Young-Empires

PSA: Reylo and Three Act Structure

“Johnson says that The Last Jedi offers “no one-to-one equivalent of the Han-to-Leia, burning, unrequited love. In our story, that’s not a centerpiece.”

- Vanity Fair, May 2017

No worries. This is Act Two (Ahch-To, if you will) of a story being told in three parts. We’re not going to see Kylo and Rey setting up housekeeping in The Last Jedi - that wouldn’t make any sense within the structure of the story.  Perhaps because we in the Reylo Fandom have spent so much time living with and dreaming about these characters, we tend to forget how far they still have to go in their respective journeys. 

Once it finally arrives, we’ll be mining TLJ just as we did TFA. We already know that we’ll be meeting a more human Kylo Ren for whom patricide isn’t really working out as he’d hoped, that Rey’s meeting with her hero isn’t going to go quite as expected, and that Luke Skywalker’s views on the Jedi have turned in what appears to be a pretty dark direction. We left TFA with the Resistance in tatters and on the run, and there’s no reason to think it’s going to get better for any of these characters in the upcoming film; in fact, I expect a writer/director of Rian Johnson’s talent to leave us in agony at the end of The Last Jedi. I was a young teen when Empire came out, and if Johnson doesn’t deliver at least that same level of excruciating having to wait-to-find-out-what-happens-next that I experienced back then, I’ll be disappointed.

1 CONFLICT / 2 CRISIS / 3 RESOLUTION

In short: We are approaching ACT TWO. It’s going to get worse before it gets better.

That doesn’t mean Reylo isn’t endgame. It just means it’s a sloooow burn - and we all know slow burns are the best. It’s worth noting what Reylo could look like within the universe of the film. It’s entirely possible that the blossoming of a full, canon relationship between Rey and Ben could be expressed in the final frames of Episode IX by something as small as these two characters turning towards each other, joining hands, or making freighted eye contact. 

Will the storytellers give us romantic Reylo on screen by the end of IX? I hope so. We’ll see. For such a long wait, I’d love to see that payoff for two lonely characters who are seeking belonging and family. In the meantime - well, I think Ao3 is at 3,000 Reylo titles and counting. 

You all don’t need me lecturing on the power of storytelling. Keep the faith. All will be well.

tl;dr: If you want ammo for ant battles (though seriously, just have a block party, it saves time and aggravation) feel free to make use of this explanation of three-act structure, pulled straight from Wikipedia:


Three Act Structure:

The first act is usually used for exposition, to establish the main characters, their relationships and the world they live in. Later in the first act, a dynamic, on-screen incident occurs that confronts the main character (the protagonist), whose attempts to deal with this incident lead to a second and more dramatic situation, known as the first turning point, which (a) signals the end of the first act, (b) ensures life will never be the same again for the protagonist and © raises a dramatic question that will be answered in the climax of the film. The dramatic question should be framed in terms of the protagonist’s call to action, (Will X recover the diamond? Will Y get the girl? Will Z capture the killer?).[1] This is known as the inciting incident, or catalyst. As an example, the inciting incident in the 1972 film The Godfather is when Vito Corleone is attacked, which occurs approximately 40 minutes into the film.

The second act, also referred to as “rising action”, typically depicts the protagonist’s attempt to resolve the problem initiated by the first turning point, only to find him- or herself in ever worsening situations. Part of the reason protagonists seem unable to resolve their problems is because they do not yet have the skills to deal with the forces of antagonism that confront them. They must not only learn new skills but arrive at a higher sense of awareness of who they are and what they are capable of, in order to deal with their predicament, which in turn changes who they are. This is referred to as character development or a character arc. This cannot be achieved alone and they are usually aided and abetted by mentors and co-protagonists.[1]

The third act features the resolution of the story and its subplots. The climax is the scene or sequence in which the main tensions of the story are brought to their most intense point and the dramatic question answered, leaving the protagonist and other characters with a new sense of who they really are.[1]

“That Luke is so changed a person presented Johnson with rich narrative opportunities. The Last Jedi is to a large extent about the relationship between Luke and Rey, but Johnson cautions against any “one-to-one correlation” between, say, Yoda’s tutelage of young Luke in The Empire Strikes Back and old Luke’s tutelage of Rey. ‘There’s a training element to it,’ he said, ‘but it’s not exactly what you would expect.’ This being the spoiler-averse world of Lucasfilm, the production company behind the Star Wars movies, that’s about as specific as the director is willing to get.“

Rian Johnson once again pushing Key Relationship™ with Luke & Rey, whoops!

Evangeline

Has anyone else thought about the fact that while Aelin and her court have been out fighting evil and building an army that young smart Evangeline has been at court. Evangeline who takes all of her orders seriously and was told to work her magic on “these miserable old men”. All I can imagine is a young girl spinning tales not of the dark and horrible assassin, but of the kind, brave, loving queen. A woman she looks up to, a woman who would do and give anything to protect not just her people but all innocents, a woman who has taken on the world and won, a woman who will free all people, a woman who should he their queen. I really think there will be some interesting stories going around that court because of a dedicated beautiful young mind.

Young Empires slay it on this spectacular new tune, The Gates. The Toronto based trio go full on hot blooded and passionate on the explosive dance music meets electro pop and rock song. The vibrant track is a taste off Young Empires’ debut album, slated for later this year. Color me suddenly much interested in said album. The band says that the song is about fighting through depressing and self doubt.

Made with SoundCloud
More Humans are Space Orcs

So I really enjoyed writing short piece Of Humans are Space Orcs Fiction So I have decided to write some more the two aliens are the same as my last piece of fiction, they have names now The Hanar is Maknor and the SubHanar is Darni they are Akamari and they serve aboard the Akamari Warship Blade-of-Joy.

“My Hanar I have more questions about the Humans?”

My Subhanar the Database should have any information you would need to know them"

“yes my Hanar It does but I am confused about their actions they are……Contradictory. The young Subhanar says with confused on their face

"That my young Subhanar, like the Great Bird of the Galaxy, and were the legendary Ganal Race vanished to, is one of the great mysteries of the Galaxy, why Humans are Humans! You know, of course, they out trade most Species in the Galaxy bar the Dorgoa and yet nobody has Clue as were there Homeworld is and yet from what they tell us it would Hold a Zakana-nundo Classification, it is a Violent world from all accounts, which no species would want to claim in their right mind.

They have been known to fight one another and yet as many a boka has found out in a Drinkhouse brawl, attack one human their fellows will more than likely come to their aid and. As you have learnt my young Subhanar the Xerti Empire Found this out there cost when they attacked the Human states, it was like they had kicked over a nest of Dokoran Death Bats, to use the word Violent to describe the human defence and later counter attack would do that word a grave understatement. But their War vessels are more than able to be emissaries of peace, as well as bringers of war, I find that that is something you should remember Subhanar never take a human as you see them they are like their War Vessels they are capable of more than one task.

Now be about your tasks Subhanar we have to take Provisions aboard soon”

;; Just a little information as we keep in mind 4.0 and new revelations from the most recent keynote:

The Empire launched its campaign against Othard as a whole in the year 1528, and Doma eventually fell and was annexed by Garlemald in the year 1552. It’s subjugated even before Ala Mhigo, which falls to the Empire five years later in 1557 – it just seems like Ala Mhigo was conquered first because we only heard about Doma’s fall partway through A Realm Reborn, and we also didn’t get additional information concerning where Doma was on the timeline until the lore book was released. Othard has dealt with trying to fend off the Empire for a long time and has been occupied quite a while, something to remember as we move forward with assisting the various resistances.

The rebellion in Doma also succeeded in taking back the nation’s capital city temporarily before being eventually crushed when the Empire turned its attentions back on Othard following the complications concerning succession back home in Garlemald. Also considering how long they resisted the Empire prior to its first fall, Doma is – or was – a nation not to be taken lightly.

Hingashi isn’t actually part of Doma but is a separate nation entirely:

“One group, lead by Yugiri, boarded a great galleon, and in their panic made east across the Ruby Tide for the island nation of Hingashi. Alas, this nation would not risk inviting Garlemald’s ire, and turned away the Domans.” (Encyclopedia Eorzea, pg. 196)

It’s mentioned on the slides as being a nation of its own, but it’s easy to lump in in as part of Doma and call it Doman housing because of the similar aesthetics. Doma and Hingashi were/are separate nations! Hingashi sounds a bit like Othard’s answer to Ishgard, given its history of isolationism and its desire to keep its boundaries closed to foreigners. It seems to have a history of keeping itself largely neutral and self-contained, as well.

A little background information on Yugiri, now that she’s likely returning to the story in an expanded capacity:

“Having witnessed the terrors wrought by the Garlean Empire, a young Yugiri made the pilgrimage from her Raen home to the village of the shinobi, seeking tools with which she might fight the Empire. Through years of inhuman trials, she learned the ways of the shinobi – how to fight from the shadows – eventually earning the rank of “jonin.” Having thus mastered ninjutsu and being given the epithet “Mistwalker,” she pledged herself to the remnants of the Doman general’s clan. Thereafter, she waged a war against the Garlean Amy. Alas, the rebellion ended in defeat, and the Domans lost everything. Obeying her lord’s orders, Yugiri led a number of her countrymen in flight. Though the journey was long and arduous, she never allowed her people to despair, and, at the end, found them a new home. At twenty-six summers, she continues her fight alongside the Scions and the Eorzean Alliance, but has not once forgotten about her homeland or her people’s desire to one day return. Her lone indulgence is a bowl of rice doused in warm soup and topped with a small pinch of ground white radish – a Doman delicacy.” (Encyclopedia Eorzea, pg. 196)

And finally, some about Othard in general and its geography:

“Othard, or the Far East, as it is commonly referred to by those living in the west, is the smallest of the Three Great Continents, yet much like Aldenard in that it is comprised of a main landmass and countless islands off its coasts. While Aldenard is longitudinally situated farther south than Ilsabard, the towering spires which line the region’s northern border are covered in snow year-round, and the land beyond them is predominantly frozen. From these mountains trickles down the water which gives Othard life, eventually forming the One River – the longest and widest watercourse in all the Three Continents. This river passes through the great swath of grasslands in which the Auri Xaela clans live before winding through Yanxia – a fertile land that, until the recent invasion by the Garlean Empire, was controlled by the nation of Doma.

Though connected geographically, for thousands of years little interaction has taken place between Ilsabard and Othard, the main reason being a combination of near-impassable mountain ranges and deadly wastelands which severely restrict all land routes. While coastal cities have experienced limited contact with the outside via trade, the overall isolation of Othard has allowed local cultures to evolve with little to no influence from the west. Only in the past two decades have things begun to change – the advent of airship technology thrusting open the once-closed doors of the Far East. However, this new exposure also served to alert the power-hungry Garleans of new territory ripe for the plucking and it was not long before the Empire had set their sights on Doma and Dalmasca – two nations which have since been brought under the imperial standard.” (Encyclopedia Eorzea, pg. 12)

Also, this mostly my own personal thoughts, but I think it makes a lot of sense to be including both Doma and Othard in Stormblood, and that’s beyond just talking about similarities to Ala Mhigo. I definitely don’t want to talk down the really excellent opportunities to compare and contrast how the Empire handled Doma vs. Ala Mhigo and how the resistances will likely be very different, as well… but on the other hand, remember that the Meteor Project was born on Othard. It was tested on Othard. It failed and was revised on Othard. Remember what we’re faced with at the end of 3.5? What’s potentially alluded to in the 3.5 trailer with Nero’s dialogue and some of the images? And now that we’re heading to Othard again? Yeah. Might be a chance to expand some on the Meteor Project and a possible revival/revision/redirection of that knowledge and idea concerning the primal that’s hanging in the sky over the Wall, depending on what happens in 3.55. We’ll see!

Young Empires are a Canadian band who have very recently dropped this track “Under Your Eyes” leading up to the bands album release The Gates out on September 4th. What I love about this track more than the actual melody and production are the incredibly deep and sentimental lyrics. The band spoke of the lyrics and to quote “The song is about personal demons and looking within one’s self to overcome internal struggles and challenges. The idea of shutting and opening ‘eyes’ is symbolic of this. 'Eyes’ are the gateway to the soul, so they say.“. If you love what you hear then make sure to purchase the album soon! - Ali

You go downstairs and confront your custodian, which is another term for a frightening beast known as a LUSUS NATURAE. 

OH GOOD! 

Your lusus has looked after you since you were very young in lieu of any biological parents, whom you have never known. No young troll ever knows his or her blood parents, nor could such lineage ever be accurately traced. Adult trolls supply their genetic material to the FILIAL PAILS carried by imperial drones and offered to the monstrous MOTHER GRUB deep underground in the brooding caverns. She then combines all the genetic material into one diabolical incestuous slurry, and lays hundreds of thousands of eggs at once. 

Mechanically speaking, that doesn’t sound too different from how the paradox clones were created.

The eggs hatch into young larval trolls which wriggle about to locate a cozy stalactite from which to spin their cocoons. After they pupate, the young troll with his or her newfound limbs undergoes a series of dangerous trials. If they survive, they are chosen by a member of the diverse and terrifying subterranean monster population native to Alternia. This creature becomes the troll’s lusus, and together they surface and choose a location to build a hive. The building process is facilitated by CARPENTER DROIDS left on the planet to cater to the young. But only for building. They’re on their own otherwise. 

It sounds like custodians come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Karkat’s guardian is a crab-like monster. Gamzee called his guardian a goat, and given his zodiac sign I’m taking him at his word on that. 

The vast majority of adult trolls are off-planet, serving some role in the forces of ongoing imperial conquest, besieging other star systems in the name of Alternian glory. The culture and civilization on the homeworld is maintained almost entirely by the young. 

There’s an Alternian Empire vs Diamond Authority fanfic out there, isn’t there? If there’s not, there should be. The Steven Universe fandom has been wondering why Homeworld is so militaristic for a while now. They must be fighting something besides the Crystal Gems.

Trolls sure are weird!

Sure are!

Sometimes I think about the horrifying possibility that the Avatar world might eventually have their their own equivalent of Weeaboos and Wehraboos. 

And also, the equivalent of those Hitler youth and young Stalin fan girls that obsess over young Earth Empire/Fire Nation soldiers like they’re their new cute boy crush, and not young men and women forced to fight a war. 

While Wiccan grew up in a steady solemn environment, Tommy finds himself from foster home to foster home, eventually making a life for himself as a smuggler. With a ragtag crew and a Corellian YT-2400 he so lovingly named, Speed, he held a record for the Kessel run in such a short period that the news never broke before some guy named Han Solo beat it.

Star Wars: The House of M.
Where Genosha is a planet, Mutants are an alien race,
and the House of Magnus reigns supreme
under the banner of the Galactic Empire.

The Last Jedi is to a large extent about the relationship between Luke [Skywalker] and Rey, but [Rian] Johnson cautions against any “one-to-one correlation” between, say, Yoda’s tutelage of young Luke in The Empire Strikes Back and old Luke’s tutelage of Rey. ‘There’s a training element to it,” he said, “but it’s not exactly what you would expect.’
—  David Kamp’s Vanity Fair cover story on The Last Jedi. [x]