World-Financial-Center

Aerial view loking southeast of the new World Financial Center’s (Cesar Pelli, 1985-1988) skyscrapers in Battery Park City in the fall of 1987. Buildings at left are the 4 WFC (Merrill Lynch. 1986), 3 WFC (American Express. 1985). The glass arches of Winter Garden are visible at center. The new 2 WFC (Merrill Lynch, 1988) nearing completion are at right. The 110-story Twin Towers of World Trade Center (Minoru Yamasaki-Emery Roth & Sons, 1973-74. Destroyed 2001) are visible behind the new posmodernist complex.

Photo: Unknown.

Source: Michael George “New York Today” (New York, Harry N. Abrams, 1988)

Paul Pfeiffer
Orpheus Descending
2001
Video installation.
World Trade Center and
World Financial Center,
April 15—June 28, 2001.

The new Battery Park City’s World Financial Center (Cesar Pelli & Associates, 1982-1988) and Twin Towers of World Trade Center (Minoru Yamasaki-Emery Roth & Sons, 1973) in this view looking northeast from Hudson River. Summer, 1989.

Photo: Unknown.

Source: Bill Harris. “New York. A picture memory”. New York, Crescent Books, 1990.

The recently restored Statue of Liberty with its new golden torch and Lower Manhattan skyscrapers in the distance in the Spring of 1987.

The 110-story Twin Towers of World Trade Center (Minoru Yamasaki-Emery Roth & Sons, 1973-74), at center, domiantes the skyline. Behind it appears the new 48-story 7 World Trade Center (Emery Roth & Sons, 1988) under construcion. The new posmodernist skyscrapers of World Financial Center (Cesar Pelli, 1985-1988), at Battery Park City’s development is at left, including the 51-story, piramidal-rooftop, 3 WFC (American Express) Building (1985) and the new 44-story round-dome 2 WFC (Merrill Lynch) Building (1988) under construction. The Woolworth Building (Cass Gilbert, 1913) and the 54-story One Liberty Plaza (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1973) are visibles at right.

Photo: Unknown.

Source: Michael George “New York Today” (New York, Harry N. Abrams, 1988)

The Twin Towers of World Trade Center (Minoru Yamasaki-Emery Roth & Sons, 1973. Destroyed, 2001), with the new posmodernist skyscrapers of World Financial Center (Cesar Pelli & Associates, 1982-1988), in Battery Park City, nearing completion in this view looking northeast from Jersey City in Summer of 1987. The old neo-gothic Woolworth Building (Cass Gilbert, 1913) can be seen at center, between the Twin Towers.

Photo: Unknown.

Source: Michael George “New York Today” (New York, Harry N. Abrams, 1988)

10


Mitakihara City’s Architecture

1. Weltstadthaus - Cologne, Germany.

2. Matsugaya Station of Tama Monorail - Hachioji, Tokyo

3. A typical bus stop - Curitiba, Brazil

4. The Milan Cathedral - Milan, Italy

5. Shanghai World Financial Center - Shanghai, China

6. Kejonuma Leisure Land Ferris Wheel - Miyagi Prefecture, Japan

7. Helix Bridge - Singapore

8. Yokohama port areaNaka-ku, Yokohama

9. Berlin Central StationBerlin, Germany

10. The Gunma Prefectual Government Building Maebashi, Japan

10

Life inside Caracas’ unfinished skyscraper Centro Financiero Confinanzas, the world’s tallest slum

It was meant to be world financial center and the third-tallest building in all of Venezuela, known for its sprawling cities and staggering inequality. But in 1994, construction was halted on the building after four years thanks to a banking crisis that saw 17 of the nation’s 49 commercial banks fail. Over time, the abandoned building was colonized by squatters from nearby slums. Today, the tower is the world’s largest vertical slum — dubbed “Torre David,” or “Tower of David,” by residents — the structure hosts a self-contained community of roughly 3,000 people in over 750 families spanning 45 floors, each with their own shops and services. Residents pay a $32 monthly condo fee for 24-hour armed security and run a co-operative mini-government, with non-compliance for the rules being punished with “social work” like chores and repairs around the building.

Read more | Follow policymic