Veterans Day

“I’ve seen a ton on the facebooks about "thanking veterans for their service.” As a veteran let me just be very straightforward and honest with you. We didn’t “serve our country”; we don’t actually serve our brothers/sisters or our neighbors. We serve the interests of Capital. We never risked our lives or spent months on deployment away from our family and friends so they can have this abstract concept called “freedom”. We served big oil; big coal; Coca-Cola; Kellogg, Brown, and Root and all the other big Capital interests who don’t know a fucking thing about sacrifice. These people will never have to deal with the loss of a loved one or the physical and/or psychological scars that those who “serve”, and their families, have to deal with for the rest of their lives. The most patriotic thing someone can do is to tell truth to power and dedicate yourself to building power to overthrow these sociopathic assholes. I served with some of the most real and genuine people I’ve ever met. You’ll never see solidarity like the kind of solidarity you experience when your life depends on the person next to you. But most of us didn’t join for that; we joined because we were fucking poor and didn’t have many other options.“

— An anti-capitalist veteran

Happy Veteran’s Day, Tumblr. 

This is a thank you to everyone who has served, or is currently serving in the armed forces. Today, let’s take time to educate ourselves and acknowledge the mental health issues that millions of veterans face each and every day.

If you want to share your experience as a veteran or your support for others, share it and tag it #postitforward. And if you want to express it visually, you can submit it to Tumblr’s Mental Health Quilt (@mentalhealthquilt).

<3

This November 11...

Shoutout to the a-spec soldiers.

Shoutout to the gay soldiers.

Shoutout to the lesbian soldiers.

Shoutout to the trans soldiers.

Shoutout to bi soldiers.

Shoutout to nonbinary soldiers.

And to the pansexual soldiers.

Shoutout to any and all LGBTQ+ troops.

💜❤💛💚💙

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Once a Year at 11:11 am the Sun Shines Perfectly on this Memorial

At precisely 11:11 a.m. each Veterans Day (Nov. 11), the sun’s rays pass through the ellipses of the five Armed Services pillars to form a perfect solar spotlight over a mosaic of The Great Seal of the United States.

The Anthem Veterans Memorial, located in Anthem, Arizona, is a monument dedicated to honoring the service and sacrifice of the United States armed forces. The pillar provides a place of honor and reflection for veterans, their family and friends, and those who want to show their respects to those service men and women who have and continue to courageously serve the United States.

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Remembering Veterans on Instagram

For more photos and videos from ceremonies around the world, visit the #veteransday and #remembranceday hashtags.

In many countries, November 11 is set aside as a day for remembering and honoring those who have dedicated their lives to military service for their country. The date stems from the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918—the end of World War I.

In the United States, November 11th marks Veterans Day, a federal holiday. Declared as an observance by President Woodrow Wilson at the end of in 1919, it was officially expanded in 1954 to honor all servicemembers. Ceremonies take place across the country, and President Obama led the ceremony at Arlington National Ceremony honoring all veterans, including the oldest known surviving veteran of WWII.

In the UK and other Commonwealth countries, the day is known as Remembrance Day. Every year, thousands of Britons wear red lapel poppies as a symbol of remembrance of the fallen, and to raise money for the families of servicemen. The poppies, immortalized in John McCrae’s poem, “In Flanders Fields,” stand as a symbol for the poppy fields that grew out of the Belgian battlefields where many soldiers fell. Wreathes of poppies are also lain at the foot of The Cenotaph war memorial in Whitehall, London, as well as at ceremonies throughout other countries. A two-minute silence is observed on both Remembrance Sunday and November 11th at 11am.

Armistice Day

Armistice Day is commemorated every year on November 11 to mark the armistice signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front of World War I, which took effect at eleven o'clock in the morning — the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918. The date was declared a national holiday in many allied nations, and coincides with Remembrance Day and Veterans Day.