also has his own storylines that are driven by his own agency. Most notably, a storyline with a woman of color. Two poc filling the screen in scenes that are about them and only about them.

Alex matters.

It’s no secret that the Danvers sisters are the heart of the show. But what I think the writers realized last season was that Alex’s storylines were too focused on Kara. They wanted to give her her own agency (her own apartment), because, as they said, they love Alex.

And the craziest thing about this is that they showed that Alex matters by making her gay. (What kind of opposite world is this? Important gay characters? A female president? Pretty much everything that we don’t have right now?)

This wasn’t “We need to meet our representation quota, bring one in.” 

This was “Hmmm, how do we make this character we love more important in the story? Alright, get the Gay Gun™, let’s Lesbify this shit.”

I can’t believe I just used ‘gay’ and ‘gun’ together in a positive context

And then, my god, she gets the girl.

It’s not handed to her, but the conflicts are purposefully reflections of real conflicts, rather than convoluted plot points. But- and this is the important part- they have happy endings

Alex’s coming out process is a little awkward and messy, and then she couldn’t be with the girl because of real issues that real lesbians understand. But then then Maggie says ‘screw it, I want to be happy’.

That’s what all of these characters constantly strive for. That’s why the center of the show, Kara, is so bright despite her grief. She chooses to see the best in people, she chooses to fix the problems she encounters. She chooses to be happy. They all do.

And this isn’t happening on some light comedy show that doesn’t need drama. Supergirl is plenty dramatic. Anyone who has had to watch Melissa Benoist and Chyler Leigh cry on their tv knows how it feels to break your heart over this show.

And they aren’t dealing with easy topics. Incomprehensible grief and racism and heteronormativity and genocide are just some of the topics Supergirl touches on. And they don’t always hit the topics exactly right.

But underneath it all is the message that people are good, everyone matters, and goddammit, good things will happen.

I just feel like… they care. Like Leslie Knope level caring. Like ‘little kids are watching this and we’re going to use this to send them important messages in a positive way while staying true to the characters we’ve written.’

I’m not saying this is exceptional, really. I’m not saying that everything else is like okay but this is wonderful. I’m saying that everything else is terrible and that this is simply… positive. That somehow, because of this mess, it has become comparatively a beacon of hope.

I’m saying that this is what the norm should be. 

I’m telling writers out there to take note, because this isn’t something only Supergirl is capable of.

2

So ANIMATE’s newest Cafe Collab started yesterday in Japan, and it is suits+flowers themed. Some of the characters look very wedding-esque including Victor and Yuuri. We couldn’t tell from the original thumbnails released, but now that we have closeups of the items from people who have been, we can tell Victor and Yuuri do indeed have their rings on in these acrylic stands/badges! So uh yeah, this is definitely wedding themed for them.

I know we’ve really been wanting more official stuff with rings, so this is exciting. Plus these are cute as heck. It almost looks like they have hearts in their eyes! You can see more about the Cafe collab here (including images of the rest of the characters featured).

Thanks to soukatsu  on twitter for the info! 

anonymous asked:

Dear Duke, I have noticed something about my writing: I do not know how to conduct a dialogue. I do not know how to add an emotional "burden" to the discussion. It does not sound believable what I write. To me, it seems more like a lecture than a simple conversation. I just wanted to write engaging more with the emotional side of my characters than with the intellectual. How can I do it?

Hi! You’re in the right place because dialogue is actually my favorite thing to write and any book of mine you pick up will probably be like at least 40% people talking. Idk if this is because I did so much theatre or because I just can’t shut up, but it’s high time I did a real post about it, so:

Advice for Aspiring Authors: On Dialogue

  1. You need it so don’t resist it. Books that are just huge chunks of prose are exhausting, and if you never use dialogue you’re either (1) summarizing or (2) writing a really boring book, and either way the the result is the same. Your reader is going to be bored. Choosing the right scenic mode is important and sooner or later people are going to have to speak in the moment. 
  2. Don’t stress about speaker tags. Putting this at the top because a lot of new writers seem to get hung up on it. But I’ve already addressed this, so read this post here. Pro-tip? If you’re writing a conversation between two people or even three, you often don’t need speaker tags at all. I recently wrote a conversation that takes place over the phone which consists of about 25 lines exchanged and didn’t use a single speaker tag because it was, in all instances, obvious who was doing the talking. Later in the same MS I have a really chaotic hospital scene where like twelve people are yelling at the same time and interrupting each other and there are no speaker tags because idgaf if anybody knows who’s saying what. It should feel like chaos. (If you want a really great example of this, pick up a copy of William Faulkner’s Sanctuary and read the funeral scene.) Readers are smart. They’ll figure it out.
  3. Different people speak in different ways. Who a character is will often determine how they speak. For instance, Theodore von Wammelspout, Crown Prince of Prosenstatz, is probably going to have a very different dialect than Paw Paw O’Halloran, Louisiana shrimp fisherman. (If you want a better example of what I’m talking about, watch the movie Kingsman and pay attention to how and when Eggsy switches dialects, or read the prologue to The Taming of the Shrew and pay attention to the immediate tonal shift in Christopher Sly’s dialogue when he wakes up from a drunken stupor thinking he’s a lord.) Think about a character’s origins and upbringing and backstory when deciding how they talk.
  4. But stay away from writing dialect unless you really know what you’re doing. Don’t try to phonetically write a character’s accent or dialect unless you’re a linguist, because a lot of dropped consonants and deliberate misspellings can be really difficult to read, come out like you’re trying too hard, or even end up looking vaguely racist. If a character has an accent, find a way to tell us they have an accent and then spell all their dialogue correctly. There are, of course, exceptions to the rule–i.e, if a phonic misunderstanding is crucial to the story. But basically, unless you’re writing Trainspotting, don’t do this. What’s much better and much more effective is to describe how a character says something or what their voice sounds like. What’s the texture? The color? The temperature? A warm, rough, slow voice belongs to a different character than a cold, high, slick voice does. Or maybe the same character can switch from one to the other. Give your character’s voice the same attention you would give their body or their habits or anything else.
  5. It’s a character speaking, not the narrator. Each character should have their own voice, in the same way that each story will have a slightly different narrator, even if it’s a neutral third person narrator. Writing is all about voice and style, and part of the challenge is that you as the writer have to be a mockingbird and be able to speak in as many different voices as you have characters. It will take practice. It will require a lot of questions asked, such as “Who never says a bad word? Who swears like a sailor? Who talks in a constant, uninterrupted stream and who hardly says a word?” For an exercise, write out a plain uninteresting sentence like, “He was on his way home from the store when he got a flat tire,” the way the narrator would say it, and then rewrite it in every character’s voice. Because one character might say it just like that–”I was on my way home from the store and I got a flat tire”–and another might say, “You’re not going to fucking believe this. Okay, so I’m on my way home from the store, because we’re out of beer again, because Steve was supposed to go get more and he didn’t, the dickhead–and what happens? Well, obviously, because this worthless excuse of a city can’t be bothered to keep the roads clear, I drive right through a patch of broken glass and BANG! Blow a tire. Swear to God, I thought it was a gunshot, I nearly ran my car into a telephone pole.” If all your characters sound alike or sound like the narrator or (worse) sound like you, it’s time to stop and reevaluate. 
  6. Characters don’t speak for you. Look, unless you’re writing a really boring story it’s going to have a bunch of people in it with a bunch of different ideas and some of them should believe things that you don’t agree with or speak in a way you find objectionable. Characters are sometimes going to have to say things you find morally deplorable and they have to say them with conviction. I recently wrote a scene where my FMC’s boyfriend and her dad argue about what they’re going to do about her, like she’s not a grown-ass woman who can take care of herself. And they both say things that are utterly atrocious and that if I heard a man say in real life, I would probably punch him in the face. But that’s important. In fiction, you gotta tell it all and tell it like it is. Fiction isn’t true but it should be honest. Not every character can agree with you or with each other. (This is a big part of the reason that authorial intent is a flawed concept. An author who depicts something isn’t necessarily condoning or endorsing it.) You should be writing about difficult shit and writing about it from every vantage point and using dialogue to do that. You don’t need to agree with angelic equality crusader Nancy and homophobic Uncle Jeff equally but they need to be equally convincing. Write disagreements. Write arguments. Let characters fight and get pissed and tell each other to fuck off. It’s honest, and it’s interesting. Conflict is good.
  7. Incomplete sentences are your best friend. So are run-ons. That scene I mentioned that was 25 lines with no speaker tags? There’s also not a complete sentence in that whole exchange. We rarely speak in full correct sentences, even if we know perfectly well that what we’re saying isn’t grammatically perfect. So something like this: 
            “Seen my keys?”
            “In the basket.”
    Totally acceptable. People are lazy. They talk in fragments. Dialogue doesn’t have to be correct, because it often isn’t. Stick commas and dashes wherever the fuck you want to mimic the pattern of speech. Worry about what’s natural, not what’s correct. Sometimes what goes unsaid is just as interesting as what does get said. For instance, if Joe turns to Carol and starts to say, “Have you ever thought about–” and then never finishes the sentence, that’s going to keep a reader wondering. Has she ever thought about what? In much the same way, you can have a character ramble for an entire paragraph in an epic run-on sentence if that’s the way they talk, or if they’re distressed or upset and trying to get the words out. The last book I finished has a chapter at the end where one character literally talks without interruption for nine pages. And as insane as that sounds it’s actually totally necessary because she’s telling a story that’s important for the readers and the other characters to hear but it’s a hundred times better to hear it in her own voice, grammatical correctness be damned.
  8. Don’t try too hard to be eloquent. How many people do you know in real life who spout off perfectly articulate declarations of their feelings? Probably none. They ramble and stall and repeat themselves. Real-life conversations are not movie conversations. They’re not smooth. They’re not perfectly timed. A character just saying “Fuck me” because they have no idea what else to say is perfectly plausible (and also a great opportunity for comedy). Here’s an exercise if you’re having trouble: Make two columns on a page, and on one side write out what this character is trying to say (i.e, “I love you.” “I’ve been trying to tell you for years.” “But I’m afraid you don’t want me to.”) and on the other write out what they actually say (i.e., “I really hope you’ll stay.” “You know you’re always welcome to stay.” “I don’t want you to feel like you have to stay. Just that you can. If you want to.”) Sometimes the juxtaposition between what we’re trying to say and what actually comes out is so important. So don’t worry about perfect articulation or doing justice to the “emotional burden.” Worry about the intent and the impact and how those two things align–or don’t.
  9. Read it out loud. This is one of the most important things teachers in playwriting workshops will tell you to do. Read it out loud. If it feels awkward or unnatural, it probably is. Thus also to dialogue in prose fiction. Even better option? Get a couple of friends to read it for you. This will work wonders for helping you figure out what feels awkward.
  10. HAVE FUN WITH IT. When I say dialogue is far and away my favorite thing to write, I’m not kidding at all. You can learn so much about a character or how two characters interact by how they talk to each other. Do they tease, do they nag, do they finish each other’s sentences? Do they use slang, do they slur, do they talk about celebrities they’ve never met as if they’ve known them for years and they’re the best of friends? Let their personalities shine through, because when characters speak is the only time they’re not getting filtered through a narrator, even if that narrator is themselves. Dialogue provides some of the most poignant moments of characterization you’ll ever get. So play with it. Try the same line fifty different ways until it feels right. Let your characters speak for themselves.

Good luck! Go forth and write great dialogue and have a blast doing it.

Something that took forever for me to learn with fanfiction dialogue.

it’s okay to make your character stumble over, and to think about their words.

It’s okay to give characters speech patterns and let me tell you why;

It’s natural.

Every single person has a speech pattern. We all speak differently, we speak like our personalities and it’s a good way to get to know a character.

Something I’ve noticed in YA books in the characters speaking without filler words like ‘well’, ‘anyway’, ‘like’, ‘literally’.

And remember: it’s okay to use these! Make your dialogue more realistic, and more human!

Sometimes, people talk slower, and have to think about what they want to say.

Sometimes, people stumble over their words because they’re anxious.

Sometimes, people talk really fast and blur their words together because they’re afraid to forget what they want to say!

Selective people prefer not to talk at all, and like to stay mute for their own safety or comfort, and the best you can do is respect them for choosing it.

It’s okay to use phrases like, ‘yknow’, ‘uh’, ‘uhm’, ‘mhm’ because it’s how we speak in the real world.

It’s okay to have characters hum in thought, or use their body to portray that they’re thinking!

Some people fiddle with something in their hands while thinking!

Some people bite their lips in thought.

Some people hum under their breath while they think.

Silent ways of telling the reader that your character is thinking words that they’re not ready to say yet!!

It’s okay to have your character repeat words and or phrases when excited and when they can’t contain it! Sometimes, we just get so excited, that we aren’t thinking about how many times we say things.

It’s okay to write a character repeating themselves, especially if they want to get their point across to someone/if someone didn’t understand their point in the first place.

Non-verbal replies!!!

Shrugging of the shoulders, incoherent mumbles, hand gestures, use the power of writing to describe a reply or phrase with facial expressions, or physical movement!! Silence is okay too, if it’s needed!

Silence can speak just as much as words!

Dialogue is important.

Dialogue that flows and is human is i m p o r t a n t!!

I don’t want to take any credit if it’s [perceived as] something that is like a contribution. That’s the nature of being an artist. You express your takes on your character. So in the beginning when I was discussing about my character with Gareth [Edwards, director] and I just felt it would be so much cooler to make him less of a cliché character – like, warrior monk, you know? How serious is that, right? How about give him a little bit of vulnerability. How about being blind? And, a little bit sense of humor? That was always my persistence of keeping him grounded, having that sense of humor so the audience can relate to him a lot more. So, I suggested it and he’s cool with it and Disney loved it and here we are.
— 

Donnie Yen about why he proposed to make his character blind.

A quick reminder...

Don’t be afraid to say hello to someone you want to roleplay with.

The whole point of being in the roleplay community is to get to know each other and help one another develop characters and have fun! 

  • Send an ask
  • Respond to a meme
  • IM the blog
  • Say hello

Just let the person know you’re interested in interacting! 

I know we all get nervous about rejection, or think we’re being imposing or annoying, but no one would know others are interested in roleplaying with them unless we say something

And remember: if they aren’t interested, there’s plenty of other blogs itching to meet people, and if they’re rude in response to your request, then you shouldn’t associate with them anyway. 

It makes someone feel good when they find out a person wants to interact.

So get out there and make some friends! We’re all in this together!

Something about Thace

MAJOR SPOILER UP AHEAD

Honestly is anyone going to talk about Thace here? He legitimately died for the sake of defeating the galra, and you know what? He didn’t have enough time on the show, and I really want to know more about him, even if he is dead now. 

He was a sacrificing character, and honestly he kept me on the edge of my seat, from where Prorok was taken and changed into a robeast, to when he was captured himself. He would not give the Galras coordinates to the secret bases of the rebels, and he literally smiled about how much success he overcame when he died. He knew Voltron was going to win. Without this galra right here, Voltron wouldn’t even be able to get to Zarkon.

This man needs the praise he deserves.