Warrior-Games

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Technically, the first fighting game I played was the Genesis version of Super Street Fighter II at a babysitter’s house. I don’t remember much of it, though.

So, I consider the PS1 port of Marvel vs. Capcom 1 (courtesy of my old friends, Matt and Tim) to be my true debut fighting game experience. I was floored by how cool it all was.

Here are some combos so you can see for yourself. ^_^

~R

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On February 6, 1991, Capcom premiered its sequel its 1987 game Street Fighter dubbed Street Fighter II: The World Warrior. The game was a success and helped pave the way for many elements that standards in the fighting game genre.

Happy 25th Anniversary Street Fighter II!!

Hey guys! 

I run a page called Project World Warrior on Facebook and this is one of our gifs. It would be lovely if you guys would like the page. We cover all fighting games not just Street Fighter. 

https://www.facebook.com/ProjectWorldWarrior/

Also look out for my Youtube channel coming this week, much love. 

anonymous asked:

Hey man! I love the work you put into your character analysis, their a great read. I was wondering if you had a favorite Dynasty Warriors game and if you had an opinion on which had the best music (or OST). Any thoughts to the question?

First: Thank you!

My favorite DW game is DW4. It was the most unique game by far, the one that tried out the most new ideas, and I feel like most of those ideas were really well implemented. Duels, branching stories, hidden stages, custom officers (in the story, no less!), variable outcomes, stories for the Other factions, custom bodyguard units… Most of these things didn’t appear at all in subsequent games, or did so in an extremely reduced capacity.

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Stephen “Turbo” Toboz, Jr., first joined the Navy in ’91 after drifting through a couple of colleges and being inspired to seek a new start after reading Richard Marcinko’s memoirs, Rogue Warrior. After becoming an operator of SEAL Team Six himself and later being maimed on the battlefield, he continued to demonstrates his dedication and desire.

Toboz lost three liters of blood and his left lower leg when his team was ambushed on a lonely mountaintop 10,000 feet above sea level in Afghanistan. Despite bullet-shattered bones in his leg and foot, Turbo managed to destroy a machine gun position, rescue a fallen team mate and continue his mission, withdrawing only under orders from his team leader.

He refused morphine so that he could maintain an alert security posture. Unable to stand and under constant assault by gunfire, rockets and grenades, Turbo ex-filtrated by crawling a mile on frostbitten hands and feet, engaging the enemy constantly until his team was secured and evacuated.

Toboz was awarded a Silver Star & Purple Heart for refusing to give in despite his life-threatening injuries. He continued to serve as an inspiration long after that fateful day.

Following multiple surgeries to his lower leg, Turbo ordered the doctors to amputate and fit him with a prosthetic leg. Like Delta operator Brad Halling before him, Toboz returned to active duty, redeploying to Afghanistan nine months later.

However, unsatisfied with operating at 95 percent, Toboz changed paths and instead passed his wisdom downrange: he became an instructor for the U.S. Navy SEAL Sniper Course.

Interview between PO1 Toboz & Julie Brennan:

The word “turbo” conjures up images of high-speed, high-powered, full-force, super-charged devices.

It’s the perfect nickname for Lock Haven native Stephen Toboz, Jr., a retired Navy SEAL who’s still very active with the United States Navy and its elite, special forces. He’s a high-energy guy who is living life to the fullest, each and every day. (Read More

Speakers in awe of Community pride of veterans, those on active duty

Part I of Turbo’s Speech & Part II of Turbo’s Speech

Foundations:

Navy SEAL Foundation & Wounded Warrior Project

Don’t get in their way.

Jasmine Perry, Chasity Kuczer and Laurel Cox compete in the first women’s archery category in Warrior Games history during the Army Trials on Fort Bliss in El Paso, Texas, March 31, 2015. The event determines who competes in the Department of Defense Warrior Games 2015 in June.