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Solar Eclipse Safety

Shockingly, I haven’t seen one post about this yet. But the solar eclipse is happening right away and I want this solidly spoken:

Do Not Look At The Sun.

The light from the sun is HIGHLY concentrated and you can and will go BLIND if you look at it. From what I have heard, the ONLY way to look at the sun during the eclipse is through #14 or higher welding glasses or specially designed eclipse glasses.

  • Do Not Try To Make Your Own Lenses That Are Not The Proper Welding Transparency or Specially Designed For Viewing The Eclipse

The eclipse can and will ruin your camera lenses as well unless you have a special solar lense in use.

  • Do Not Try To View The Eclipse Through Your Camera Lense, It Will Still Harm Your Eyes

Please do not stare at the sun or even glance up at the eclipse. Don’t be afraid, but please be aware.

Bring Your Animals Inside

The eclipse could harm them as well, although chances are slim they will even notice. If you are able, keep them inside and away from the windows.

Be Safe!

Kiss your own fingertips, and hug your own curves. You are made of waves and honey and spicy pepper when it’s necessary. You ARE a goddess, I hope you haven’t forgotten.
—  Emery Allen
Everything You Need to Know About the Aug. 21 Eclipse

On Aug. 21, all of North America will experience a solar eclipse.

If skies are clear, eclipse-watchers will be able to see a partial solar eclipse over several hours, and some people – within the narrow path of totality – will see a total solar eclipse for a few moments.

How to Watch

It’s never safe to look at the Sun, and an eclipse is no exception. During a partial eclipse (or on any regular day) you must use special solar filters or an indirect viewing method to watch the Sun.

If you have solar viewing glasses, check to make sure they’re safe and undamaged before using them to look at the Sun. Make sure you put them on before looking up at the Sun, and look away before removing them. Eclipse glasses can be used over your regular eyeglasses, but they should never be used when looking through telescopes, binoculars, camera viewfinders, or any other optical device.

If you don’t have eclipse glasses, you can still watch the eclipse indirectly! You can make a pinhole projector out of a box, or use any other object with tiny holes – like a piece of cardstock with a hole, or your outstretched, interlaced fingers – to project an image of the partially eclipsed Sun onto the ground.

Of course, if it’s cloudy (or you’d just rather stay inside), you can watch the whole thing online with us at nasa.gov/eclipselive. Tune in starting at noon ET.

If you’re in the path of totality, there will be a few brief moments when it is safe to look directly at the eclipse. Only once the Moon has completely covered the Sun and there is no light shining through is it safe to look at the eclipse. Make sure you put your eclipse glasses back on or return to indirect viewing before the first flash of sunlight appears around the Moon’s edge.

Why do eclipses happen?

A solar eclipse happens when the Moon passes directly between the Sun and Earth, casting its shadow down on Earth’s surface. The path of totality – where the Moon completely covers the Sun – is traced out by the Moon’s inner shadow, the umbra. People within the Moon’s outer shadow, the penumbra, can see a partial eclipse.

The Moon’s orbit around Earth is tilted by about five degrees, meaning that its shadow usually doesn’t fall on Earth. Only when the Moon lines up exactly between the Sun and Earth do we see an eclipse.

Though the Sun is about 400 times wider than the Moon, it is also about 400 times farther away, making their apparent sizes match up almost exactly. This is what allows the Moon to block out the Sun’s bright face, while revealing the comparatively faint, pearly-white corona.

The Science of Eclipses

Eclipses are a beautiful sight to see, and they’re also helpful for our scientists, so we’re funding eleven ground-based science investigations to learn more about the Sun and Earth.

Total solar eclipses reveal the innermost regions of the Sun’s atmosphere, the corona. Though it’s thought to house the processes that kick-start much of the space weather that can influence Earth, as well as heating the whole corona to extraordinarily high temperatures, we can’t study this region at any other time. This is because coronagraphs – the instruments we use to study the Sun’s atmosphere by creating artificial eclipses – must cover up much of the corona, as well as the Sun’s face in order to produce clear images.

Eclipses also give us the chance to study Earth’s atmosphere under uncommon conditions: the sudden loss of solar radiation from within the Moon’s shadow. We’ll be studying the responses of both Earth’s ionosphere – the region of charged particles in the upper atmosphere – and the lower atmosphere.

Learn all about the Aug. 21 eclipse at eclipse2017.nasa.gov, and follow @NASASun on Twitter and NASA Sun Science on Facebook for more. Watch the eclipse through the eyes of NASA at nasa.gov/eclipselive starting at 12 PM ET on Aug. 21. 

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

You are everything good in this world.
—  Poets Love Her

Daily reminder: You are so special and I am so happy that you are alive!!!

We are made to be together because you can handle me like nobody else.
—  Poets Love Her

Daily reminder: You are and always will be enough!!!!

From the bottom of my heart, thank you for having been by my side through everything when people have let me down and hurt me. I wouldn’t been able to handle all my battles without you my love, and that’s something I hope you’ll remember forever, because there are not many people like you. You are too valuable to be one in the crowd of all the 7 billion people.
—  Poets Love Her
If I could give you one thing in life,I would give you the ability to see yourself through my eyes.
—  Only then,you would realize how special you are to me.
The truth is, unless you let go, unless you forgive yourself, unless you forgive the situation, unless you realize the situation is over, you cannot move forward.
—  Steve Maraboli