Wolverine-&-the-X-Men

Ronald Wimberly is an African-American cartoonist who has done a lot of work recently for Marvel (Wolverine & the X-men and She-Hulk most notably). In the short comic Lighten Up for Medium.com’s The Nib, Wimberly discusses race and skin color and how comic book colorists (and their editors) handle it. How to choose the right skin tone for ethnic characters can result in some uncomfortable editorial mandates, especially when those editors are white.

Wimberly’s description of skin color context is almost reminiscent of the whole online white-gold/blue-black dress debate from a couple of weeks back, in that it examines how color can rely a lot on other environmental factors and our own biology. Give it a read here.

You know, if there’s any other reason to enjoy TSSM because of writing, characterization and faithfulness to the material?  Same reason I enjoy the DCAU and Young Justice.

In my mind they’ve been the perfect marriage between Silver Age and Modern Age comics.  Good at crafting serious stories and getting dark, but unapologetic for the fun moment or comic bookish elements.

Actually same can be said about the A:EMH and Wolverine & The X-Men.  Best of both the Silver and Modern.

Opinions?


I love all those shows

Rachel & Miles have really talked up New Mutants, but I’m not feeling it that much.

I guess the kind of stuff I want out of X-school books is more like what they do in  Wolverine & The X-men/Spider-man and The X-men.

The Future of the X-Men Film Franchise After Apocalypse & Wolverine 3

The Future of the X-Men Film Franchise After Apocalypse & Wolverine 3

After X-Men: Apocalypse, Jennifer Lawrence is done with the franchise, and Nicholas Hoult isn’t exactly closing the door but his First Class contract will finally be up. Bye-bye, Mystique and Beast. After Wolverine 3, Hugh Jackman is hanging up the adamantium claws, or at least that’s what we think he meant when he posted “One Last Time” along with a picture of Wolverine’s claws on Instagram this…

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