Venezuelan flag

Clashes in Venezuela ahead of Sunday’s election

Rock-throwing Venezuelans braved tear gas and rainstorms on Friday, blocking streets in protest against a legislative superbody to be elected on Sunday that critics call an attempt by President Nicolas Maduro to create a dictatorship.

The election of a constituent assembly has been broadly condemned by countries around the world as a weakening of democracy in a country whose economy has been crippled by recession despite its vast oil resources.

Opposition demonstrators said urgency was increasing as they set up barricades along main roads in the capital, Caracas, pelted by sheets of rain and teargas canisters fired by police.

“If this election happens on Sunday, we lose everything. We lose Venezuela,” said a 23-year-old-woman who identified herself as a student, face covered against the gas, declining to give her name.

Confrontations with security forces, which have left more than 110 dead over the last four months, were modest on Friday as protesters and police were doused by tropical downpours.

The government banned protests from Friday to Tuesday but opposition figure Henrique Capriles called on followers to block streets again on Saturday and to hold protests along the country’s main roads on Sunday.

Venezuelans have been protesting against Maduro to demand he respect the opposition-led Congress and resolve chronic food and medicine shortages that have fueled malnutrition and health problems. (Reuters)

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An anti-government activist is arrested during clashes in Caracas on July 28, 2017. (Photo: Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

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Anti-government activists clash with riot police during a protest in Caracas on July 28, 2017. (Photo: Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

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A protester shoots a firework from a pipe at the national guard members during clashes in Caracas, Venezuela on July 28, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Becerra/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

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A wounded protester receives treatment by paramedics during clashes in Caracas, Venezuela on July 28, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Becerra/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

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A member of the national guard fires his shotgun at protesters during clashes in Caracas, Venezuela on July 28, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Becerra/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

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Protesters take cover behind home made shields and throw fireworks at the national guard members during clashes in Caracas, Venezuela on July 28, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Becerra/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

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A demonstrator is detained at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 27, 2017. (Photo: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)

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A man receives help after being injured with rubber bullets at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 27, 2017. (Photo: Marco Bello/Reuters)

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A man plays a violin at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 27, 2017. (Photo: Marco Bello/Reuters)

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An anti-government activist is grabbed by a member of the National Guard during clashes in Caracas on July 27, 2017 on the second day of a 48-hour general strike called by the opposition. (Photo: Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images)

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A man with a Venezuelan flag stands in front of riot security forces while rallying against Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)

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A demonstrator throws a tear gas canister at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)

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Demonstrators take cover at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Andres Martinez Casares/Reuters)

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Riot security forces pass through a roadblock during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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A demonstrator receives help at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)

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A demonstrator is detained at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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A demonstrator falls down while running away at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)

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An opposition demonstrator wearing a mask takes part in an anti-government protest in Caracas, on July 26, 2017. (Photo: Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

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Demonstrators clash with riot security forces at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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An injured man receives help at a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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Anti-government protesters run from advancing Venezuelan Bolivarian National Guard officers on the first day of a 48-hour general strike in protest of government plans to rewrite the constitution, in Caracas, Venezuela, Wednesday, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Ariana Cubillos/AP)

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A demonstrator prepares petrol bombs during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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A opposition demonstrator uses a sligshot to clash with police during an anti-government protest in Caracas, on July 26, 2017. (Photo: Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

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Demonstrators prepare a petrol bomb at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela July 26, 2017. (Photo: Marco Bello/Reuters)

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Demonstrators use a tire on fire to block a street at a rally during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Andres Martinez Casares/Reutes)

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Demonstrators gather at a roadblock during a strike called to protest against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas, Venezuela, July 26, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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3

In Venezuela, after the Maduro government interfered in Parliament, social mobilizations, opposite of the government, have taken on more force.

They take the streets to protest, to claim for democracy, with police forces prepared to repress. In the last two days three people have died.

These women, with the Venezuelan flag seized with force, face those who try to silence them, without fear.

They are women, they are strong, they are fearless.

(The woman in the first pic is Lilian Tintori, Leopoldo López wife. He’s been imprisoned simply for being an opponent of the government. Is a political prisoner and she has taken command of his fight for democracy).

anonymous asked:

I havent seen anybody mention the Venezuelan crisis and chaos that has been happenig and it feels like no body knows/cares but seeing your drawing with the venezuelan flag on my dash has really lifted up my spirits. Even though you didnt put a caption about Venezuela with it, the art itself shows that you do know and care about what's going on. Thank you so much.

I’m so sorry, I didn’t even think about a caption ;_; But i’m glad I could be someone to mention it. I’ve read a couple of articles on what’s been going on, and it’s been so devastating. It makes me think about how privileged I am, being able to go to school, to feel safe, and to simply have the luxury of work and food. 

I drew a child instead of an adult protester because when riots like this occur, my heart always goes out to the children first. They’re never going to forget this. These memories of tear gas, fire, blood, yelling, and chaos will probably haunt them for the rest of their lives. And my heart aches so much, because they are so young, this destruction is all they know. It’s so hard to simply read and watch about.. I could never imagine what it’s like to actually be there and live it every day. My prayers go out to Venezuela as well as the other countries in heavy turmoil, it just isn’t right.  

You know? I’ve been thinking, now that I’m slowly getting closer to the big 17k followers, I may actually launch a contest of sorts, to do something special for once, rather than the usual milestone post with the same 4 or 5 pics.

Of course, considering my situation, it won’t be anything special, as so far I have planned to send:

  • A small diecast replica of a Bf 109
  • A venezuelan shield pin
  • A venezuelan flag baseball hat
  • A TAWOG button badge, because I shill that show so much might as well
  • A small thank you hand-written letter, in both spanish and english

It all depends on how expensive it is to send, but I’ve been told it’s cheap, it just takes way too much time to leave the country, customs and such. 

What do you think?

anonymous asked:

You're white passing if you're really latina, enjoy that privilege

Behind me is the Venezuelan flag that my great-grandfather had on his fishing boat! While he was still alive, my dad spent his summers on that boat with him. When my great-grandfather died, the flag went to my grandmother. It then went to my father when my grandmother died. Now it hangs in my bedroom as a monument to where my family came from, as a reminder of their homeland. I have addressed my white-passing privilege many, many times. Always openly, and always with a clear understanding of how I benefit from it. 

But you don’t you dare ever fucking question my history like that. Don’t question if I’m “really latina”. I am, and I am proud of it. 

10

“What does the government want, a civil war?”
Interior Minister Miguel Rodriguez Torres says paratroopers will be dispatched to western border where protesters have clashed.
- Scenes of political turmoil have played out for the last couple of weeks across Venezuela as citizens protest against unemployment, a rise in violent crime and surging inflation.

1st picture
An opposition demonstrator holds a Venezuelan flag in front of a burning barricade in Caracas.
Feb15 2014

2nd picture
A demonstrator wearing a mask depicting the national flag takes part in a protest against President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas.
Feb16 2014

3rd picture
An opposition demonstrator throws a gas canister back at riot police.
Feb15 2014

4th picture
A supporter of opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez sets fire to a barricade during a protest against Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas.
Feb19 2014

5th picture
Riot police shoot tear gas as they fight against students during a protest against President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas.
Feb16 2014

6th picture
Opposition demonstrators run away from tear gas during a protest against President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Caracas.
Feb16 2014

7th picture
Members of the National Police protect themselves during an anti-government protest in Caracas.
Feb19 2014

8th picture
Protesters confront riot police during an anti-government demonstration in Caracas.
Feb19 2014

9th picture
Protesters confront riot police during an anti-government demonstration in Caracas.
Feb19 2014

10th picture
A protester confronts riot police during an anti-government demonstration in Caracas.
Feb19 2014

Photos by
Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images
Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters
Leo Ramirez/AFP/Getty Images
Jorge Silva/Reuters

Josefa Joaquina Sánchez (1765-1813)

Art by Taneisha (tumblr)

Josefa and her husband José María España were involved in La Conspiración de Gual y España, the first attempt to establish Venezuela as an independent country.  During this period, Joesfa sewed the first Venezuelan flag.  She also transcribed documents for the revolutionaries.

Josefa, José María, and the other conspirators were unsuccessful in their attempts to overthrow Spanish colonialism.  José María was killed and Josefa was imprisoned for eight years.  Josefa was released from prison in 1808 and banished to Cumaná with her nine children.  Despite Josefa’s pleading, her children were denied the right to attend university.  Josefa died before Venezuela achieved independence.   

#challenge365 #day64 an end and a new beginning. Dear Venezuela, from the land of the maple - as these past four years, I am with you. Today, the president Hugo Chavez has passed away. He fought against cancer and cancer won. For the first time in years, he couldn’t win the battle. This, although brings hope to many of us, is certainly not a reason to celebrate. We must embrace now more than ever endurance and be strong for the times to come. Venezuela now has the tough job to bring together a divided country, two different colours, different ideologies… Most importantly, we have to work for a better country, a safe one.

El tiempo de Dios es perfecto & KARMA exists!

Nothing makes me happier than to see the one lone Venezuelan Olympian come dancing into the opening ceremony

Everyone else comes in just walking slowly and calmly smiling and being all formal but then all by himself, he comes in laughing and screaming and dancing while waving the Venezuelan flag. If you don’t think that’s awesome don’t talk to me