William-Wallace

Braveheart: William Wallace [ENFJ]

OFFICIAL TYPING by Teilani | enfjs-r-us 

Extroverted Feeling (Fe): “Men dont follow titles, they follow courage.” Wallace sees strength in unity; he understands the importance of uniting the clans of Scotland in overthrowing the English, and is frustrated by the clans tendency to quarrel amongst themselves. Wallace inspires by pure emotion and empathy, he knows what the clans need to hear when shaking in their boots from fear and cold; sometimes it isn’t much, just to remember that life isn’t worth living unless you have freedom…

Introverted Intuition (Ni): “What would you do with out freedom?”. Freedom, Wallaces last word. Wallace is able to envision a Scotland that is its own entity, and recognize any other Scotland is not worth living in; Wallace’s primary dream however, was to live in peace, start a family and settle down with the girl he loved since childhood. Freedom becomes the means to this end (if not for him, for future generations) once his dreams are bashed, and his plot to relieve Scotland from the holds of England ensue out of vengeance for his love, Murron. 

Extroverted Sensing (Se): Quick, decisive, purposeful, Wallace understands how his surroundings can work for him and uses them to his advantage. Wallace sometimes uses this function in support to his Ni (such as when he orders his men to carve spears “twice the length of men” to use on the front lines), enabling him to practically anticipate what is likely to ensue once on the battle field. Wallace is also able to act and cope very well in the moment (in the case of hand to hand combat) an ability inherently unnatural, but acquired by the years of training he received from his Uncle. 

Introverted Thinking Ti: Wallace is strategic, he is able to spot weakness in an opposing army; like when ordering the Irish clans to fein running away and instead circle around to attack from the rear. Wallace also manages objectivity. Even though Wallace fights for peace, when the King of England offers peace to Scotland – if Wallace were to consent to his wills –  Wallace understands the king to be too conniving to deliver on his promises, regardless of an agreement and refuses.

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‘Braveheart’, Mel Gibson (1996)

In the Year of our Lord 1314, patriots of Scotland - starving and outnumbered - charged the fields of Bannockburn. They fought like warrior poets; they fought like Scotsmen, and won their freedom.

Yes!, Fight and you may die. Run and you will live at least awhile. And dying in your bed many years from now, would you be willing to trade all the days from this day to that for one chance, just one chance , to come back here as young men and tell our enemies that they may take our lives but they will never take our freedom!!!

First of all, Wallace wasn’t an unwashed commoner in a shit-caked kilt. He was an unwashed knight hailing from a privileged family, and he wore expensive armor. As we’ve explained before, the kilt wouldn’t even exist until 400 years after Wallace’s death, and in medieval times, plaid wool skirts would have been about as useful on the battlefield as Nerf swords.

As a prominent landowner whose father most likely served in the household of King David I, Wallace’s killin’ getup would have consisted of gauntlets, a helmet, and custom-made plate armor. And once he was appointed “Guardian of Scotland,” the de facto Scottish head of state, chances are you wouldn’t find a trace of caked shit anywhere on his shiny, metal breeches.

Most of Braveheart’s take on Wallace actually comes from The Wallace, a romanticized (meaning: “made up”) poem written over 170 years after his death by a poet named Blind Harry. More reliable sources, on the other hand, paint a vastly different portrait of Wallace: that of an impetuous, hotheaded knight, “pleasing in appearance but with a wild look,” and sporting a giant beard.

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Yes!, Fight and you may die. Run and you will live at least awhile. And dying in your bed many years from now, would you be willing to trade all the days from this day to that for one chance, just one cahnce, to come back here as young men and tell our enemies that they may take our lives but they will never take our freedom!