We All were Born with Succeed

8

Dear Bryce,

A year has passed since I first saw your precious face. Oh, how’ve you grown since that October afternoon. I still remember storming out the door and speeding down the highway to get to the hospital. So many thoughts raced through my mind that morning. How big you would be? What your hair would look like? Would you be a ladies man like your dad? I’ve never felt a combination of fear and joy like I felt that day. Why fear? Because of society. You were born during a time where race issues were beginning to resurface and I was scared that the world may not accept you.

I got to the hospital just as the sun was starting to peak over the trees. I ran inside and I could hear your mother moaning and growling like an animal in captivity! I remember going in the room and standing in the corner. I was afraid of your mother at that time. A few hours passed and it was time for you to make your mark on this earth. Your mother pushed six times and you were here.

Our sweet boy. Our soon to be King. You were here. I couldn’t believe it. I remember your mother panicking because she couldn’t hear you crying. I remember her asking frantically “why isn’t he crying. why can’t I hear him”. Then boom, that cry that we would grow to love could be heard down the halls of the hospital. I remember hugging your mothers head and kissing her on the forehead. You were a big one! I felt like there was a WWE announcer saying “WEIGHING 9 POUNDS AND 5 OUNCES WITH A HEIGHT OF 21 AND A HALF INCHES BRYYYYYYYYCEEEEEEE ANTHONYYYYYY MARRRRRTINNNNN”. Hope you said it in that announcer voice when you read that.

The first night, I was the happiest person in the world. Holding you in my arms made my heart melt. I remember you looking at me and scrunching up your eyebrows and looking like a grumpy old man. You looked as if you hated the world but then again, you were your fathers child. After a couples of nights in the hospital, the doctors determined that you were ready to go out and face the world! We couldn’t get you away from the hospital any quicker. We sped straight to sonic to get your mom some cheese tots. I know right? But you didn’t care. It was your first Halloween and you were happy as our little Frankenstein.

We were on our own now. Your mother and I were parents. There was no pause button or help desk we could call. Your presence made us change the way we look at life but it was a much needed change.

A part of me feels bad that both of your parents are photographers because you’re going to have a camera in your face for the rest of your life. But is that really a bad thing? People all over the world tell me how much they love you you’ve never even met them and may never meet them. All because of photography.

I plan to give you the universe and then some but it saddens me that you won’t be able to feel the love that my mother would have given you. She would have loved the brown right off your skin! I remember how happy she was when your cousin Christian was born. Being a grandmother was her gift and even though she’s not physically here, I know she’s looking out for you and making sure I take care of you.

All we want is to watch you succeed. I can’t protect you from the mistakes you’ll make in life but I can vow to be there to help you chart out a plan to avoid the next one. I don’t want to see you trip and fall but I know it’s the only way you’ll know what to avoid the next time.

One last thing. You were born during a very difficult time. Race is an issue right now. I wish I could explain why but I can’t. There’s a lot of black vs. white occurring. People are gonna say that you’re different because of the color of your skin. Listen to me closely Bryce, you’re not. And if you understand that, it actually gives you a one up. Skin is only skin. It doesn’t define your character. You may encounter some situations that will test your patience but just remember that some are ignorant to the fact race doesn’t matter.

You have a gift. The same gift my mother had. The same gift I have. You have a smile that can change the world. Never forget how important that gift is and never be afraid to smile during the darkest times to brighten your way.

I’ll always love you more than sharks love blood, baby boy 💙.

The Slug Club - Social Mobility in a Medieval World


The Slug Club has been controversial amongst fans due to its inherent elitist nature. Whist many people have decried that such a society shouldn’t exist in the school because it’s “not fair”. 

Other essay writers like Redhen proposed that there has always been some kind of “Slug Club” and Slughorn is just the last in a long line of connection brokers in a world that is reliant on connections and patronage

I have a different theory regarding the Slug Club. I explain:


  • Why Slughorn is a brave innovator who introduced a brand new concept to the wizarding world: social mobility for muggle-borns 
  • How the Slug Club works to better wizarding society
  • Why Slughorn set up the Club in the first place - most likely in response to the Dark Lord that preceded Voldemort. 
  • Why, despite Slughorn’s best intentions, his actions contributed directly to the rise of Lord Voldemort - in more ways than one. 

 

An Ancient Society Built on Patronage 



The Harry Potter’s world may look familiar because the books are primarily set in a school, but the wizarding world is not modern Britain with magic, it is a completely different society that has developed on its own independent trajectory for nearly 400 years. The organisation of the wizarding world bears very little resemblance to a modern developed country. In fact it more closely resembles a pre-industrial Britain of the 17th century both in demographics and in prevailing societal attitudes. (See – An Endangered Species Essay)

The Slug Club is inherently not fair, because the Wizarding World is not fair. In fact the wizarding world does not have the concept of “fairness” as understood by anyone living in a modern developed country. Discrimination is openly accepted on all levels and is considered a natural part of life. Never have the words “equal opportunities” or “social mobility” ever been utter by any wizards/witches because these concepts simply do not exist on a cultural/societal level. On an individual level students at Hogwarts are taught about interpersonal virtues of respect, honour and fairness but there is no concerted effort to make the entire society fair for everyone.

In modern Britain politicians promote the virtues of a meritocracy above all else and discrimination is seen as something that should be stamped out. In the job market, employers bend over backwards to look like they give the same opportunities for all. Judges, politicians, and other figures of authority have to publically announce their conflicts of interests (basically anything that affects their neutrality in decision making). Of course nepotism, corruption and prejudice are still endemic to modern British society and growing in strength under the current government but the prevailing social attitude is that these things are definitely wrong.  Never do we see such modern British values being spoken of in the wider Wizarding World. In the Wizarding World one’s connections account for far more than one’s abilities and this is widely accepted as perfectly decent and normal. 

The idea that some family lineages are superior to others is another relic of our collective medieval past that the Wizarding World still endorses to this day. Up until the 20th century, muggle society believed that aristocrats were inherently superior by virtue of better breeding to the working classes. In modern Britain, outwardly at least, we all believe that everyone regardless of their birth has the same potential and deserves the same opportunities to succeed. However this equal opportunities concept to be absent in the Wizarding World as whole.

Keep reading

Forsaken Epilogue
Connor Kenway/Ratonhnhaké:ton
Forsaken Epilogue

Mother. Father. I am sorry. I have failed you both. I made a promise to protect our people. I thought…I thought if I could stop the Templars, if I could keep the revolution free from their influence, that those I supported would do what was right. They did, I suppose, do what was right—what was right for them.

As for you, Father, I thought I might unite us, that we would forget the past and forge a better future. In time, I believed you could be made to see the world as I did—to understand. But it was just a dream. This, too, I should have known.

Were we not meant to live in peace, then? Is that it? Are we born to argue? To fight? So many voices—each demanding something else.

It has been hard at times, but never harder than today. To see all I worked for perverted, discarded, forgotten. You would say I have described the whole of history, Father.

Are you smiling, then? Hoping I might speak the words you longed to hear? To validate you? To say that all along you were right? I will not. Even now, faced as I am with the truth of your cold words, I refuse. Because I believe things can still change. I may never succeed. The Assassins may struggle another thousand years in vain. But we will not stop.

Compromise. That’s what everyone has insisted upon. And so I have learnt it. But differently than most, I think. I realize now that it will take time, that the road ahead is long and shrouded in darkness. It is a road that will not always take me where I wish to go—and I doubt I will live to see its end.

But I will travel down it nonetheless. For at my side walks hope. In the fact of all that insists I turn back, I carry on: this, this is my compromise.

Passage found in the Forsaken epilogue.

ROSE ARABELLA GRANGER-WEASLEY

Aged 24, Gryffindor alum. Daughter of Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger. Halfblood. Incredibly smart, incredibly beautiful, incredibly amazing Auror (get out, Al).

The oldest child of Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger had always been told two things: 1) always be the best and 2) we love you very much. Born to succeed, Rose Granger-Weasley had always strived to know everything and come out on top - all the while helping others, of course. Her first four years at Hogwarts, where she was sorted into Gryffindor, were the first true test of this determination. And she passed, more or less unscathed. Thereafter, Rose was appointed prefect in her fifth year and Head Girl in her seventh year, alongside none other than Scorpius Malfoy. But at that point, her, Scor, and Al had become an inseparable trio, and she actually found that Scorpius was the ideal partner if you ever wanted to get anything done. Now, at age 24, Rose is an Auror alongside her cousins Albus and Teddy, and only making more of an impact in the Ministry of Magic every single day.

oceanfoxxx  asked:

Thank you for being one of the few adults I know who doesn't shit on my generation...

Are you kidding me?! You kids are fucking incredible! You put up with so much bullshit from people my age and older and you thrive and survive by relying on each other and holy shit, my friend, you do not understand how amazing it is to see the glory of a generation growing up with constant access to information and with the ability to just …learn … whatever the hell you want to learn, even (and especially) when it’s things like “I’m different from everyone I know in X and Y ways and I don’t know why, please help?” and you get information and support and holy shit you guys care about each other in ways that I never had growing up. With that technology and access though, you also have the horrid reality of the bullying at school following you home and everywhere and I can’t even imagine what that must be like. But you know, and you reach out for help and to help and that’s astounding.

My ex-wife and I had a philosophy when it came to raising our daughters. We have always tried to “Create an environment of Satisfied Curiosity.” My poor dad had to hear “But, how?” and “But, why?” with no access to any of the tools I’ve had to do that, and in fairness, when our older daughter was born in 2001, I didn’t quite have what’s available now, but we never wanted to tell our kids to stop asking questions. Turns out we weren’t alone. 

Your generation asks the questions. All the time. And you expect answers. You take us to task for the shit we’ve done and that we haven’t done. And you challenge us to do better. To be better. And you expect better. 

My generation and our parents fed you the same lies we were fed - get your education, go to work, work hard and you’ll succeed and your success is measured (and ONLY measured) in how much you make your life look like ours - buy these things, do these things, live this life, and you’ll be happy. You’re calling us on the bullshit because we did all these things and you can see that it did not make us happy. Y’all seek love and community and when you build, you build networks and lean on each other and strengthen each other. 

And hey, listen. I’m not wearing rose-colored glasses. There’s plenty of you that are living in terrible situations and don’t have access to all the things, or understand that they aren’t alone and isolated. But I see you all reaching out to them too. What a blessing!

There’s plenty of you that are entitled little shits, too, but I see the rest of you calling them on their bullshit and showing each other how maybe their experience with privilege is not in fact universal, and I see people learning and changing. Holy shit, the number of times I’ve had serious conversations and disagreements and then got my head out of my ass to learn a thing, only to realize the person I’ve been talking to is 14 or 16 or 18 … I COULD NEVER HAVE DONE THAT AT THAT AGE. Seriously. I could never have articulated the things I hear from you kids all the time. 

You are all so strong, and so brave and so determined. I am glad that my daughters have y’all as peers. I’m proud of all of you. 

2

This was last week, at the Metropolitan Championship race. This took place at Van Cortlandt park and I ran an 18:48 for the 5k course and placed sixth in the race. Lots of hills, lots of pain, lots of reasons to want to give up, but I have worked far too hard and trained far too much to ever let doubt come into the plans I have set for myself.

Today we ran the course at Lafayette College, a 6k course with many hills that I did not anticipate. I ran a 22:58 and placed first in the race.

I am not one who likes to talk about my stats. I don’t like to openly talk about how I do unless directly asked or questioned about my performances and PRs, etc, but on here I like to document my journey, my progress, and I love sharing my stories with you all because I love hearing all of your successes as well.

Running has changed my life. It has also brought me to some of the most amazing people and memories I could have ever asked for.

I was hurting so bad in the race today, but I got on that line right before the gun went off and said to myself, “I am going to win this race today.” Don’t ask me why I decided this for myself, I just wanted it so bad.

There is no better feeling than coming down that straightaway finish knowing you did everything you could have possibly done, giving every bit of effort from your body and your soul, and seeing the time on that clock that you wanted, all the pain you felt during that race suddenly disappears, because you realize it was worth every minute.

There are so many excuses and reasons we can tell ourselves we will fail, but it is up to us to tell ourselves why we were born and made to succeed. You train to run. Run this race because you LOVE to do it. Run because you CAN. You are capable, you have working legs, a healthy heart, a strong mind, an incredible body made to carry you through obstacles.

Running is so much more than just moving along with two legs. It is a way of life. It is the amazing feeling of soreness and hunger after you accomplished a goal. It is seeing your times decrease because of the choice to wake up every morning and train. It is seeing your teammates happy, seeing your coach smile, treating your body and soul with the utmost respect. It is doing the things you have to do, even when you may not feel like always doing them.

My father left those for me.

Mother, Father, I am sorry. I have failed you both.

I made a promise to protect our people. I thought…I thought if I could stop the Templars—if I could keep the Revolution free from their influence—that those I supported would do what was right.

They did—I suppose—do what was right…

What was right for them.

As for you, Father: I thought I might unite us, that we would forget the past and forge a better future.

In time I believed you could be made to see the world as I did; to understand…but it was just a dream. This too, I should have known.

Were we not meant to live in peace, then? Is that it?

Are we born to argue? To fight?

So many voices, each demanding something else… It has been hard at times, but never harder than today to see all I worked for; perverted, discarded, forgotten!

You would say I have described the whole of history, Father. Are you smiling, then? Hoping I might speak the words you long to hear? To validate you? To say that all along, you were right?

I will not.

Even now, faced as I am with the truth of your cold words, I refuse, because I believe things can still change. I may never succeed—the Assassin’s may struggle another thousand years in vain—but we will not stop!

Compromise. That is what everyone has insisted upon. And so I have learned it. But differently than most, I think…

I realize now that it will take time; that the road ahead is long, and shrouded in darkness. It is a road that will not always take me where I wish to go, and I doubt I will live to see its end. But I will travel down it nonetheless.

For at my side walks hope. In the face of all that insists I turn back, I carry on. This…

This is my compromise.

—  -Ratonhnhaké:ton/Connor - Assassin’s Creed: Forsaken