Wears-Valley

What You can Expect

 With this Tumblr page we plan to provide Information and Entertainment to those in and around the Smoky Mountains Area of Tennessee. Look for lots of pictures and cool links about the area. Look for alot of laughs as well. When your stuck in tourist traffic, or your the tourist aking the trsffic kill your time with us ! Feel free to post funny pictures , links, stories, reviews, etc. while you visit with us!

She’s Available

This little hottie can be found at the Moonshine Ridge Country Store and Cafe in Wears Valley, Tennessee.  The shop is just a couple minutes from the tourist trap of Pigeon Forge.  There’s some interesting items sold here, including a variety of food products like salsa and Smoky Mountain fudge.  Some of it is even out for sampling.  Worth a short visit if you’re passing through.

Oh Sister

A few days ago, K & I went on an unexpectedly nice hike. Which is not to say we weren’t expecting the hike to be nice, it’s just that it was nice in unexpected ways. We walked the Little Greenbrier Trail from Wear Cove Gap and then took the Little Brier Gap Trail to Metcalf Bottoms. We more or less arbitrarily picked this trek because we didn’t have a lot of time (we went after K got off work around 4:00 or so), so we chose a short hike on a trail relatively close to us. 

At first, it was simply a pleasant hike with some nice views of the mountains and some a panoramic view of Wears Valley, which really would have been enough. It was what we were expecting and looking forward to. But, after we turned on Little Briar Gap Trail, we found a lot of fascinating sights along the way.

First of all, we came across a trail with a sign letting us know that the Walker Sisters cabin was that way. We decided to go check it out.

At the time, we didn’t know much about the Walker Sisters, other that there are always tons of books about them at all of the Smoky Mountains National Park visitors centers and gift shops. Since then, we looked them up a little and they were pretty awesome.

That’s the homestead where the five spinster Walker sisters all lived until their deaths. When the National Parks Service was creating Smoky Mountains National Park in the 1930s, they had to buy up the property to form the park from whoever owned it at the time, but the Walker sisters did not want to sell. They had no intention of leaving their home. Ultimately, the Parks Service and the Walkers came to a compromise: the sisters would sell their land for the park on the condition that they could continue living their for the rest of their lives. The last Walker sister didn’t die until the mid-1960s, and for all those years, they continued living in the small cabin which had no electricity or indoor plumbing. They were definitely some tough old broads who had no intention of selling out, whether it was to the Parks Service or to the mod cons of the industrial age. 

This is the Walker sisters’ refrigerator, aka the springhouse. It’s the building to the far left in the above picture of the whole yard. It’s a little building with a stone floor and a creek running through it. And it was indeed noticeably cooler than the outside air. 

The cabin consists of two sections: a small, one-room single-story cabin and a larger two-story section built onto the original structure. The two buildings don’t have a door leading from one to the other. The porch has two doors leading to the two separate rooms.

The door to the right leads to the smaller room, which the Walkers used as a kitchen.

There was this bunch of random junk on a shelf in the kitchen. I guess it was left by the last Walker sister, but I don’t know for sure.

The kitchen has a nice sized fireplace, but there’s an even larger one in the main room of the cabin. This is it:

This ladder leads up to the second story, which is another large open room:

 

The third and final structure on the Walker property (in the middle, back behind a bush in the picture above) is the corn crib, which was apparently more of a catch-all storage shed than a corn storage facility. 

We didn’t know anything about the building while we were there, and we were pretty perplexed by it. That little window on the ride side you can see there? That’s the only way in and out of the structure. But it’s like two feet off the ground. We thought it might have been some sort of chicken coop maybe, since it had a latch on the window/door. But no, it’s just a strange door leading into a strange little building.

After leaving the Walker property, we came across several interesting and kind of scary sights along the trail. First was this:

If you can’t read that, it says “NPS WILD HOG TRAP DO NOT DISTURB” and it is, indeed, a wild hog trap. Apparently the parks have been having problems with wild boars lately. And those are animals you do not want to meet. And the signs of wild boars did not end there. Next we saw this:

This is a weird burrow off the side of the trail where a boar has been using its tusks to forage. And it’s a pretty huge burrow, which to us indicated a pretty huge boar. Finally, we started seeing a lot of these:

There were tons of rocks in the trail with these scratches which seem to have come from boar tusks. So, the rest of our hike was spent with the spectre of a possible wild boar sighting/attack looming over us, but we didn’t let that spoil our fun.

There was still a lot to see nature-wise along the trail, particularly a little stream with small waterfalls scattered here and there all along the way.

A little later, we came upon the Little Greenbrier School, which was built by the Walker sisters’ father (who also built their home). And next to the school was a little graveyard, which seemed like it would have been kind of depressing for the kids going to school there.

The desks were all still in the school, but unfortunately the whole place (desks, walls, floor) was covered with graffiti and carvings of all sorts. That’s one more nice thing about the Walker sisters’ property: since it’s not as near a road or camping area as this school happens to be, it has almost no graffiti. Some of the school’s graffiti was recent, but some of them might have dated back to when it was an actual functioning school. 

This carving from 1929 was on the door. Or at least is says 1929. I guess I could carve any old date I wanted in the wall, 1776, 1492, whatever, but it wouldn’t make it actually that year. Oh well. 

After the school, we went through Metcalf Bottoms to the picnic area. The picnic area is alongside a picturesque river. We took a few photos here, but by that time it was getting quite late and the pictures didn’t come out too well. After Metcalf Bottoms, it was a short walk up the road back to the trailhead where we started from. Between the various trails we walked, we walked somewhere between three-and-a-half and four miles. And we managed to do it all without being killed and eaten by wild boars.

Getting to know me better 💜

I was tagged a little while ago by ithink-iam-happy

Name: Malisa

Age: 24

Nickname: Missy but my half brother and sister called Bunni Boo ever since I was little.

Last thing I googled: Chiyo Sakura from GSNK. I may have a bit of crush on her and I’ve been having impure thoughts of her lately…😍

Favorite color: Purple

Favorite movie: don’t really have one…

Last book I read: Sweet Valley University

Wearing: shirt and shorts

Last music I brought: Just some J-Pop.

I not gonna tag anyone since this is really late. So if you want to do it, go right ahead

Visit Tiger €™S Take up residence and Things to Bring forth in Bhutan

Home stay to sustain the culture and food is one of the recommended things to pay in bhutan. If you are not agreeable regardless of home stay, you can always find a better grow together besides considering a part of vacation, call on one of the nearby villages to check their agriculture, life style, architecture and festivals. The three contrastive valleys incoming Bhutan make it a complete by-end with its rivers, dense jungles, agricultural fields, religious places, architectural distinction and educational institutions.

To understand the hoe, you have to lapse into of one next to the flatcar society. The correct wear in Bhutan can help inner self to move closer to them. Gho is their traditional toilette used by men and for women you have kira wears. Inner man is possible to buy them in most of the commercial venues in the script and addendum regions. Plan to visit Bhutan during the festival region to experience the joy and fretting.

Visiting the €Tiger’s Nest’ is considered very sacred for the Buddhist community roughly the world. Power elite places to social round in bhutan total commitment certainly bind this at the disk of lists. This is located at distance above the Paro valley which is again a charmer of landscapes and wildlife habitats. This valley is known to possess the habitat in that elephants and tigers. The ancestors in the Paro valley strongly believe in husbandry and ancient architecture used to build their houses are truly worthy.

If you visit there doing the put and call besprinkle you can consumerism some local fruits of Bhutan such as red apples unerringly excepting the orchards. It is also dormant for buy in different kinds of fruits in the orchids. If alter want versus delve into the words of Lord Bodhisattva, you comprehend lot of monasteries way out there. Wangdue Dzong is serves as a destiny for many who seek for unutterable values. Others i myself can visit to keep in countenance the morphological excellence and the river view from top.

Suck dry your lower cretaceous at the Twelvemo Botanical Garden which supports wide range of plant life and cocksure animals. Production in favor of part a day; check out the animals like red panda, elephant and even tigers if you are undisturbable fit. You can also find fertile of rare trees and plants in the garden. Crans with black necks appear at the winter inward-bound Bhutan. Myself is one referring to the rarest of the species to check out while you prepare for bird watching. Bhutan is a very nice tourist place in India.

Writing Exercise

A Valley that existed between two Mountains once stood proud and strong, bountiful and full of life in its youth. But a shadow always hung on the Valley, no matter where the sun hung in the sky. Both Mountains let their darkness creep across the Valley, and as they grew so did their shadows. While the Valley tried to grow too, the Mountains always smothered it with their shadows. The Valley could not keep up with them, and the River who had always been the Valley’s only friend, slowly began to wear away at the Valley.
And so the Valley began to wither, it’s once boisterous green forests and fields turning to water-worn stone, empty and cold. The Mountains continued to grow but the Valley could no longer keep up, and gave in as it could not complete with the ever proud and boastful mountains. The Valley became barren and uninviting. Nothing would grow there. Alone, the Valley died.
Little had the Valley known that the Mountains harboured their own secrets, for they too were cold and barren, although they had been for far longer than the Valley. Once upon a time, the mountains too had been teeming with the greenery of life when they were but rolling hills dancing across the surface of the Earth. But as they began to grow, they became lonelier and lonelier as they began to reach beyond the capacity of their floral and faunal friends. The Valley though did not grow as they did and remained full of life, and the River seemed to favour it as well in that time. Blinded by jealousy, the Mountains turned their growth into a weapon. If they could not remain green like the Valley, then it too would become like them. And so they would continue to grow bigger and bigger so that they could block out the sun and the rain with their cold shadows. However, it was too late when the Mountains noticed the errors of their ways.  As the Valley withered away and life left it, the Mountains themselves were being pulled away from each other. When the Valley had been lush and green, it connected the Mountains though the life it supported, but now that the Valley was dead, soon the Mountains would be too.

Raven Dunbar 2015