a character reveal

Robron: The Reveal

It broke Robert’s heart when Aaron said that Gordon had already taken so much from him. He wasn’t going to let him take Robert away too.

He didn’t want Aaron to feel like he had to forgive him because of that.

He took responsibility for his actions. He told Aaron he was the one who screwed up. He told Aaron he was willing to deal with the consequences.

He refused to let Aaron take blame. He refused to let Aaron feel like he had to stick around, for any other reason, than because he absolutely wanted to.

It’s the most selfless thing I’ve ever seen Robert Sugden do. He might have a lot of faults. But this is how he truly loves Aaron Dingle.

And we only got to see it? Because Maxine Alderton wrote the episode.

teenvogue.com
Cole Sprouse Says Keeping Jughead Asexual Is “Severely Important”
The actor is advocating for the representation on ‘Riverdale.'
By De Elizabeth

Cole Sprouse plays Jughead Jones in the CW’s upcoming Riverdale, a new show reimagining the Archie comic series. Based on the character’s repeated, emphasized disinterest in girls, Jughead has been the focal point of much speculation regarding his sexuality over the course of the comics’ eight decades of publication. As recently as last year, the characters was revealed to be canonically asexual.

With the aging comics’ relevance revitalized via the CW’s Riverdale, many fans are wondering just how much the underrepresented sexuality (or rather, absence of) would be specifically emphasized. And there’s no greater advocate than the character’s actor himself.

“I hope that huge corporations like the CW recognize that this kind of representation is rare and severely important to people who resonate with it,” Sprouse tells Teen Vogue, “That demands representation. It would be a wonderful thing if that were the case.

Sprouse does reveal that the first season of Riverdale will not directly touch on asexuality; however, he does call the show an origin story, where the characters will learn, grow, and discover who they are. In the meantime, Sprouse says he will “keep fighting for this pretty heavily.”

Riverdale airs Thursdays at 9 on the CW.

The 10 Elements of a MAIN CHARACTER

To all the writers who have ever been told “Your characters have to be three dimensional!” or “They should be well-rounded!” and just felt like saying: “What does that even MEAN?! What goes into a 3-dimensional character? Specifically? And how do you go about creating one?!”

Good news. There’s a way. 

Great main characters – heroes, protagonists, deuteragonist, whatever you want to call them – have ten things in common. Ten things that are easily developed, once you know what to create within your character. So no one will ever be able to tell you “needs to be more three dimensional!” ever again. Ha. 

1) Weaknesses: Main characters should be flawed, but I’m not saying this because it will make them more realistic (though it will) – I’m saying they need to be flawed because if they’re not, they shouldn’t be a main character. Story is another word for change, or more accurately, character growth. Not character as in “fictional person”, character meaning “heart and soul”. Story is someone’s character changing, for better or worse. Main characters at the beginning of the story are lacking something vital, some knowledge of themselves, some knowledge of how to live a better life, and this void is ruining their lives. They must overcome these weaknesses, if they’re going to become complete, and reach a happy ending. There are two types of weaknesses: Psychological and Moral. Psychological ones only hurt the main character. Moral ones cause the main character to hurt other people. Easy.  

2) Goal: Characters exist because they want something. Desiring something, and the fight against opposition for that desire, is the lifeblood of story; and because character is story, it’s also desire that can breathe life into words on a page, and begin the process of creating a real person in a reader’s mind. It’s this ‘desire for something’ that sparks that first connection between reader and character. It makes us think “Well, now I have to find out if this person gets what they want.” This is a powerful link. (How many mediocre movies do we suffer through, when we could easily stop watching, because we’re still trapped by that question of “what happens?”) So if this is powerful enough to keep people watching an annoying movie, imagine how powerful it can be in an excellent story. 

Like in Up, the goal is to get the house to Paradise Falls.

3) Want: If the main character wants something, they want it for a darn good reason. Usually, they think that attaining the goal will fill the void they can sense in their lives, the deficiency they can feel, but don’t know how to fix. And they’re almost always wrong. Getting the goal doesn’t help anything; which is why, while pursuing that goal, they discover a deeper need that will heal them. Which brings us to …

4) Need/Elixir: Main characters are missing something, a weakness in their innermost selves is causing them to live a less-than-wonderful life. Through story, these main characters can be healed. Once they discover what’s missing, and accept it, and change the way they live to include this truth they’ve uncovered … they’re healed. Learning this truth, whatever it is, forms the purpose of the story for the main character. The reader, and the character, think the story is about achieving that big tangible goal the premise talks about; really, underneath it all, the story is about someone achieving a big intangible truth, that will ultimately save their life and future. Often, this need is exactly what the character fears or professes to hate. 

Like Finding Nemo, where Dory states exactly what Marlin needs to learn. 

5) Ghosts: 

Not this kind of ghosts.

Ghosts are events in your character’s past which mark the source of their weaknesses and strengths. Because these happened, the character became who they are. All we need to know about backstory are these moments, because who the character became is all we care about. There’s really only one ghost you absolutely need: the source of their moral and psychological weakness. Something happened that knocked the character’s world off kilter, and everything from that moment onward has been tainted by what happened. This moment haunts them (hence the name), and holds them back from uncovering that need that will heal their weaknesses. Pixar are masters of this: the source of Carl being stuck in the past, curmudgeonly, unable of loving anyone new? Ellie dying; his ghost. In Finding Nemo, the source of Marlin being suffocating, protective to the point of being harmful, possessive, and fearful? His wife and 99% of his children being eaten in front of him; his ghost. 

6) True Character: These are the strengths, values, convictions, fears, faults, beliefs, worldview, and outlook on life that make the main character who they truly are. 

7) Characterization: This is everything on the surface of a main character. The way they look, talk, act, etc. All of this originates from those deeper elements of their being, the strengths, values, ghosts, weaknesses, needs, that make them who they truly are. So often, you can think of this as a facade they’re projecting, a way to shield the the truth about themselves, how they wish to be perceived. The story, and the other characters, are slowly going to see deeper than this characterization, revealing more and more of the reasons it is the way it is. 

8) Arc: If the character is going to change from “Incomplete Person” to “Complete Person” there’s going to be a journey they go on to make that possible. The external story, the pursuit of that big tangible goal the premise is about, is causing an inner journey to take place. What they have to do in pursuit of that external goal will apply pressure to those weaknesses, and pressure causes change. This process has seven steps, but if I write it all here this post is going to be obscenely long. So I might wait and give this its own post.

9) Changed Person: Who is the character going to be at the end of this story? They better be different, or else the story didn’t work. How do they show how different they’ve become? What is the moral choice they make, that spins their trajectory from “the future doesn’t look so great” to “happily ever after”? This should be known right away, maybe even before anything else is settled about the character. This gives a distinct end goal, a way to work backwards, a destination in mind that you can navigate towards.  

10) Fascination and Illumination: The surface characterization, and the brief glimpses of the true character underneath create curiosity in the reader/audience. What the character says, and the implied subtext beneath the dialogue, creates a puzzle the audience wants to solve. Actions they take work the same way; if the writer indicates there’s deeper motivation behind why a character behaves in the way they do, we buy into solving that mystery right away. We can’t help it. “Who are you really? Why are you the way you are? And how is that going to effect the story?” These are all the unspoken, almost not consciously acknowledged, questions that fascinating characters provoke. Searching out meaning, connecting the dots to find the truth – we can’t resist this. We’re not fascinated by tons of backstory and exposition about a character; we’re fascinated by story, by mystery, by the technique of withholding information and having to interpret and hunt out the truth on our own.  So gradually, the story and the characters will force that character to reveal a little more, and a little more, until we have a complete picture of who this person is. Crucial that this information isn’t told up front. Gradually illuminate it. It’s just like getting to know a real person. 

So how does this work in a real character? Let’s take a look at Flynn Rider/Eugene Fitzherbert, because almost everybody has seen that movie. 

Moral Weaknesses: He’s selfish. He’s a little greedy. He’s a little rude. He uses his charisma and bravado to keep people at a distance from the real him. 

Psychological Weaknesses: Insecurity, fear of vulnerability, feels like the real him (Eugene) would be unwanted, unlovable, and have nothing – just like when he was an orphaned kid. Also, he doesn’t know who he wants to be, what he wants to live for. 

Goal: Flynn wants to get that crown. So he has to get Blondie to see the floating lights, so she’ll give it back to him, and then they can part ways as unlikely friends.  

Want: Why does he want the crown? What does it mean for him? He actually states it (reluctantly) in song: “I have dreams like you, no really. Just much less touchy feely. They mainly happen somewhere warm and sunny. On an island that I own, tanned and rested and alone. Surrounded by enormous piles of money.” He senses there’s something off in his life, something is missing. But he mistakenly believes this missing piece is money, which will allow him to buy a lonely island, where he can live out his days as Flynn and no one will ever know Eugene. 

Need: “All those days chasing down a daydream. All those years living in a blur. All that time never truly seeing, things the way they were. Now she’s here, shining in the starlight. Now she’s here, suddenly I know. If she’s here, it’s crystal clear, I’m where I’m meant to go.” He wants a crown … he needs to fall in love with Rapunzel. He needs to love something more than himself, and find out that love isn’t something to fear and push away. He needs to abandon the 'Tales of Flynnagin Rider’ ambition, and get a more worthwhile, new dream. 

Ghost: The source of all of his weaknesses can be linked to his “little bit of a downer” childhood as an orphan. Interestingly, he isn’t aware of another facet of that ghost, and Rapunzel points it out to him. “Was he a thief too?” she asks. He looks taken aback, before answering “Uh, no.” Something’s gone wrong. The choices he’s making are not living up to that original role model.  

Characterization: Flynn’s charming, funny, smart, charismatic, and arrogant (in a somehow charming sort of way). He’s also rude, contemptuous, and sarcastic. All traits that help him keep up that 'swashbuckling rogue’ facade, and push people away from the real him. 

True Character: Underneath all that, he’s a Disney prince. That pretty much sums it up.  

Changed Person: “Started going by Eugene again, stopped thieving, and basically turned it all around.” He started the story as the guarded and evasive Flynn, he ends as the selfless and thoroughly-in-love Eugene. 

Fascination and Illumination: Imagine if everything about Flynn had been told, right up front. We know he’s an orphan, we know he’s upheld a fake reputation, we know he’s a kind and loving guy underneath it all, we even know about his “tales of Flynnagin” childhood dream. You know what happens? We like him … but we’re not interested in him. There’s nothing we need to find out. There’s no curiosity. And if there’s no curiosity, and nothing being illuminated, your story’s not going anywhere. So instead, we find out – alongside Rapunzel – more about Flynn as the story progresses. And that is how it should be. 

So!

Developing characters in this way, I’ve found, really reduces worries about how “well-rounded” and three dimensional I’ve made them. They feel real to me. And besides helping me create characters, this ten element technique has also let me analyze characters I like, which is strangely fun. It’s a great way to figure out why a character works, what causes them to be so effective, and how you can go about creating them yourself. 

Yeah, I’m a bit of a nerd. 

But if you want, try it out. Develop a character. Analyze a character. You might find it as useful/fun as I do.

2

sixofcrowsnw challenge: take two ≡ best moment of your otp

kanej + religion

8

Now let’s go to sleep, I have a feeling I’ll be late for school tomorrow…

(spoiler alert, she couldn’t even sleep, she squealed in her bed until her alarm went off… and so did he) 

it took me…. so long…… to finish this….. it wasn’t supposed to get this long, holy shit……….

ANYWAY, ANON WHO REQUESTED A REVEAL, I hope you like this… I know this isn’t exactly what you asked for but it’s what i could do. also please pretend you can’t notice i had no idea what i was doing 

EDIT: the text is a bit hard to read, so I wrote it down under the cut: 

Keep reading

FAMITSU INTERVIEW SHARES NEW DETAILS ON SONIC MANIA, SONIC FORCES

- the third character in Forces will be an “unexpected character”
- Sonic Boom Sonic is NOT in the game
- the third character “plays an important role in the story, and embodies the overall features of the game”
- Sonic 3’s bonus stages seem likely to return in Sonic Mania
- “The boost system from Sonic Unleashed is present, as well as stages based on reaching the goal and clearing them a certain time limit also seem to be present.”
- “Classic Sonic stages are based on side scrolling 2D action" and will also have a twist
- Sonic Forces will be at E3 this year
- E3 will be where the third character will be revealed
- Sonic Forces story: “Dr. Eggman took over 99% of the world. Sonic and the “Resistance” members are fighting. Then another Sonic appears…”
- the reason why Eggman takes over so much of the world is because of “a new power” that his obtains
- this is the same power that makes classic Sonic appear
- Morio Kishimoto is the director of Sonic Forces
- Sonic Forces has been in development since 2013, and started around Sonic Lost World’s release
- “Forces was chosen as a subtitle from it meaning “power” and “army”. Two strong forces (Sonic and co vs. Eggman) are facing off in the game.”
- “This time, Sonic is fighting an Eggman who has nearly taken over the world.”
- the game won’t be all dark and gloomy, but there are some lighter stages in Forces
- Sonic Mania’s development began in 2015, as Sonic Team wanted to do a new 2D Sonic game and “not a remake”
- the general rule for the art of Sonic Mania was to be above the level of Genesis, but under the level of Saturn
- gameplay for Mania is similar to Sonic 3
- elemental shields were mentioned as returning

prompt 858

Kurt Vonnegut’s Advice on Short Stories

 1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things—reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them—in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia. 

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

The greatest American short story writer of my generation was Flannery O’Connor (1925-1964). She broke practically every one of my rules but the first. Great writers tend to do that.

                              –Kurt Vonnegut, preface to Bagombo Snuff Box

I wonder if Delirious looks like his GTA character or his fanarts..

deadline.com
‘Game Of Thrones’ Alexander Siddig Joins ‘Gotham’ As Archvillain Ra’s Al Ghul
Ra’s Al Ghul appeared on Arrow a few seasons back and it seemed only a matter of time until one of Batman’s deadliest foes showed up on Gotham next – and here the DC supervillain comes. Game …
By Dominic Patten

“Ra’s Al Ghul appeared on Arrow a few seasons back and it seemed only a matter of time until one of Batman’s deadliest foes showed up on Gotham next – and here the DC supervillain comes. Game of Thrones alum Alexander Siddig has been cast to play the head of the League of Shadows on Fox’s Dark Knight backstory series from Bruno Heller.

Currently on a late winter break, Gotham returns for the rest of its third season next month with Siddig’s Ra’s Al Ghul expected to make his on-screen debut soon afterwards. The character will be revealed on the show as David Mazouz’s young Bruce Wayne begins to finds out who is really behind the secret Court of Owls council that seems to run everything in Gotham.”

“Nothing even happened in Volume 4″

-Right from the start, we get a glimpse of how Grimm are created

-Introduction to three new bad guys, and one farm boy that Tumblr instantly gushes over.

-Ruby gets a new outfit in order to honor her fallen friends

-Jaune gets his weapon redesigned to honor his fallen partner

-Funny RNJR vs JNRR debate (started by the FNDM) included into the show

-Weiss stands up to her abusive father in public

-Weiss’ epic song and Weiss’ epic singing

-We learn why Blake ran from Vale, and she is justified

-Yang recovers from PTSD and depression

-Yang takes a bold step in accepting the use of a prothestetic arm

-Three new Grimm (four when including the character short) are revealed

-Three new faunus types

-New weapons

-”It’s also a gun” trope reoccurence

-”Looks human, is actually a Faunus” trope reoccurence

-We learn that Blake is essentially royalty

-Second Secondary Schnee Sibling™

-Lie Ren and Nora Valkyrie backstory

-Raven Branwen’s first appearance since Volume 2

-Branwen Backstory™

-Qrow “Birdman” Branwen

-Epic Qrow vs Tyrian fight

-Bad Luck Charm

-Qrow’s semblance is revealed and explained

-Remnant religion revealed

-Old STRQ shenanigans

-Sun and Blake team up in combat

-Klein the Butler as The Seven Dwarfs

-Posthumous Pyrrha™

-Zwei 

-Jaune comforting Ruby about her doubts to mirror Volume 1

-Sun comforting Blake

-Renora getting 99% confirmed

-Pumpkin Pete hoodie (which you can buy in the Rooster Teeth store!)

-Crocea Mors weapon upgrade

-Armed and Ready (full song)

-”We’re getting the gang back together!” hype

-Weiss being able to summon the Giant Armor

-No beloved character death

-”You BITCH!”

-Ozpin manipulating Oscar’s body 

-Qrow’s repeated nodding and smile at Oscar/Ozpin

-”For my mother.”

-”For my father.”

-”For all those that you’ve slain.”

-”For myself.”

I know a lot of this wasn’t plot crucial, but a lot of cool things still happened in Volume 4. 

Feel free to add more if you want.