a genetics

Simblreen Gift #5 - Natural Eyes Non Default

First of all, I know that it says 12 colors and there are pictured only 11. The reason is that I’m still the smartest person in the world and forgot to take one of them and I realised it when I was editing the picture. The missing color is a darker brown.

Enabled for all ages, I think. At least child to elder. They are non default like it’s said in the title and they are in eyes section, not in makeup or similar (I say, they are not contact lenses)

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(From a Q&A with Pablo Hidalgo, 2003)
“[Leia] has a real image of her father.  It’s Bail Organa.”

I really loved this answer for something I hadn’t thought too much of.  It’s fairly common to have Leia not thinking of Anakin Skywalker as her father, but it’s something that I appreciate being laid out here all the same–that biology is not the be-all-end-all of family relationships and that it’s about what the character themselves want.

Luke always wanted a father, he daydreamed about it all his life.  Leia, on the other hand, was satisfied with her life, and so her real family is the one she lost on Alderaan.  But, to be fair, Luke was also on an incredibly boring planet, while Leia lived a much more exciting life, he had much more to yearn for than she did, he felt a pull to the stars in a way that she was already living out.

They were both raised with two loving adults who weren’t their biological parents, but it depended on what the person at the center themselves wanted and how they felt about it, not about this idea that sharing genetic material with someone should always be triumphant over the people who cared for you, who were there day in and day out, who taught you, who played with you, who tucked you into bed, who answered your questions when you had them, who loved you.

It’s one of my favorite things about Star Wars, that whether it’s Leia with the Organas or the adoptions of the Jedi or the found family of the Phoenix crew, that family doesn’t have to be just genetics.  Family are the people who care for you and are there for those important moments in your life and are the ones that influence you.  Family can be about blood, but it doesn’t have to be, and those families don’t have to be traditional structures (though, those are good, too!) to be real.

npr.org
Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene
In experimental embryos, scientists were able to repair the gene that causes a serious heart disorder. But more research is needed to confirm the method would produce healthy babies, they say.

An international team of scientists reports they have successfully figured out a way to edit DNA in human embryos — without introducing the harmful mutations that were a problem in previous attempts elsewhere. The work was published online Wednesday in the journal Nature.

What if….? 

Based on this ask I got yesterday - what if Sandstorm & Dustpelt became mates? Like I said i don’t think their relationship would last very long, as Sandstorm would be too bossy and dominant over Dustpelt and she wouldn’t be satisfied with him as a mate. The two break up before their kits become apprentices, and Dustpelt eventually becomes mates with Ferncloud, with Sandstorm going on to become deputy. 

Shrewkit, Leafkit, Squirrelkit, Spiderkit 

3

Japanese scientists have genetically engineered a chrysanthemum flower that is “true blue” — a color that has long eluded flower breeders and researchers.

Blue has proved a challenge to produce in many other popular flowers, including roses, carnations and lilies.

It hasn’t happened until now in chrysanthemums due to the “recalcitrant and unpredictable expression of introduced genes,” Naonobu Noda from Japan’s National Agriculture and Food Research Organization tells The Two-Way. Noda is the lead author of the paper released today in Science Advances.

When scientists tried previously to introduce genes to create a blue color, Noda said, the flower would “shut them off by as yet unknown mechanisms.” Other attempts produced violet flowers, not blue ones.

PHOTOS: Japanese Scientists Turn Chrysanthemums ‘True Blue’

Photo: Naonobu Noda and Satoshi Yoshioka/NARO

nytimes.com
In a First, Gene Therapy Halts a Fatal Brain Disease
With a disabled AIDS virus, doctors supply a gene to boys with a degenerative neural condition.
By Gina Kolata

For the first time, doctors have used gene therapy to stave off a fatal degenerative brain disease, an achievement that some experts had thought impossible.

The key to making the therapy work? One of the medicine’s greatest villains: HIV.

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