Will-Steacy

Will Steacy, “Grampa,” from the portfolio “Awash.”

On a visit to New Orleans a few weeks after Hurricane Katrina, Steacy began to photograph ordinary Polaroids and snapshots that had been washed around in the flood. The waters had damaged the photographs, blurring and staining them and transforming them from one form of memory to another. According to Steacy, it was what it would be like to photograph ghosts.

Yeah I agree bad writing, took them almost two paragraphs to explain what the fuck was printed on those 400 pages. And so is this now the divide: photographers who shoot with a camera and edit their own pictures vs. photographers who appropriate the trillion photographs already floating around in the world and edit a selection of these found photographs. Do you even have to take photographs anymore to call yourself a photographer? Or has the medium itself been abandoned by the gutless and ball-less millennial generation who is too afraid to do any real work or come up with any real idea of their own, and so since they already sit in front of screen 14 hrs a day, why not just take cool pics I find on the Internet and make my tumblr feed my senior thesis, shit maybe some brainless and blind publisher will print it because in their world of blackness they saw a momentary flash and glimmer of the next big thing: instead of bookmarking the tumblr feed in your browser why not print it and bookshelf it in your home….I mean we still gotta produce things to go on the walls and bookshelves otherwise that will put a whole breed of interior designers and architects out of work.


Ehh, fuck it, we are all gonna be out of work. My next project is taking 4x5 photos attached to a drone of amazon.com warehouses.

—  Texting with Will Steacy
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Deadline | Will Steacy | Via

With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.

Capturing the frenzied scenes of the newsroom and printing plant, Steacy highlights the unwavering dedication of the Inquirer staff, whose commitment to reportage faces an uphill battle against larger media corporations. In these strewn papers and furrowed brows, we find a steadfast allegiance to integrity, a desire to inform the public of the sometimes disturbing truths that affect our lives. Set against the hustle and bustle of the newsroom are tragically empty spaces, rooms cleared out and abandoned through financial necessity. Ultimately, Deadline is an urgent call to action on behalf of not only those newspaper staff members left jobless but on behalf of our country and its citizens, our shared past, and an uncertain future.

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Marvel Fanfare # 45 ~ the All PinUps Issue!
(Part 2 of 4)

-Green Goblin by Paul Smith
-Hela by Brett Blevins
-Hulk (Joe Fixit) by Norm Breyfogle
-Iron Man and his Armors by Bob Layton
-the Original Iron Man Armor by Ken Steacy
-Ka-Zar, Shanna the She Devil, and Zabu by Brent Anderson
-Killraven by P. Craig Russell
-Loki by John Buscema
-Magik by Bill Sienkiewicz
-Medusa and Black Bolt by Charles Vess

I think in all of us there’s a sense of optimism about things, however grim the situation may be. It defines human nature, the way we fight through difficult times. Resiliency is what it is to be alive. It’s all about marching through and putting up with the difficult times, with the hope that a better day will arrive.
—  Photographer Will Steacy on the core driving force of his recent work
WESTWARD BOUND

ISSUES WITH ROADTRIP PHOTOGRAPHY

By Matthew Flores

* * *

A dusty stretch of road, cleaving its way through far-off, majestic spines of snowcapped mountains. An open vista of turbulent ocean, battering against rugged cliffs and foreboding boulders. A heroically battered vehicle, practically bursting at the seams with tents, surfboards, sleeping bags, and clear-eyed young adults (always the coolest kids you know) sporting a perfectly positioned cigarette and a pair of gleaming Ray Bans. Few things are as synonymous with summertime as the road trip, and, likewise, few photographic genres resonate as clearly with the season as the road trip series. 

Because of its visual allure and popularity, road trip photography has become almost ubiquitous in contemporary visual culture. While certainly not a new development, this genre of photography has recently delved into occasionally troubling thematic waters. If it can be taken seriously, these issues need to be addressed and considered when analyzing a body of work identified with the road trip.

Keep reading

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‘Deadline’: A Fascinating Look Behind the Scenes of a Struggling Philadelphia Newspaper

With the increased presence of large-scale media conglomerates and online news forums, the newspaper industry has taken a disastrous hit, yet over half of American citizens remain unaware of the trials now facing our trusted journalists and photographers. For Deadline, photographer Will Steacy confronts the brutal truth of contemporary news by photographing the historic offices of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where his father worked for decades.

(Continue Reading)