Weimar Germany

Cabinet Logic http://ift.tt/20ww7cr by Shannon Mattern

On January 20 I presented “Cabinet Logic: A History, Critique, and Consultation on Media Furnishings” at the IKKM in Weimar, Germany.

Shannon Mattern : Cabinet Logic – A History, Critique, and Consultation on Media Furniture from IKKM on Vimeo.

While the material qualities of our media technologies, and our material engagements with them, have evolved over the millennia – and particularly within the past decade – we still rely on physical supports, furnishings, to scaffold our interactions with media. Even “the cloud” that seems to float above us today relies on heavy architecture for its operation. These furnishings – bookshelves, desks, charging stations, server racks, and even beds, as more and more of us not only read but also watch movies and tackle emails from under the sheets – serve as material supports for the storage and delivery of media resources, while they also frame organizational systems and embody particular technical protocols. These structures render complex intellectual and political ideas material and empirical. In this project I aim to study how the design of organizational furnishings, both physical and conceptual, give form to epistemology, politics, and affect.

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http://ift.tt/20ww7ct

Speaking in Silence
Bui Thanh Hieu
Genre: Politics & Current Events
Price: Get
Publish Date: August 13, 2015

In the holiday paradise Vietnam, social media are allowed only to provide and exchange personal information. Bloggers and cyberdissidents who dare to question the government’s legitimacy or domestic policies are ruthlessly suppressed. Political blogger Bui Thanh Hieu (1972) nevertheless uses the Internet to criticize politically hot topics, such as Vietnam’s territorial claims within China as well as its handling of land disputes with the Catholic Church. In response to this, Hieu was arrested, his computers confiscated. The license for his Internet café in Hanoi was revoked. Hieu persisted however: his blog was being read by up to 15,000 visitors per day. Because of his commitment, he was arrested and detained on numerous occasions. At the invitation of the city of Weimar, Germany, he was finally able to leave the country. There he finished Speaking in Silence . In this short story he laments, with humour and irony, the behaviour of civil servants of the special judicial, administrative and technological strike force, who control online information. A publication of the Eva Tas Foundation.  The Eva Tas Foundation encourages publication and promotion of texts that are, no matter where and no matter how, subject to censorship.

The Chairman Kaiser! It’ll Surprise Yer! SsangYong Gets Dubious with Names

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While Volkswagen has done an admirable job of keeping W.O. Bentley’s name at the forefront of the ultra-luxe brand he founded, and the Charles Rolls/Henry Royce duo looms large in the minds of gearheads with sybaritic tendencies, your average layman gives not two whits about the men behind the names; the brand is all. So when South Korean automaker SsangYong needed a name for the next generation of their Chairman executive sedan, they went straight for pre-Weimar Germany and appropriated the name of the kaiser!

Regrettably, they did not name the new machine the Chairman Wilhelm II. Then again, given the man’s role in a conflagration that consumed Europe and the Middle East, perhaps that was a smart business decision. Instead, they simply called the thing the Chairman Kaiser, which to American ears, anyway, sounds like more of a tribute to American industrialist and health-insurance pioneer Henry J. Kaiser.

For a brief period, Kaiser’s name adorned a line of automobiles. Upon Kaiser Motors’ merger with Willys-Overland, the company quickly went in all in on the line of utes derived from the Willys Jeep, ultimately renaming the company Kaiser Jeep in 1963. The Kaiser Jeep brand lasted only until 1970, when AMC absorbed the four-wheelin’ marque.

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The Kaiser will be a zootier version of this, the Ssangyong Chairman W.

But the SsangYong Kaiser apparently has nothing to do with Jeep at all, aside from the fact that the Grand Cherokee shares underpinnings with Mercedes utes and the Chairman Kaiser utilizes Benz powertrain components, including a 300-hp 5.0-liter V-8 as the top-line engine choice. Wards Auto quotes a SsangYong spokesman thusly: “In German it means emperor, higher than a king. And like the name ‘Chairman,’ it means dignity. It is a vehicle for people who care and have dignity. It’s a good name.”





Would it be churlish to point out that Wilhelm II, the last of the kaisers, died in exile, responsible for the destruction of a continent and the death of a generation of young men, having left the ground open for the rise of one of the most malevolent totalitarian regimes ever to know power? Yes? Okay then, SsangYong. Kaiser on.

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from remotecar http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/caranddriver/blog/~3/p5JSC3i_tm0/


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via WordPress https://robertvasquez123.wordpress.com/2016/02/03/the-chairman-kaiser-itll-surprise-yer-ssangyong-gets-dubious-with-names/
The Chairman Kaiser! It’ll Surprise Yer! SsangYong Gets Dubious with Names

External image

-

While Volkswagen has done an admirable job of keeping W.O. Bentley’s name at the forefront of the ultra-luxe brand he founded, and the Charles Rolls/Henry Royce duo looms large in the minds of gearheads with sybaritic tendencies, your average layman gives not two whits about the men behind the names; the brand is all. So when South Korean automaker SsangYong needed a name for the next generation of their Chairman executive sedan, they went straight for pre-Weimar Germany and appropriated the name of the kaiser!

-

Regrettably, they did not name the new machine the Chairman Wilhelm II. Then again, given the man’s role in a conflagration that consumed Europe and the Middle East, perhaps that was a smart business decision. Instead, they simply called the thing the Chairman Kaiser, which to American ears, anyway, sounds like more of a tribute to American industrialist and health-insurance pioneer Henry J. Kaiser.

-

For a brief period, Kaiser’s name adorned a line of automobiles. Upon Kaiser Motors’ merger with Willys-Overland, the company quickly went in all in on the line of utes derived from the Willys Jeep, ultimately renaming the company Kaiser Jeep in 1963. The Kaiser Jeep brand lasted only until 1970, when AMC absorbed the four-wheelin’ marque.

-

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- The Kaiser will be a zootier version of this, the Ssangyong Chairman W. -

But the SsangYong Kaiser apparently has nothing to do with Jeep at all, aside from the fact that the Grand Cherokee shares underpinnings with Mercedes utes and the Chairman Kaiser utilizes Benz powertrain components, including a 300-hp 5.0-liter V-8 as the top-line engine choice. Wards Auto quotes a SsangYong spokesman thusly: “In German it means emperor, higher than a king. And like the name ‘Chairman,’ it means dignity. It is a vehicle for people who care and have dignity. It’s a good name.”

-
- -
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Would it be churlish to point out that Wilhelm II, the last of the kaisers, died in exile, responsible for the destruction of a continent and the death of a generation of young men, having left the ground open for the rise of one of the most malevolent totalitarian regimes ever to know power? Yes? Okay then, SsangYong. Kaiser on.

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from Car and Driver Blog http://ift.tt/1RYLFAC


from Blogger http://ift.tt/1QZcCDb
The Chairman Kaiser! It’ll Surprise Yer! SsangYong Gets Dubious with Names

http://bit.ly/1PetMYN
-While Volkswagen has done an admirable job of keeping W.O. Bentley’s name at the forefront of the ultra-luxe brand he founded, and the Charles Rolls/Henry Royce duo looms large in the minds of gearheads with sybaritic tendencies, your average layman gives not two whits about the men behind the names; the brand is all. So when South Korean automaker SsangYong needed a name for the next generation of their Chairman executive sedan, they went straight for pre-Weimar Germany and appropriated the name of the kaiser!-Regrettably, they did not name the new machine the Chairman Wilhelm II. Then again, given the man’s role in a conflagration that consumed Europe and the Middle East, perhaps that was a smart business decision. Instead, they simply called the thing the Chairman Kaiser, which to American ears, anyway, sounds like more of a tribute to American industrialist and health-insurance pioneer Henry J. Kaiser.-For a brief period, Kaiser’s name adorned a line of automobiles. Upon Ka

The Chairman Kaiser! It’ll Surprise Yer! SsangYong Gets Dubious with Names

External image

While Volkswagen has done an admirable job of keeping W.O. Bentley’s name at the forefront of the ultra-luxe brand he founded, and the Charles Rolls/Henry Royce duo looms large in the minds of gearheads with sybaritic tendencies, your average layman gives not two whits about the men behind the names; the brand is all. So when South Korean automaker SsangYong needed a name for the next generation of their Chairman executive sedan, they went straight for pre-Weimar Germany and appropriated the name of the kaiser!

Regrettably, they did not name the new machine the Chairman Wilhelm II. Then again, given the man’s role in a conflagration that consumed Europe and the Middle East, perhaps that was a smart business decision. Instead, they simply called the thing the Chairman Kaiser, which to American ears, anyway, sounds like more of a tribute to American industrialist and health-insurance pioneer Henry J. Kaiser.

For a brief period, Kaiser’s name adorned a line of automobiles. Upon Kaiser Motors’ merger with Willys-Overland, the company quickly went in all in on the line of utes derived from the Willys Jeep, ultimately renaming the company Kaiser Jeep in 1963. The Kaiser Jeep brand lasted only until 1970, when AMC absorbed the four-wheelin’ marque.

External image

The Kaiser will be a zootier version of this, the Ssangyong Chairman W.

But the SsangYong Kaiser apparently has nothing to do with Jeep at all, aside from the fact that the Grand Cherokee shares underpinnings with Mercedes utes and the Chairman Kaiser utilizes Benz powertrain components, including a 300-hp 5.0-liter V-8 as the top-line engine choice. Wards Auto quotes a SsangYong spokesman thusly: “In German it means emperor, higher than a king. And like the name ‘Chairman,’ it means dignity. It is a vehicle for people who care and have dignity. It’s a good name.”





Would it be churlish to point out that Wilhelm II, the last of the kaisers, died in exile, responsible for the destruction of a continent and the death of a generation of young men, having left the ground open for the rise of one of the most malevolent totalitarian regimes ever to know power? Yes? Okay then, SsangYong. Kaiser on.


from Car and Driver Blog http://blog.caranddriver.com/the-chairman-kaiser-itll-surprise-yer-ssangyong-gets-dubious-with-names/


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External image
The Chairman Kaiser! It’ll Surprise Yer! SsangYong Gets Dubious with Names

External image

-

While Volkswagen has done an admirable job of keeping W.O. Bentley’s name at the forefront of the ultra-luxe brand he founded, and the Charles Rolls/Henry Royce duo looms large in the minds of gearheads with sybaritic tendencies, your average layman gives not two whits about the men behind the names; the brand is all. So when South Korean automaker SsangYong needed a name for the next generation of their Chairman executive sedan, they went straight for pre-Weimar Germany and appropriated the name of the kaiser!

-

Regrettably, they did not name the new machine the Chairman Wilhelm II. Then again, given the man’s role in a conflagration that consumed Europe and the Middle East, perhaps that was a smart business decision. Instead, they simply called the thing the Chairman Kaiser, which to American ears, anyway, sounds like more of a tribute to American industrialist and health-insurance pioneer Henry J. Kaiser.

-

For a brief period, Kaiser’s name adorned a line of automobiles. Upon Kaiser Motors’ merger with Willys-Overland, the company quickly went in all in on the line of utes derived from the Willys Jeep, ultimately renaming the company Kaiser Jeep in 1963. The Kaiser Jeep brand lasted only until 1970, when AMC absorbed the four-wheelin’ marque.

-

External image

-The Kaiser will be a zootier version of this, the Ssangyong Chairman W.-

But the SsangYong Kaiser apparently has nothing to do with Jeep at all, aside from the fact that the Grand Cherokee shares underpinnings with Mercedes utes and the Chairman Kaiser utilizes Benz powertrain components, including a 300-hp 5.0-liter V-8 as the top-line engine choice. Wards Auto quotes a SsangYong spokesman thusly: “In German it means emperor, higher than a king. And like the name ‘Chairman,’ it means dignity. It is a vehicle for people who care and have dignity. It’s a good name.”

-
--
-

Would it be churlish to point out that Wilhelm II, the last of the kaisers, died in exile, responsible for the destruction of a continent and the death of a generation of young men, having left the ground open for the rise of one of the most malevolent totalitarian regimes ever to know power? Yes? Okay then, SsangYong. Kaiser on.

-
External image
The Chairman Kaiser! It’ll Surprise Yer! SsangYong Gets Dubious with Names

External image

-

While Volkswagen has done an admirable job of keeping W.O. Bentley’s name at the forefront of the ultra-luxe brand he founded, and the Charles Rolls/Henry Royce duo looms large in the minds of gearheads with sybaritic tendencies, your average layman gives not two whits about the men behind the names; the brand is all. So when South Korean automaker SsangYong needed a name for the next generation of their Chairman executive sedan, they went straight for pre-Weimar Germany and appropriated the name of the kaiser!

-

Regrettably, they did not name the new machine the Chairman Wilhelm II. Then again, given the man’s role in a conflagration that consumed Europe and the Middle East, perhaps that was a smart business decision. Instead, they simply called the thing the Chairman Kaiser, which to American ears, anyway, sounds like more of a tribute to American industrialist and health-insurance pioneer Henry J. Kaiser.

-

For a brief period, Kaiser’s name adorned a line of automobiles. Upon Kaiser Motors’ merger with Willys-Overland, the company quickly went in all in on the line of utes derived from the Willys Jeep, ultimately renaming the company Kaiser Jeep in 1963. The Kaiser Jeep brand lasted only until 1970, when AMC absorbed the four-wheelin’ marque.

-

External image

-The Kaiser will be a zootier version of this, the Ssangyong Chairman W.-

But the SsangYong Kaiser apparently has nothing to do with Jeep at all, aside from the fact that the Grand Cherokee shares underpinnings with Mercedes utes and the Chairman Kaiser utilizes Benz powertrain components, including a 300-hp 5.0-liter V-8 as the top-line engine choice. Wards Auto quotes a SsangYong spokesman thusly: “In German it means emperor, higher than a king. And like the name ‘Chairman,’ it means dignity. It is a vehicle for people who care and have dignity. It’s a good name.”

-
--
-

Would it be churlish to point out that Wilhelm II, the last of the kaisers, died in exile, responsible for the destruction of a continent and the death of a generation of young men, having left the ground open for the rise of one of the most malevolent totalitarian regimes ever to know power? Yes? Okay then, SsangYong. Kaiser on.

-
External image
The Chairman Kaiser! It’ll Surprise Yer! SsangYong Gets Dubious with Names

External image

-

While Volkswagen has done an admirable job of keeping W.O. Bentley’s name at the forefront of the ultra-luxe brand he founded, and the Charles Rolls/Henry Royce duo looms large in the minds of gearheads with sybaritic tendencies, your average layman gives not two whits about the men behind the names; the brand is all. So when South Korean automaker SsangYong needed a name for the next generation of their Chairman executive sedan, they went straight for pre-Weimar Germany and appropriated the name of the kaiser!

-

Regrettably, they did not name the new machine the Chairman Wilhelm II. Then again, given the man’s role in a conflagration that consumed Europe and the Middle East, perhaps that was a smart business decision. Instead, they simply called the thing the Chairman Kaiser, which to American ears, anyway, sounds like more of a tribute to American industrialist and health-insurance pioneer Henry J. Kaiser.

-

For a brief period, Kaiser’s name adorned a line of automobiles. Upon Kaiser Motors’ merger with Willys-Overland, the company quickly went in all in on the line of utes derived from the Willys Jeep, ultimately renaming the company Kaiser Jeep in 1963. The Kaiser Jeep brand lasted only until 1970, when AMC absorbed the four-wheelin’ marque.

-

External image

-The Kaiser will be a zootier version of this, the Ssangyong Chairman W.-

But the SsangYong Kaiser apparently has nothing to do with Jeep at all, aside from the fact that the Grand Cherokee shares underpinnings with Mercedes utes and the Chairman Kaiser utilizes Benz powertrain components, including a 300-hp 5.0-liter V-8 as the top-line engine choice. Wards Auto quotes a SsangYong spokesman thusly: “In German it means emperor, higher than a king. And like the name ‘Chairman,’ it means dignity. It is a vehicle for people who care and have dignity. It’s a good name.”

-
--
-

Would it be churlish to point out that Wilhelm II, the last of the kaisers, died in exile, responsible for the destruction of a continent and the death of a generation of young men, having left the ground open for the rise of one of the most malevolent totalitarian regimes ever to know power? Yes? Okay then, SsangYong. Kaiser on.

-
from Car and Driver Blog http://blog.caranddriver.com/the-chairman-kaiser-itll-surprise-yer-ssangyong-gets-dubious-with-names/
The Chairman Kaiser! It’ll Surprise Yer! SsangYong Gets Dubious with Names

External image

-

While Volkswagen has done an admirable job of keeping W.O. Bentley’s name at the forefront of the ultra-luxe brand he founded, and the Charles Rolls/Henry Royce duo looms large in the minds of gearheads with sybaritic tendencies, your average layman gives not two whits about the men behind the names; the brand is all. So when South Korean automaker SsangYong needed a name for the next generation of their Chairman executive sedan, they went straight for pre-Weimar Germany and appropriated the name of the kaiser!

-

Regrettably, they did not name the new machine the Chairman Wilhelm II. Then again, given the man’s role in a conflagration that consumed Europe and the Middle East, perhaps that was a smart business decision. Instead, they simply called the thing the Chairman Kaiser, which to American ears, anyway, sounds like more of a tribute to American industrialist and health-insurance pioneer Henry J. Kaiser.

-

For a brief period, Kaiser’s name adorned a line of automobiles. Upon Kaiser Motors’ merger with Willys-Overland, the company quickly went in all in on the line of utes derived from the Willys Jeep, ultimately renaming the company Kaiser Jeep in 1963. The Kaiser Jeep brand lasted only until 1970, when AMC absorbed the four-wheelin’ marque.

-

External image

-The Kaiser will be a zootier version of this, the Ssangyong Chairman W.-

But the SsangYong Kaiser apparently has nothing to do with Jeep at all, aside from the fact that the Grand Cherokee shares underpinnings with Mercedes utes and the Chairman Kaiser utilizes Benz powertrain components, including a 300-hp 5.0-liter V-8 as the top-line engine choice. Wards Auto quotes a SsangYong spokesman thusly: “In German it means emperor, higher than a king. And like the name ‘Chairman,’ it means dignity. It is a vehicle for people who care and have dignity. It’s a good name.”

-
--
-

Would it be churlish to point out that Wilhelm II, the last of the kaisers, died in exile, responsible for the destruction of a continent and the death of a generation of young men, having left the ground open for the rise of one of the most malevolent totalitarian regimes ever to know power? Yes? Okay then, SsangYong. Kaiser on.

-
from Car and Driver Blog http://blog.caranddriver.com/the-chairman-kaiser-itll-surprise-yer-ssangyong-gets-dubious-with-names/
3

Otto Dix images. 

I often forget that these aren’t just gruesome thoughts, illustrative drawings that would appear in Juxtapoze ironically. Not that I have a problem with drawing things without a primary experience, but I can hardly imagine the types of emotions one would feel, living in Weimar Germany–or any other War ravaged nation–in the wake of WW1, surrounded by so much death. 

https://vimeo.com/140562374

Not sure it’s related, but this video surprised me recently, too. At first I thought it was an illustration of violence without any grounding. Then, I thought about all the bodies decomposing at the bottoms of lakes or unknown places. Maybe it’s cause I’ve been listening to the Manson series on You Must Remember This. Anyway, it started to make me feel sad and human. Good animation too. That shoe on the ground really gets me. 

gondorsfinest asked:

the cupcakes are so cool looking! where did you get them? :D

Hi! :D We got them in a Cupcakeria in Weimar (Germany). It was possible to decide which theme and which taste it should get and we bought them relatively advantageously priced. :)

Weimar, Germany. Weimar is considered the “cultural belly button” of Germany. It was also destroyed after WW2 but a ton of money got dumped into rebuilding the town. It looks incredible!!

BAUHAUS

Walter Gropius was the originator of the Bauhaus movement, firstly immerging in 1919 in Weimar, Germany. The Bauhaus modernist art school was the most instrumental of the 20th century, its perceptions on art and design in connection to technology and the society had had a great impact on both the United States and Europe, even after the school had closed its doors. The Bauhaus was developed through trends such as the Arts and Crafts movement (19th and beginning of 20th Century), Gropius vision was to combine sculpture, painting and architecture into a singular expression of creativity. Furthermore, Gropius had successfully developed a syllabus that would equip designers and artists with the skills to develop useful and ecstatically striking objects appropriate for that new born system of living.  The course had attracted numerous students who came from varied and diverse social and educational backgrounds, with courses being taught by visual artists. Some of these artists were Paul Klee, Josef Albers and Vasily Kandinsky.

In 1925, the school had moved to Dessau, a complex designed by Walter Gropius himself, this building had come to be perceived as a breakthrough in modern, functionalist design and its features such as the steel-frame construction, asymmetrical pinwheel plan and glass curtain walls made it a hallmark to modernist architecture.

                                 Universal Typeface by Herbert Bayer, 1925

After immersing into the Bauhaus syllabus and theory, students were later required to specialize in a workshop, which included cabinetmaking, metalworking, pottery, wall painting, weaving and also typography. Initially the typography workshop wasn’t considered to be as a priority in the Bauhaus School, up until figures like Herbert Bayer and Moholy-Nagy has started to teach. Australian designer Herbert Bayer was a designer and artist who had initially attended the Bauhaus school as a student, but later took the role of teaching position once the school had moved to Dessau. Bayer is mostly known for his unique typeface design, Hitherto; a popular German typeface which was greatly inspired from medieval script yet reformed into a more classic and simple design. In aim of creating a minimalist sans-serif typeface, Bayer had designed the typeface with only lowercase letters as he believed the uppercase letters was redundant, it offered no phonetic difference. Under Herbert Bayer’s teachings, the Bauhaus conceived typography as an artistic expression whilst also as a means of commination, all expressed through visual clarity. 

In 1928 Walter Gropius dropped out from director and was replaced by famous architect, Hannes Meyer. As World War II broke out and the area became dangerous most key figures left the Bauhaus school and travelled to the United States were their works and values also ended up influencing younger generation designers and artists. Moholy-Nagy later began the New Bauhaus in Chicago in 1937. 


Bibliography

Borteh, L., 2016. Bauhaus. [Online]
Available at: http://www.theartstory.org/movement-bauhaus.htm
[Accessed 25 January 2016].

Design Is History, N.A. THE BAUHAUS. [Online]
Available at: http://www.designishistory.com/1920/the-bauhaus/
[Accessed 25 January 2016].

Winton, A. G., 2007. The Bauhaus, 1919–1933. [Online]
Available at: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/bauh/hd_bauh.htm
[Accessed 25 January 2016].